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Will The "tiny House" Movement Catch On?

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http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/07/will-tiny-house-movement-catch-on.html

Dee Williams, who lives in a simple but stylish 84 square-foot home has started a company to help other people build their own mini-homes. It's all part of the "tiny house" movement, a trend becoming more popular as people look for ways to save money, help the environment and simplify their lives.

Think this will this catch on? I don't, at least in a big way. 84 square foot homes (or even 250) are simply too extreme. However, tiny homes are just a small part of a major and growing trend towards frugality and downsizing in general.

That trend has just begun. It is a crucial part of the deflationary environment in which we live.

I would add coming over here soon but some of the new build "executive" rabbit hutches might already qualify.

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No, but I think with rising council taxes, heating costs, etc, that more and more people will not want those huge houses built between 1895 and the late 1950s.

Loads of those in my area and I used to want one but now when I think of the upkeep, the maintenance and the hard costs then it depresses me.... so I go and have a cuppa...

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Guest Noodle

http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/07/will-tiny-house-movement-catch-on.html

I would add coming over here soon but some of the new build "executive" rabbit hutches might already qualify.

It's ludicrous. The whole thing. Do you remember the Beeb pimping those bizarre concrete box things in London aimed at 'key workers', bit like my old site hut. Fold down bed, toilet right there next to the miniature kitchen sink . . . carnage downsized and for only £50,000 too!

Geezuz.

I remember houses and flats in the UK now and well, it was like sitting in the car. :huh:

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Guest Noodle

Her whole house is only about two thirds of the size of my bedroom! I really couldn't cope without a proper kitchen and bathroom.

My living rooms over 800 square feet.

So you can fit 10 of those into one living room. It's just silliness. Silliness.

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Guest Noodle

Are you saying you'd struggle to hold a swingers party in one of these? :lol::lol:

It would be tricky to swing a pussy (cat) round, yes.

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No, but I think with rising council taxes, heating costs, etc, that more and more people will not want those huge houses built between 1895 and the late 1950s.

Loads of those in my area and I used to want one but now when I think of the upkeep, the maintenance and the hard costs then it depresses me.... so I go and have a cuppa...

Was speaking with a middle aged couple the other day who were trading down , they said everyone they knew were trading down houses and cars, maybe trading down will be the new keeping up with the Jones. They had no mortgage but said it was running cost's and bills.

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How about a £200k RBS mortgage on one of these?

japan-if-home-is-a-cubicle-barely-bigger-than-a-coffin-02.jpg

if that's not acceptable then they'll sell you one of these

coffin.jpg

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How about a £200k RBS mortgage on one of these?

japan-if-home-is-a-cubicle-barely-bigger-than-a-coffin-02.jpg

if that's not acceptable then they'll sell you one of these

coffin.jpg

That's a really good idea. If you don't show up at your NMW job for a couple of days an automated device could turn up and just nail it shut.

Edited by Minos

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Dee Williams, who lives in a simple but stylish 84 square-foot home has started a company to help other people build their own mini-homes. It's all part of the "tiny house" movement, a trend becoming more popular as people look for ways to save money, help the environment and simplify their lives.

That place is way more than 9' x 9'.

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How about shipping containers for homes? Probably been discussed here before but on this website they look great!

Shipping Container Home

2.png

3.png

I know Travelodge built their Heathrow Central hotel out of recycled shipping containers a couple of years ago so a precedent in terms of planning regulations must already have been set?

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Its interesting that the picture shows a small house in the middle of an empty field.

I expect the reality would be more like this.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Jonestown_Houses.jpg

Yes, my thoughts too. If the US follows this route, it's only a matter of time before the money grabbers realise they can squeeze more into less land. And I think that would be a shame. One of the best aspects of US life is the abundant space everywhere (regardless of the fuel implications).

Her home is basically a caravan, but without even running water. I suspect the real thrill for her is the financial saving. While she leaches of her elderly friend she pays no rent or rates. $8 a month for fuel and that's it. Hell, that could tempt any penny pincher hehe.

No, but I think with rising council taxes, heating costs, etc, that more and more people will not want those huge houses built between 1895 and the late 1950s.

Loads of those in my area and I used to want one but now when I think of the upkeep, the maintenance and the hard costs then it depresses me.... so I go and have a cuppa...

You're ahead of me in this, but I may be following. I had the "dream" for years of owning a nice victorian house, because that's what I grew up in and they are far more spacious than new build tat.

But eventually you start considering the running costs. The reality is a small box costs a fraction to run compared to a nice big place. When I see a huge mansion now, it makes me wince thinking about the costs. Buying the place is one thing, having the huge wealth to keep running it is quite another.

I suppose the upshoot of all this is that thanks to peak oil, we are all becoming poorer?

Running costs become such a concern that they begin to influence peoples buying decisions. I'd still love a big place to live in, but I'd hate the costs. Maybe a compromise is live in a small place, but with large grounds. And that's actually how many Americans already live. Their modest homes (we might call them temporary) sit in big plots of land. I could handle that.

How about shipping containers for homes? Probably been discussed here before but on this website they look great!

Almost any type of home can look good providing it sits in open land. Pile 'em high and they start to look oppressive. And as we know, it's not the initial cost of the home that counts. It's the land cost, and then the long term running costs.

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Guest Noodle

According to the BBC the average new UK house is about 800 sq feet in total.

I'd prefer 800 feet squared.

This place is 2200 sq.ft and it's starting to feel small. Had a 6000 sq.ft place planned, but that's too big. Silliness.

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http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/07/will-tiny-house-movement-catch-on.html

I would add coming over here soon but some of the new build "executive" rabbit hutches might already qualify.

An appropriate commentary n the falling standards in this country. IIRC we already have the smallest houses among Western nations.

We put up with too much in this country and we may be nearing the point where tolerance slips over into intolerance.

"The people have no need to fear their government but the government has every need to fear the people."

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Anyone have any idea how building regulations, planning etc would affect building something that small in this country, assuming it was mostly stationary? I'm actually quite tempted.

I've had holidays on narrow boats and I wouldn't mind being in a small space if it was designed extremely well and had a big garden or green space nearby - most narrow boats seem to be designed a heck of a lot better for living in than new build flats etc, and I imagine these would probably have similarly sensible layouts. I've already looked into residential boats where I'm living, but moorings are pretty much impossible to get.

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The problem isn't the cost of the house it's the cost of the land stupid.

These actually make the problem worse as they used more land per person that a descent sized flat in a block of flats.

What we keep seeing is an attempt by the government to make the working population live in smaller and smaller homes.

The catch is, due to housing benefit, those who DON'T work get to live in full-sized houses.

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Guest Noodle

The problem isn't the cost of the house it's the cost of the land stupid.

These actually make the problem worse as they used more land per person that a descent sized flat in a block of flats.

What we keep seeing is an attempt by the government to make the working population live in smaller and smaller homes.

The catch is, due to housing benefit, those who DON'T work get to live in full-sized houses.

Mentalism isn't it?

I mean most new builds and flats in Blighty these days, it's like sitting in the car!

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