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2000 Cornwall Council Jobs To Go

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Extrapolating from this one council if a £100 million reduction in their budget leads to 2,000 jobs losses.. then the proposed £90 billion in cuts that the coalition wants to make would lead to 1,800,000 job losses.

Or about 6.4% of the British workforce.

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Guest absolutezero

Extrapolating from this one council if a £100 million reduction in their budget leads to 2,000 jobs losses.. then the proposed £90 billion in cuts that the coalition wants to make would lead to 1,800,000 job losses.

Or about 6.4% of the British workforce.

A lot more when you include the knock on effect on the private sector.

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Extrapolating from this one council if a £100 million reduction in their budget leads to 2,000 jobs losses.. then the proposed £90 billion in cuts that the coalition wants to make would lead to 1,800,000 job losses.

Or about 6.4% of the British workforce.

From the article:

ABOUT 2,000 council jobs in Cornwall are to be axed in a bid to save £110 million over the next four years in local government spending. £110 million OVER 4 YEARS equates to £27.5 million a year. Divide this by 2000 and each job costs the council £13,750

If the government needs to cut £90 billion - that equates to 6.5 million jobs

Looked at a bit more realistically perhaps ... if it costs the goverment 25k a year to employ someone (18k salary + pension + office + desk + chair + computer) - and they are borrowing £150 billion this year - they are borrowing THE ENTIRE WAGE BILL OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR.

So, everyone - all 6 million of them - need to be sacked to stop the borrowing.

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

I am more than qualified and I will do it for 45K. Cheers.

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laughable....................WHEN are these jobs going or is this a bit of "natural wastage"?

Mike

It quotes a Council Cheif responding to this question saying there will be compulsory redundancy.

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

And they'll empty the bins, wipe the old people's bums etc?

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Thank god the expert managers are being spared. I suppose as the head count reduces they will be supervising less people meaning there remuneration should stay the same.

Your logic is faulty, I think such a scenario should qualify them for a significant payrise.

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

The 2 arguments that are always used to justify high wages or very generous pensions:

You have to pay big money to get the best people

and

thats the contract and its illegal to change the contract.

But have you noticed these arguments only seem to apply to them.

Every one else just gets paid the minimum that they can get away with and the contracts are not worth the paper there written on.

Take Fred Goodwin they said we know he ******ed up and will get a good pension but we cant change it.

But they can change everyone else's pensions and redundancy payments , just look at the civil servants they want to change the law so as to change

their redundancy payments just because they want to lay them all off.

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A lot more when you include the knock on effect on the private sector.

incorrect my dear boy

the private sector will bounce back like an enthusiastic puppy freed from its bossy smothering mother

Edited by Si1

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

Reminds me of that cartoon of the boat with one rower and 9 coxes.

If the council isn't performing just need to hire more managers to sort it out. And more a few months later.

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The 2 arguments that are always used to justify high wages or very generous pensions:

You have to pay big money to get the best people

and

thats the contract and its illegal to change the contract.

For once, Fudge, I agree with you.

The "big money" thing, in creative non-manual jobs at least, has been proven to be factually incorrect.

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incorrect my dear boy

the private sector will bounce back like an enthusiastic puppy freed from its bossy smothering mother

The article points out 50% of their spending is on goods and services. That would be the private sector then.

Cornwall already has quite a small private sector, its not been priviliged to development funding on the scale that say Wales has.

There is a lot of poverty there. I dont see a 30% cut in spending invigorating the remains of the economy.

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During press conference, when asked why no top bosses would be losing their jobs, a top boss said because, at a time of big problems, you need the best "talent" available to minimise the effects, so had to pay the going rate. Unbelievable.

That old chestnut! Okay, what's the George Osbornes Website link again for ideas to save cash? Let's all get posting. Seriously.

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20% of management went at the Council next door to us; the rest of the workforce has been served at-risk notices or expect to next year. 20-30% of them are likely to eventually go if the anticipated cuts necessary come through after the October spending review.

That Council, like CDC below, is Tory dominated and was recently "Unitaried"; 100s of non-management jobs went then, partially voluntarily, which was Labour's way of making progress against bloated councils. Then the debt crisis hit half way through the Unitary process for some areas. Norfolk got away with pulling out but in time that may make their pain worse.

Cornwall is a massive Council, and if the CX delivers, he would be worth his money IMO; assuming the middle management cull has already adequately been done then one top dog who could run a Council like a tough business is worth their weight in gold....especially if you think of the Housing Association chiefs on twice this who play a bit of social Monopoly for profit from taxpayers.

The new Cornwall Council will take over on 1 April 2009. The unitary authority will have a staff of more than 22,000, making it the biggest single employer in Cornwall and one of the largest in England.

It will amalgamate the county council and six existing district and borough councils, making a saving of about £500,000 by having one chief executive.

The chief executive of the unified Cornwall Council is to be paid an annual salary of £200,000, it has been announced.

Kevin Lavery, who will take up his post next month, will lead an organisation with a budget of more than £1bn.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/7702903.stm

Kevin Lavery’s Education

University of Southern California

Harkness Fellow , Public Administration , 1994 — 1995

University of Kent

PhD , Urban and Regional Studies , 1981 — 1984

The University of Manchester

BA Hons , Town and Country Planning , 1978 — 1981

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cornwall/7702903.stm

Interview with Lavery;

BC: People say in times of recession, the public sector is the place to be.

KL: There is a lag effect. Tax revenues have declined tremendously and therefore the amount of Government spending will have to go down to match this. So all the senior managers in local government know that, particularly after the General Election, we are going to be faced with a spending squeeze like never before. And that will be a huge challenge for Cornwall, because if you look at the Cornish economy, the Government sector is a huge part, a much bigger part of the Cornish economy than it is in most other regions.

So if we have the Council and other public agents trimming every year from 2011 onwards in a significant way, that in itself is going to be a big challenge. And this is one of the advantages of being a unitary. I know a lot of people didn’t think unitary was a good idea, but one of the great opportunities we have is because we do have duplication and inefficiency from the previous districts, if we really push that and focus on removing the duplication and improving the efficiency, in a spending squeeze, fingers crossed we can protect front line services.

BC: What’s your long-term plan personally?

KL: What we need here is stability, continuity and focus. And a team, at political and officer level, that is like a dog after a bone. We’ve had too much change in recent years. And I’ve said to the Council, it will take 5-7 years to turn this around into a really top, top council that’s going places. It’s that sort of project and I want to be part of that for the whole period.

http://www.businesscornwall.co.uk/features/face-to-face/face-to-face-with-cornwall-council-chief-executive-kevin-lavery-123

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Guest Noodle

It's a strange old world.

Some of you may remember the drunk I mentioned, filling out a form here to collect welfare. Well, cycling back from the shop with the little one about an hour ago, we bumped into this chap. Stepping out of a brand new local government Toyota Hilux replete with red and blue flashing lights on top.

'Hey Mike, have job now!'

I do question whether the coalition in the UK are going to go too far with cutting. Is there really a free market economy in existence that's all inclusive?

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From the article." when asked if top managers would be getting the boot......Mr Robertson replied Now is not the time to be getting rid of your best managers who are on top of their game " :D

So.. err.. when is ?

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Your logic is faulty, I think such a scenario should qualify them for a significant payrise.

Indeed, these are trying times for all, and that extra stress should be rewarded.

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Indeed, these are trying times for all, and that extra stress should be rewarded.

Yes just think of all those tough decisions they will have to make.

I always thought a tough decision was a decision to endure hardship but they mean making decisions that make others suffer hardship.

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From the article:

ABOUT 2,000 council jobs in Cornwall are to be axed in a bid to save £110 million over the next four years in local government spending. £110 million OVER 4 YEARS equates to £27.5 million a year. Divide this by 2000 and each job costs the council £13,750

These numbers are probably after they have paid the redundancy.

The savings in year one from sacking 2,000 perople is going to be zero

tim

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