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TheBlueCat

Some Politicos Still Do Seem To Believe

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OK, no comment on Steven Haper in the general case (religious nutter I think) but his speech writer deserves credit for writing this and he deserves credit for saying it with some conviction:

http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?category=3&id=3520&featureId=6&pageId=26

Some quotes:

“’There have existed and shall continue to exist’ – in this simple phrase Parliament acknowledged that we are heirs to a tradition of freedom, and stewards of a precious legacy centuries in the making. It understood that legacy, not as a gift bestowed by government legislation, but as the birthright of every individual.

“The Canadian Bill of Rights reflects a fundamental truth: that human rights, by definition, must be universal. There can be no exceptions.

“The cornerstone about to be unveiled contains a stone from Runnymede, where the Magna Carta was signed. It will remind all who visit here that Canada is heir to a tradition of freedom upheld by the law, under the Crown, reaching back almost 800 years.

Stirring stuff and not anything any British politician of the last 20 years would be able to say with a straight face.

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OK, no comment on Steven Haper in the general case (religious nutter I think) but his speech writer deserves credit for writing this and he deserves credit for saying it with some conviction:

http://www.pm.gc.ca/...eId=6&pageId=26

Some quotes:

Stirring stuff and not anything any British politician of the last 20 years would be able to say with a straight face.

Stirring stuff and a load of bolleaux, just like any other "gumment" in the West these days. Sound bite speeches filled with platitudes to keep the masses in their boxes. I bet those quotes weren't running around the cunning brains of the politicians who introduced "emergency" legislation at short notice for the g20 summit in Toronto, that ended with hundreds of innocent protesters getting locked up.... and we pay for the privilege!

They should be judged on actions, not mealy mouthed words.

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Stirring stuff and a load of bolleaux, just like any other "gumment" in the West these days. Sound bite speeches filled with platitudes to keep the masses in their boxes. I bet those quotes weren't running around the cunning brains of the politicians who introduced "emergency" legislation at short notice for the g20 summit in Toronto, that ended with hundreds of innocent protesters getting locked up.... and we pay for the privilege!

They should be judged on actions, not mealy mouthed words.

Well, maximum 24 hours detention without charge and the recent settlement for forced adoption seem like a good start to me. It's all relative of course but I really do appreciate the contract with the UK all the same.

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Well, maximum 24 hours detention without charge and the recent settlement for forced adoption seem like a good start to me. It's all relative of course but I really do appreciate the contract with the UK all the same.

"The Canadian Bill of Rights reflects a fundamental truth: that human rights, by definition, must be universal. There can be no exceptions.

“The cornerstone about to be unveiled contains a stone from Runnymede, where the Magna Carta was signed. It will remind all who visit here that Canada is heir to a tradition of freedom upheld by the law, under the Crown, reaching back almost 800 years.

As crews dismantle the massive security fence from the G20 summit, questions are piling up about a secret cabinet decision giving police immense power to search and arrest anyone within five metres of the barrier.

Legal experts say a regulation authorizing the searches could be vulnerable to attack not just for potentially violating Charter protections against unreasonable search and seizure.

It could also be challenged on the grounds the public was not given adequate notice of the sweeping changes that required them to identify themselves to police officers or agree to be searched.

"I think it's beyond question it is a major intrusion into what is ordinarily thought to be a fairly basic right to move around the city without having to justify your presence or submit to a search," said Jonathan Dawe, a Toronto lawyer who has argued before the Supreme Court of Canada on the scope of police search powers.

http://www.thestar.c...legal-challenge

What's the "forced adoption" settlement? I've not been up to speed with the news these last few days...

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  • 245 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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