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SarahBell

Need Every Member To Write To Their Local Paper

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We've missed a trick here - we should have been writing all week to the local and national papers:

Find your local paper's letter page email and write your own or send this:

The national press is outraged at levels of rent paid via the housing benefit system being cut! I'm not sure why though.

Low rents are essential if the UK is to recover!

Most landlords who've done their sums correctly will be able to take the rent drop without any stress. It will only be those landlords who've kept buying at inflated prices that will find taking a drop in rent impossible.

Rents need to drop! People need to be able to afford to pay their rent when they start work, or change jobs. Paying less rent means that people have more money to spend on other items. This is better for the whole economy, whereas high rents only benefit landlords!

Whilst some bad landlords may evict tenants because of the drop in rent received then the good ones won't! They will realise that lowering rents to affordable levels helps the country out of a dreadful mess, caused in part by the excessive rises in house prices and new wave of landlords.

Another indirect issue that may arise from the drop in local housing allowances will be that house prices will slowly become more affordable as landlords no longer see the taxpayer funded benefits as the easy income they have been. This means people might stand a chance of buying a house rather than having to look at the slightly crazy shared equity schemes.

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Dare I suggest that the letter above is a little long and not quite as focused as it could be?

How about something closer to:

Sir

The media are painting the proposed cut in housing benefit as a bad thing. Yet high housing benefit supports high rents. A cut in benefit will drive down rents, thus saving taxpayer money while benefiting tenants everywhere. The people who will lose out are not the poor but any overextended landlords who rely on fleecing the taxpayer.

Yours,

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Interesting. Ill try and formulate a letter to put into a local paper - Most of these papers are funded by property ads/estate agents/VIs though - do they have a legal obligation to print letters, or will the VIs stop it?

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Interesting. Ill try and formulate a letter to put into a local paper - Most of these papers are funded by property ads/estate agents/VIs though - do they have a legal obligation to print letters, or will the VIs stop it?

You know I have heard so many people say that - but over the last few years I've had virtually every letter I've written published (In fact I think all of them...) they are mostly about housing and house prices.

Write and see!

They won't publish anything offensive or rude but it's such a thrill to see your name in print.

I don't read the guardian very often but I have written to them too and had feedback from local councillor who'd seen one letter I'd written and a journo from the bbc got in touch about another.

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i cant do short and concise letters, so something like this will have do to. Some of the other letters people write in are far longer though and usually only about a pothole.

In support of housing benefit cuts.

I feel it is necessary to provide some balance to the outcry in certain areas of the media and political circles against this policy. Firstly, we must remember housing benefit is not primarily a payment that benefit’s the tenant - it is a payment that benefit’s the landlord. A benefit, that in recent years, in spite of a massive reduction in both mortgaging costs, and in many cases, house prices themselves, has risen at an unsustainable rate, swallowing vastly more of the welfare budget despite providing no greater service. Many private landlords in receipt of housing benefit cases have enjoyed a vast increase in their income whilst at the same time millions have lost their jobs, and had to economise their lifestyles.

Secondly, housing stock is fairly constant, houses do not simply disappear if the rents they command falls, I seriously doubt tenants will find themselves on the street as the benefit they can pass to the landlord is due a slight reduction. If this was so, we would already have hundreds of thousands on the streets due to housing shortages. Commercial office rents, free from the distortions of housing benefit have been allowed to fall 15% since their peaks, and yet we do not see tenants crying out for more space - in fact, quite the opposite - landlords are crying out for more tenants due to the fact a tenant paying 15% less is better than no tenant at all.

Thirdly, housing benefit, due to its widespread nature, has increased costs for private non housing benefit tenants by putting an artificially high floor on rents and forcing more people into expensive government schemes, or else having to compromise excessively with regards to quality of accomodation.

Edited by Sadman

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Can I suggest focussing on the saving taxpayer money bit rather than making housing affordable (read lower prices). HO's (including most editors)don't likey the thought of their homes loosing value. Funnily enough most HO's sense of social justice doesn't extend to FTBs! Otherwise cracking idea-anything to speed the HPC and more productive than just moaning on here all day!

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Can I suggest focussing on the saving taxpayer money bit rather than making housing affordable (read lower prices). HO's (including most editors)don't likey the thought of their homes loosing value. Funnily enough most HO's sense of social justice doesn't extend to FTBs! Otherwise cracking idea-anything to speed the HPC and more productive than just moaning on here all day!

Get writing! Your own letter with it's own twist is best.

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Dare I suggest that the letter above is a little long and not quite as focused as it could be?

How about something closer to:

Sir

The media are painting the proposed cut in housing benefit as a bad thing. Yet high housing benefit supports high rents. A cut in benefit will drive down rents, thus saving taxpayer money while benefiting tenants everywhere. The people who will lose out are not the poor but any overextended landlords who rely on fleecing the taxpayer.

Yours,

Well I un-ashamedly cut and pasted this and sent it to the East Kent Mercury.

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Excellent...and if you have a Labour MP who will be attacking the proposed reforms, also worth writing to them and asking them why they are supporting the enrichment of the landlord class when you'd have expected them to be on the side of the working people and the people stuck in a benefits trap due to low paid jobs not covering high housing costs.

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Guest Noodle

It's a honourable and worthwhile idea, but think most people wlll stick their fingers in their ears and say 'not listening, not listening!!

I would, but my nearest local English language paper is Pattaya People News and they only print stories about ladyboys mugging dirty old men.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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