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Dave Beans

What's The Best Degree To Do, Which Are In Demand And Gives A Sustaining Career?

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

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weirdly I'm stating to think media studies isn't as bad as it sounds. If you do well you cant start your own company, produce something new, or even get into HR or media consultancy. The degree is probably optional, but it could be a good foundation, everything is media this media that...

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Interestingly I came across this a little while back - it may be of use to you:

Average extra earnings for graduates by subject studied

Subject studied: Average extra earnings (compared to non-graduates)

Medicine: £340,000

Law: £245,000

Engineering: £245,000

Maths: £240,000

Physics: £190,000

Chemistry: £185,000

Business: £185,000

European languages: £165,000

Psychology: £100,000

Linguistics and English: £95,000

Humanities: £50,000

Arts: £35,000

Data from 2005 and 2007

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Pharmacy seems quite good. When qualified you can work in the likes of Boots the Chemist, independent pharmacies (set a new one up if you like!), hospitals or go into research or the pharmaceutical industry. Also a good job if you want part time as you can get plenty of money as a locum.

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Dunno as I did a pointless humanities degree :P

The one leaping to mind is

Medicine

Due to the variety of work, possibility of living abroad and being a vital member of society.

Otherwise it is hard to say - I'd imagine doing Actuarial Studies would get you a decent job. Dunno if it would be fulfilling. Depends what you mean by fulfilling. I have done jobs some would assume are fulfilling but found tedious and other jobs some would describe as tedious but I find if not fulfilling, nothing to dread about doing.

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Personal opinion - a degree is pretty pointless when it comes down to it unless you want to go into a profession which actually requires one such as medicine, law, accountancy, etc. The numbers of graduates who can't find work and those who take up carreers unrelated to their degree tells you that.

Most people who get degrees do them because they want one and want to have three years at uni getting p1ssed. I'm not saying that that's wrong but I don't see why it should be subsidised by the tax payer when it doesn't really provide much benefit (if any) to the country.

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Guest Noodle

You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Hair and Beauty NVQ level 2.

Ummmm . . .

Pure and applied sciences

Engineering (electrical, mechanical, chemical) then specialize (pharma/energy/manufacturing)

Anything to do with creating an end product of use, probably the best rule of thumb for the future.

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Obviously medicene is good, but only if you can stand cutting up dead bodies. Competition is also hard for places, as with Law.

I reckon the sciences/engineering are where its at, provided you can do the maths. There is not as much competition for places either.

Of course, these subjects are not always the highest paid disciplines. But if you have a good degree in a numerate subject you can go on to do just about anything you want. Even investment banking or accountancy, perish the thought.

Of the engineering subjects, I seem to remember chemical engineering is the highest paid.

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010/apr/24/degree-media-studies

This article indicated where media studies degrees may lead. The central problem with 'media' is that there are far too many people chasing too few jobs; the work available is often freelance or short contract, and there seems to be a lot of nepotism. Who you know, not what you know.

A good introductory book on the industry for any young person is Llewellyn and Walker's A Career Handbook for TV, Radio, Film, Video & Interactive Media - latest edition obviously.

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Pharmacy seems quite good. When qualified you can work in the likes of Boots the Chemist, independent pharmacies (set a new one up if you like!), hospitals or go into research or the pharmaceutical industry. Also a good job if you want part time as you can get plenty of money as a locum.

Very good salaries too. However the number of students taking pharmacy has increased dramatically in the past few years, so there may be a lot of downward pressure on salaries and jobs coming up.

Accountants always seem to do well. But much of the training for that is post-degree!

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Hair and Beauty NVQ level 2.

Ummmm . . .

Pure and applied sciences

Engineering (electrical, mechanical, chemical) then specialize (pharma/energy/manufacturing)

Anything to do with creating an end product of use, probably the best rule of thumb for the future.

I can understand that...I've dabbled in IT, as well as (stranglely) Planning. I've always fancied leaving some sort of "legacy"..my stamp as it were..

But I've also recently thought about 1-1 mentoring, especially those who need help (bloddy hell, I sound like Claire Rayner), such as ppl who who've been on long term benefits..For that, you don't really need a degree..

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The first thing to do is stop thinking in terms of 'career' and working for somebody else.

The thought needs to be, what can I choose to do that will have me running my own business as soon as possible?

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Guest Noodle

I can understand that...I've dabbled in IT, as well as (stranglely) Planning. I've always fancied leaving some sort of "legacy"..my stamp as it were..

But I've also recently thought about 1-1 mentoring, especially those who need help (bloddy hell, I sound like Claire Rayner), such as ppl who who've been on long term benefits..For that, you don't really need a degree..

Local technical college, NVQ's is what you're looking for.

I have BSc(Hons) . . . big deal, but my NVQ4 comes in the handiest.

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The real key is to do something that you find interesting, slightly challenging, but also that comes fairly natural to you.

Very few degrees lead to a career, though some enhance your employability. A numerical course with a smattering of arts to round you off from a good university is your best bet.

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As an anecdote I am job-hunting (degree in English) with about four years of work experience behind me and an agency has just rung me up to say they are recruiting for a bank which they did not name. It was 9-5 Monday to Friday plus a few weekends, customer facing etc.etc. The salary was 12k per annum and when I said I was was looking for something closer to the 20k mark she got a bit huffy and said realistically that was probably a bit much!

12k for a full time job in a bank? I'd earn more doing a paper round.

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Banking.

:ph34r:

Oh alright then.

Medicine. Lots of money, minimal parasitism(even the docs abusing the NHS are contributing something), and you are actually useful.

Engineering (soon to be valued again IMO).

Something leading to nanotech work (Physics/Chemistry/Biology I guess).

Genetics (try breeding co-operative and realistic humans).

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Of the engineering subjects, I seem to remember chemical engineering is the highest paid.

I did Chem Eng, and the course title is a lie. It isn't about Chemistry, or Engineering, it is maths. Then more maths, additional maths, hard maths, weird maths, and then fluid mechanics, which is maths on steroids. If you like maths, you'll do well. If you can't do maths, then you won't make it past the first term.

+1 on hard sciences being tops - not because you might want to be a scientist, but they are properly recognised by employers. Walking in and saying "I did Chem Eng at Imperial and got a 2:1" gets you an interview every time. You hear about grads sending out hundreds of CV and getting nothing back - I sent out 3 and got 3 offers in the pits of the early 90s recession. (Not because I'm smart or anything, just lucked out doing the right degree at the right place).

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I have older cousins basically from the last generation when a mere good degree in any old thing meant something - they got snapped up into corporate careers via the milkround and were driving nice motors in a couple of years. None of this work for six months free for experience. I don't think they'd had as much as a Saturday job in their lives.

Only 1 in 40 graduates gets an old-school milkround job these days so most will be faced with a labour market where 90% of jobs can be done by any old semi-literate for little more than minimum wage. Having worked in a number of companies over the last ten years I don't think it's a problem of 'Media Studies' or 'thick graduates' as I've seen some really bright sparks from upper tier Unis doing low-wage jobs long after graduation.

I think in the futue you'll either have to fight your way into an old school profession or just see life as a quest to get enough little revenue streams to get reasonable income. In fact, I know a lot of people doing to the latter - they may have a part time job for 15 hours a week, they may freelance at something, tutor, put on events than earn them some cash, peddle a bit, make a little money online.

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Be very careful before you pick one of those select few degrees that do lead to a specific career.

You're a bit ******ed when you have a civil engineering degree and find out that being a civil engineer is really tedious, badly paid, and shit, and that the industry is populated largely by *****ers

Do something of substance, but non-specific enough that you are pinned down to a vocation

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Be very careful before you pick one of those select few degrees that do lead to a specific career.

You're a bit ******ed when you have a civil engineering degree and find out that being a civil engineer is really tedious, badly paid, and shit, and that the industry is populated largely by *****ers

Do something of substance, but non-specific enough that you are pinned down to a vocation

combined hons with business is a good idea as long as you get enough knowledge on both sides of the combined, when you finish uni continue studying, hey even go down the management route...

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Late teens is far too late to be making these life moulding choices. Picking the right parents is far more important and then everything falls into place naturally.

p-o-p

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You hear about too many students taking up "pointless" degrees, such as Media Studies and David Beckham Studies, so I was wondering - what's the best degree (if you want to go down that route), where you can get a job fairly quickly after graduating, and will give you a long fulfilling career (if there is such a thing these days)...

Simple query:

- Do you have a soul? No - Law

- Next: Does the prospect of 7 years of rote learning entice you? Yes - Medicine

- Next: Can you do hard sums? Yes - Maths or Physics

- Next: Can you do sums? Yes - Engineering

- Next: Can you get up in the morning, before 10am? Yes - Other science

- Next: Are you posh? Yes - Classics.

- Next: Do You really just want to have a doss for 3 years? Yes - Simply roll a die for your choice:

1) Sociology.

2) Politics

3) Media Studies

4) Art (preferably one of those types where artistic ability is not required)

5) [insert country here] Studies

6) Film Studies

- No - you want to work hard at something but have no discernable skills or talent - Business studies.

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Do a degree that gives you loads of time to think about a business you could start (as mentioned above).

e.g. Land economy.

Learn loads about estate planning, tax law and asset allocation. It'll bore you to tears but will be well valued in the coming decades. Throw in some solid history, focusing on wealth creation and destruction.

Learn to trade the US markets in the afternoon.

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You're a bit ******ed when you have a civil engineering degree and find out that being a civil engineer is really tedious, badly paid, and shit, and that the industry is populated largely by *****ers

I believe you just described 90% of the jobs on the planet.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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