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Anyone Negotiated With Barratt Homes?

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A single mum of 3 living in a housing association house next door

This is part of the reason that homes in "nice" areas wont fall too much. No one wants to live next door to trash, and that will keep prices high.

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This is part of the reason that homes in "nice" areas wont fall too much. No one wants to live next door to trash, and that will keep prices high.

divot.

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This is part of the reason that homes in "nice" areas wont fall too much. No one wants to live next door to trash, and that will keep prices high.

Thats the reason houses in "nice" areas went up more than other houses...because snobs who couldnt afford to buy them paid over the odds for them....they will drop the hardest when the un-monied run out of credit.

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This is part of the reason that homes in "nice" areas wont fall too much. No one wants to live next door to trash, and that will keep prices high.

Of course they will. As soon as the difference is big enough to justify living next to the scum.

Also when you can't get a mortgage or haven't got a job it doesn't matter one bit how nice the area is.

Further. According to rightmove July report Kensington and Chelsea asking prices dropped by 5.2% (iirc)

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I know I'm in danger of answering the actual question in the manner it was asked, but when I bought one (at the 2007 peak, don't ask) I managed "15%" off, but since it was on an entirely new estate I'm under no illusion that they were just random numbers made to look "good"

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I've been renting a Barratt house for the last 18 months (think it was built around 2000) and I've got to say the build quality is shocking. Walls are paper thin and we've had several leaks and other problems with the plumbing. Luckily when things go wrong it's not my problem but there's no way I'd buy one.

And why do they not build garages big enough to even fit a small hatchback in there - what's that all about?!

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I bought a Barratts home in 2001 - shocking quality.

Didn't finish the fire wall

pipes with holes in were used (and soldered to fill the holes),

Gas oven was not fitted correctly to the wall!!

Sewage outlet was not angled correctly

Electric cables not buried deep enough (had to have pavement drilled up) - cables were also frayed

and that wasn't the half of it.

I also have a friend who bought a Barratts flat in 2005 - now in £30K+ neg equity

He has also mentioned to me today infact of some of the issues (leaks and his oven packing in)

Edited by OzzMosiz

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To add, I was not in the Market for a new build but these seem to tick a few box's, the rooms layouts seem ok etc, although for every reason why i shouldnt buy a new house as stated above these seem to be ok. Also, I wonder if it is easier to do a 'deal' with a builder than a vendor that wont negotiate. Obviously I am trying to building in falls that will occur as this year progresses, I am thinking

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To add, I was not in the Market for a new build but these seem to tick a few box's, the rooms layouts seem ok etc, although for every reason why i shouldnt buy a new house as stated above these seem to be ok. Also, I wonder if it is easier to do a 'deal' with a builder than a vendor that wont negotiate. Obviously I am trying to building in falls that will occur as this year progresses, I am thinking

Just offer a low price and see what happens. I can never understand why people are afraid to make low offers. If it doesnt' work, offer a bit more, or wait.

There's not going to be a 'Barratt' price that applies to all developments. If they've just put a new development on the market and it's selling well, they'll tell you to get stuffed. If it's been sitting there for a long while, there may be deals on the table.

Two tactics big builders use are:

1. Claiming that they never give discounts.

2. Deflecting you towards a special offer, such as free carpets, part exchange etc. There's nothing wrong with these offers, but put a price on them. Don't be fooled by swish marketing for the 'luxury package,' that basically boils down to a grand's worth of carpet and some metal light switches and taps worth less than a grand.

The other thing to bear in mind is that you'll be dealing with professional sales people, so think of it more like buying a new car than buying a house. Don't believe anythign they tell you.

As for the quality issues, check the unit you're actually going to buy and get a snagging report before you sign anything. Don't be fobbed off with the builders, 'quality assurance program'

For quality in general, new homes tend to be built pretty shabbily. However, anyone who believes that older houses were built in some golden age when everything was done by craftsmen should firstly take a look at the damp in my basement, and second buy a copy of The Ragged Trousered Philantropists to show how little the construction industry has changed over the years!

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I lived in a Barratt house from 1988 - 1992, Yeovil. I presume that the quality depends on the ability of the 'subbies' they use but they are ultimately responsible. It wasn't good.

Although the house was only 5 years old, the mortar / lead flashing over the front porch failed and when it rained, water ran inside the front door. NHBC said it was 'wear and tear'. I had to replaster parts of the ceiling near the front door & repoint myself in the end. Condensation was unbelievable. Big pools of water on the window sills in the mornings, and it was only single-glazing.

Guttering came off in the wind, but it was 'that storm' of 1988 that Michael Fish has nightmares about.

I'm sure they're not all the same but I wouldn't buy another one.

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I've never bought or lived in a Barratts house, but did buy a Persimmon home last year - and overall I'm very happy.

The main recommendation is to only exchange when the house is built, then they will make sure it's right as it's not yet sold.

I exchanged before decoration and the garden was done, I only had a few minor problems (all fixed in 2-3days). If I were you, go a jump the fence and inspect your house thoroughly before the windows are in, and do it several times.

The plus points for me, are probably the same as yours. Brilliant layout, really warm etc etc

But don't believe a word the sales people tell you. For me they made the experience far worse than it needed to be, they will lie through their teeth at every turn. PM me if you want more info.

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And why do they not build garages big enough to even fit a small hatchback in there - what's that all about?!

I've come to te conclusion that the garages did used to be big enough but the cars have got larger. Is it the NCAP safety ratings? Cars have to be wider to be safer?

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Yes, I negotiated with Barret homes. Not for a Barrett home but for a house they bought as part of a refused development.

Remember you are dealing with someone who does not have a personal attachment to the property. This is not Mr and Mrs OAP that you are trying to secure the best price possible from. You will not insult a Barrett employee. They may laugh at you but you are not trying to buy there own house.

Go in low and stick to your guns..

I bought a house in an really good area on a large plot that was marketed for £700k and managed to get it for £485k. He was one moody git bag but so what.

It`s squeeky bum time again for the builders and in reality on some projects they may just be looking to cover costs and get the feck out.

Good luck.

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But don't believe a word the sales people tell you. For me they made the experience far worse than it needed to be, they will lie through their teeth at every turn. PM me if you want more info.

Would be very interested indeed to hear about the sales people. Perhaps you'd be so kind as to share some details with all the HPC crowd?

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Would be very interested indeed to hear about the sales people. Perhaps you'd be so kind as to share some details with all the HPC crowd?

Well, half of it was just a lack of attention to detail. Such as my house should have been half render, half red brick - however the planning permission showed it as fully rendered (which I was happy with).

They talked of products in the house being a certain spec when they were not, such as the render - which was synthetic (i.e. coloured all the way though, so no need to paint) yet they said it would be fully painted. I obviously wanted the synthetic render, so a chat with the project manager corrected this (and this is the only type that is used now-a-days).

I was told there would be a kids playground on the green, which they have yet to build (although I'm not that fussed whether or not it's built).

I was told the rain water goes into soak aways, it goes into the main drainage. Just found out after I was claiming a lower rate from the water company.

I was told there were gates to the parking spaces at the back of my house, and I was worried that anyone could just put a padlock on for a laugh - no gates at all. But I don't really want any gates.

The above, and I'm sure there were other things, were quite trivial and were solved after talking to the right people. But why do the sales people have to lie? Why can't they say "I don't know", or "I'll find out".

The other things were their total unprofessionalism. I wanted lots of extras, TV sockets in the kitchen (stuff like that), but they couldn't be arsed to organise it until they had plastered downstairs! I've now done it myself, but I would have been happy to pay extra for that.

I also wanted a side door in my garage (single brick), and they wanted just under a grand. I told them they made a mistake, as it's not a cavity wall and just a wooden door. But they insisted the cost was the cost. I did it myself with a door off ebay - £250ish all in (and with a steel door).

The other thing was the an extra window, which they wanted £500 for, but she verbally said £200 for (they hadn't yet built to the upstairs windows). After an argument, it was £200.

I think part of it, the sales people just didn't like me as I was buying the biggest (and probably the best) house in the development and it was just me living there. I also put a sob story on saying that I couldn't afford carpets, so will live with no flooring for a year. But once I had moved in she was shocked to see everything kitted out with new stuff. lol.

I did have a few issues with the builders, and had a long list. Just a few, dish washer not plumbed in, chalk inside the window pane, no gromets on any of the radiators, kitchen cabinets wonkey, and the beading on the stairs was crap. They did fix it all to be fair, apart from the stairs where they knocked a hole in the wall. They did fix it, but I didn't have any more time to take off work to get it painted - so they gave me some paint.

The only gripes I have now is the visitor parking (2 spaces) are constantly parked in by the same people - I want a sign saying visitors there. And an issue with the render in one corner (mould/algae or something like that).

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Just to add, overall you need to be careful when buying new. It's very easy for builders to cut corners, but that's not to say all new homes are bad. My friends say I am very lucky, but there was no luck in it - do your research, and have a keen eye for detail.

I was going to buy a 2nd hand house before this, and that had far more problems than I, or any of my neighbours, have had.

Going back to the topic starter, I struggled to get a massive discount, as at the time (June09) prices were going back up from the bottom, I only got less than 10% off from asking, and I was going for 20% off. However, the price was far far cheaper than any comparable 2nd hand house, and the builder didn't seem to add a premium for it being detached.

Now I'm in, I only paid 15k more than my neighbours mid sized terraced (mine is 30% larger house and plot), but someone did pay £10k less than me who bought at the end of 2008 (just after the height of the crisis). Someone had paid 20% more than me (late 2007) for the same house, but a smaller plot. Also, another house sold Apr2010 (built 2007) (but the seller pulled out because they couldn't find anything) for 13% more than I paid a few months prior.

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I've come to te conclusion that the garages did used to be big enough but the cars have got larger. Is it the NCAP safety ratings? Cars have to be wider to be safer?

But if it's a new house shouldn't they build the garage wider to compensate? Otherwise it's just a big shed.

I just went to look at a house (built 1988) with a single garage in a block today and measured it up to see if my car would fit. The door is ok (just) but inside there are brick pillars sticking out (rest of the wall is single breeze block), so there would only be 10-15cm free to open a door.... :(

Most car doors are wider than that now with all the side impact bars + airbags. Guess I'll have to practice getting in & out dukes of hazard style!

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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