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Can You Buy Ebook Readers In the Shops


'Bart'

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Epubs are basically zipped HTML; on Windows if you rename from .epub to .zip, you can unzip them and see the HTML contents. If the HTML has dodgy line breaks or relies on specific character sets, the epub will have the same problem ..

I've fixed the first chapter by editing the xhtml file. Trouble is, the book has 30 or so small chapters. Fixing all those would be a bit of a busman's holiday for me.

Ta for the link though.

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Interesting development on the Kindle front. A new model, with a UK specific free 3G (or wifi for the cheaper model) connection and a dedicated UK Kindle store:

Amazon brings Kindle to UK, adds Wi-Fi

Amazon's latest Kindle eBook reader will feature Wi-Fi, a new browser and be sold directly from the UK for the first time.

The third generation Kindle features Wi-Fi access for the first time, in addition to the free 3G connection, for £149 including VAT. Amazon is also selling a Wi-Fi only version for £109.

LINK

LINK

Looks a smart piece of kit, very thin and light.

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Of course, if I were to buy one, that would spell the death knell for the product!

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Black and white screen? Are they mad?

All eInk screens are monochrome (8 levels of gray).

It is currently available commercially in grayscale only and is commonly used in mobile devices such as e-Readers and to a lesser extent mobile phones and watches.

It's supposed to me much better to read for extended periods as it isn't backlit.

But you may be right, people may expect colour screens and go for the iPad instead.

Colour may be on the way (link) but not quite yet.

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Interesting development on the Kindle front. A new model, with a UK specific free 3G (or wifi for the cheaper model) connection and a dedicated UK Kindle store:

Thanks, been waiting for news of a cheap, WiFi-only Kindle (no 3G here and it would mainly be for using at home).

Depending on how good and flexible the "experimental browser" is, I guess it might be possible to read unpacked epubs on it ... if not directly on the device, then via a web site.

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It's supposed to me much better to read for extended periods as it isn't backlit.

But you may be right, people may expect colour screens and go for the iPad instead.

Colour may be on the way (link) but not quite yet.

Mainly I think it depends on whether it's being bought as an ebook reader, or a general web/media access device. It's not obvious that titles with heavy colour content will be ones people are keen to take with them and view on a small screen.

For things like novels and most textbooks, the advantages of price, battery life, and reflectivity may welll outweigh the lack of colour.

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Mainly I think it depends on whether it's being bought as an ebook reader, or a general web/media access device.

I think that's where critics of eInk based devices go astray. A smartphone, iPod Touch or iPad are multi-purpose devices that can also act as eBook readers. An eBook reader is designed for a specific task.

Someone said it was like criticizing a digital camera because you couldn't make phone calls or Tweets on it.

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I love my Sony eReader. It will be 300 years before I have read all my new eBooks - or 20 years if I just target the good ones. My biggest fear is I'll get hit by a bus before I've managed to read them all.

J Lewis and Waterstones carry it and there is a strong second-hand market on eBay for virtually unused readers (lots of people don't love eReaders, I can't understand why. Luddites and Philistines IMO).

Calibre looks a bit daunting at first, but it is by far the best ebook software out there.

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In Manc airport now, £110 for the Sony 5"version. Possibly ex display as normally 127 and 178 for the 6".

From what I've read regarding the new Kindle, Sony may be releasing their next generation devices soon, so bargains may soon to be had with the current Sony readers.

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J Lewis and Waterstones carry it and there is a strong second-hand market on eBay for virtually unused readers (lots of people don't love eReaders, I can't understand why. Luddites and Philistines IMO).

Maybe they've upgraded to a later device?

Maybe some of them are the seriously rich, with the luxury of a Victorian house and space for a decent library of paper books?

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Having spent some time with a Kindle ereader today I have to say I'm impressed. I really can put up with eink. I have an ebook reader for my Android phone but I just can't comfortably read on that for prolonged periods.

The reason I'm attracted to the ereader is that there are zillions of free classics and out of copyright stuff that I really do want to read. Also, we have shelves full of dusty Penguin Classics that could just go to the charity shop and the ereader could ensure they were still available.

The new Kindle has, apparently, a 50% higher contrast screen. In fact, the fact that the contrast isn't quite as hot as a real book is the main downside to the technology, so if this is now in part fixed that'd be great.

Only issue is, Kindle seems to like its Mobipocket while Google and others support ePub. The Sony readers seem to support a wider range of formats.

So which is best?

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The new Kindle has, apparently, a 50% higher contrast screen. In fact, the fact that the contrast isn't quite as hot as a real book is the main downside to the technology, so if this is now in part fixed that'd be great.

Only issue is, Kindle seems to like its Mobipocket while Google and others support ePub. The Sony readers seem to support a wider range of formats.

So which is best?

New Kindle is sold out until September 10 according to Amazon.

Sony are rumoured to have a new generation of readers on the way, but say they won't enter into a price war with the new Kindle.

But I agree, the Amazon fixation on Mobipocket/.AZW is a real bug bear. If it weren't for that, the Kindle would be a no-brainer.

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New Kindle is sold out until September 10 according to Amazon.

Sony are rumoured to have a new generation of readers on the way, but say they won't enter into a price war with the new Kindle.

But I agree, the Amazon fixation on Mobipocket/.AZW is a real bug bear. If it weren't for that, the Kindle would be a no-brainer.

Yeah, I'm surprised the Kindle hasn't been hacked to support other formats, although I know there are conversion tools out there. The Apple TV is a rather limited device but brilliant when hacked to play anything and everything.

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If you haven't already, you could always try the Large Print section of your library. A lot of bestsellers come out in LP. They can be a mite heavy, though.

IMO people who really like reading will usually prefer paper books, at least for the foreseeable. People who like reading usually also like browsing, whether in bookshops, libraries, 2nd hand bookshops or charity shops. You can't browse with an e, not the same. And there's the added bonus of finding something interesting for free or for peanuts.

I tend to think that a fair percentage of the people who will go for e-readers will be more attracted by the shiny-gadget element than anything else.

I had an article published in a trade mag about 1995 in which I wrote that the internet was all very well but you'd never be able to buy second hand paperbacks on it! Second hand bookshops are very thin on the ground now due to high rates and the internet.

I do think books will survive, though they will be more as decoration (books do furnish a room) than practical objects. Books will be nice objects to show off, like the present-day Folio Society editions. Cheap paperbacks like Wordsworths will die out, I suspect, and reference books are already kaput.

I think eventually we'll read books via some sort of holographic projection from a pair of glasses and 'readers' will seem as outmoded as 8-track cartridge players.

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But I agree, the Amazon fixation on Mobipocket/.AZW is a real bug bear. If it weren't for that, the Kindle would be a no-brainer.

Kindle is a piece on the "control the content" game board. If it wasn't limited to a format that Amazon largely controls, it wouldn't be so cheap :)

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Kindle is a piece on the "control the content" game board. If it wasn't limited to a format that Amazon largely controls, it wouldn't be so cheap :)

True. Personally I'd rather pay more for the added flexibility of extra formats, but I don't think Amazon will quite see it that way.

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Digitised media = the death of knowledge. I can't see someone popping into the British Library in 500

years to examine some rare text on a bloody SwKindle.

Given that the ConDems are about to butcher our libraries too, we will soon be a nation of

illiterate morons.

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Digitised media = the death of knowledge. I can't see someone popping into the British Library in 500

years to examine some rare text on a bloody SwKindle.

...the explosion of knowledge, more like. On the one hand the British Library is supposed to archive everything that's published, on the other hand anyone can be multi-published nowadays, meaning they're legally obliged to furnish the British Library with copies:

This obligation applies to any book, pamphlet, magazine, newspaper, sheet of letterpress or music, map, plan, chart or table, and similar works.

which can't be so funny now, in this age of POD and laser-printed lost-dog posters. How much shelf space have they actually got? :huh:

That's without even considering documents published on the web or for e-readers. which will be orders of magnitude more than the stuff that actually gets printed out.

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Don't you end up with a lot of hyphens between words and odd line breaks?

The text wraps fine but I get the odd strange and abrupt line break here or there. Easily ignored though.

The last book I read like this was "Catch Me If You Can". Excellent read and actually better than the already really good movie.

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Digitised media = the death of knowledge. I can't see someone popping into the British Library in 500

years to examine some rare text on a bloody SwKindle.

Given that the ConDems are about to butcher our libraries too, we will soon be a nation of

illiterate morons.

I thought the British Library were digitising records and more and more are now available for the public to read, whereas before they would be locked up and only looked at by curators and the like??

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