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What’S Really Going On Behind Murdoch’S Paywall?

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Thought this might interest you lot.

Rupert Murdoch is trying to make news at the Times and Sunday Times in London—but he’s not reporting on it. Will his paywall work is the biggest story in the media business, and it would be quite a journalistic coup to document the progress, or lack thereof, that’s being made in trying to convince a skeptical world to shell out 2£ ($3) a week for what’s heretofore been free.

He is not reporting on himself because even less than most news outlets, Murdoch outlets have no objective sense when it comes to their own interests (or the boss’s interests), or willingness to ask questions which the boss might find uncomfortable, or penchant for anything but the party line. The news from News Corp. is always snarlingly good—even when it is very bad.

My sources say that not only is nobody subscribing to the website, but subscribers to the paper itself—who have free access to the site—are not going beyond the registration page. It’s an empty world.

Anyone missing that cocktail of Anne Ashworth, Rosie Millard, David Smith and Anatole Kaletsky?

I'd pay to read Bill Emmott, but here's his free website: http://www.billemmott.com/

Full article:

http://www.newser.com/off-the-grid/post/502/whats-really-going-on-behind-murdochs-paywall.html

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Guest absolutezero

Thought this might interest you lot.

If true it's the best thing I've heard in months.

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The media owners need to realise that the old journalism model is dead. Instead of having 200 highly paid journalists in your office in London pick and choose input from a global network of freelance writers and pay them a small amount for articles written.

I see it no different than the music business - theres more music around than ever but the days of half the country going into HMV at Christmas to buy Borthers In Arms are over and they arn't coming back.

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The same link was posted on boing boing a few days back

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/07/16/winds-howl-through-t.html

The Assistant Editor of The Times pops up the comments to defend it! they are "happy with the traffic" ! I think posting a defence on a minor website shows its a total disaster. No real figures yet, but some are saying its as low as 1% of previous readers, they are trying to muddle it slightly by using numbers of people visiting the times front page, and not going further.

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For me it characterizes all that is wrong with these papers. This is what happened to the Evening Standard - the journalism was so slanted, patchy and self-interested (mostly column editors whingeing about hoodrats or council taxes) that eventually the market simply decided that it valued their journalism at zero and bingo it became a free paper.

The Times and Sunday Times are in the middle of that learning process but being dinosaurs they haven't got it yet. Seriously can't you just see David Smith being an advisor behind this brilliant initiative?

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The same link was posted on boing boing a few days back

http://www.boingboing.net/2010/07/16/winds-howl-through-t.html

The Assistant Editor of The Times pops up the comments to defend it! they are "happy with the traffic" ! I think posting a defence on a minor website shows its a total disaster. No real figures yet, but some are saying its as low as 1% of previous readers, they are trying to muddle it slightly by using numbers of people visiting the times front page, and not going further.

My favourite comment :

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The Times Vs HPC.co.uk

Give it another month and more people will be reading about HPC than read the Times online... What a result!

TimesVHPC.gif

:D

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BBC Radio Four's The Media Programme quoted the figure of 15,000 subscribers to the website since it went behind the paywall. If so, Murdoch is in serious trouble - with traffic that low, advertisers are going to disappear as well.

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The Times Vs HPC.co.uk

Give it another month and more people will be reading about HPC than read the Times online... What a result!

TimesVHPC.gif

:D

Nice one! How does it look if you expand the period to two years, like your other chart?

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Nice one! How does it look if you expand the period to two years, like your other chart?

Like this. I don't think they are all coming here.

TimesVHPCLong.gif

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I signed up for the free run - read it once and have never bothered since. Frankly I find HPC far more interesting. If anything important happens in the world someone on HPC is bound to bring the subject up.

I used to read the Guardian and Telegraph on line but now I rarely even bother with those because of all the crap that comes with them and sends my hard drive racing. The only site I frequent is the BBC. Even though I have a free TV licence I don't have a TV and find I can get all the entertainment I want on BBC interactive. I do occasionally buy the odd classic DVD providing it's a fiver or under.

I read the Metro on the tube because it's free and I don't have access to my computer.

I think it must be at least 2 years since I actually paid for a newspaper. The sooner the traditional press realise their days are numbered, the better. No doubt there will still be a niche market just as there is for horse saddles.

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TimesDead.gif
BBC Radio Four's The Media Programme quoted the figure of 15,000 subscribers to the website since it went behind the paywall. If so, Murdoch is in serious trouble - with traffic that low, advertisers are going to disappear as well.

Another explanation would be that these stats are, in the normal case, simply statistical soup - that the vast majority of "hits", "clicks", "click-throughs" etc are in other words due to something other than human readers accessing content one article at a time.

The electronic equivalent, you might say, of a publisher offering a price into the channel for all unread papers at end of day (with an equivalent effect on "circulation" numbers).

One wonders what shape equally "popular" (by this measure) sites would take on, with an equivalent, but free (and no registration required) click-through wall put in place.

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I stopped looking at the Time the moment they started asking for registration. I haven't missed it.

The Times will simply cease to exist in many people's eyes.

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Guest sillybear2

I stopped looking at the Time the moment they started asking for registration. I haven't missed it.

The Times will simply cease to exist in many people's eyes.

Murdoch is simply taking revenge for the $580m he wasted on MySpace.

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I think it must be at least 2 years since I actually paid for a newspaper. The sooner the traditional press realise their days are numbered, the better. No doubt there will still be a niche market just as there is for horse saddles.

Those were the days - when everyone bought a horse saddle on their way to work in the morning. We had a garage full to the ceiling with them.

How long before it's free again. I'd give it a month before we get the 'we thought we'd give it a try but it hasn't worked, now we're going to have to sack the Brick Chicks (puke) and pay them the odd £100 quid for an article instead of having them on staff at £100k a year'

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How long before it become free again after Murdock describes the paywall as a resounding commercial success but because no one else is doing it they've decided to make it free.

To be honest I've not really missed it.

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Guest sillybear2

I heard somebody describe it as "trying to charge a toll on the middle lane of the motorway when the other two lanes are free" :lol:

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Guest sillybear2

Give it six months and Murdoch will complain about the BBC 'distorting the market' with its free access.

We all know the BBC exists to distort minds, not markets <_<

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The media owners need to realise that the old journalism model is dead. Instead of having 200 highly paid journalists in your office in London pick and choose input from a global network of freelance writers and pay them a small amount for articles written.

I see it no different than the music business - theres more music around than ever but the days of half the country going into HMV at Christmas to buy Borthers In Arms are over and they arn't coming back.

Yup!

The problem for Murdoch and co is that their business model is being made obsolete by progress. They're trying to some how wind back the clock, but they will fail. They are going to have to downsize and embrace change, just as the music industry is being forced to do.

The fact is, now the Internet is here, anyone can be a news publisher. The good ones will gain respect and will get linked from forums (like this) and social networks. TBH, I'm sure many of the writers will embrace this change, if they haven't already - they will market their own name/blog instead of having to work for the Murdochs of the world.

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I heard somebody describe it as "trying to charge a toll on the middle lane of the motorway when the other two lanes are free" :lol:

Good analogy! :lol:

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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