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This Time Next Year Rodney, We'll Be Millionaires.

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http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/bargains-and-rip-offs/household-bills/article.html?in_article_id=509925&in_page_id=510&ct=5

£1m: What the bill for your life comes to

By Sean Poulter

22 July 2010

It is a final demand that will come as a shock to most of us - we will pay out almost £1m to cover essential bills during our adult lives.

Currently we pay an average of £1,541.91 a month to cover bills such as gas, electricity, telephone, mortgage or rent and food. This equates to £18,502.86 a year, or £962,148.72 between the ages of 18 and 70.

According to the price comparison website confused.com, which questioned 3,000 people, the annual figure has risen by £642.12 in the past 12 months, up by some 3.5%.

Given that millions of private sector workers have suffered a pay freeze or reduced income due to a cut in hours, the rises are putting a real squeeze on living standards.

Just this week it emerged BT is putting up landline call charges by 10% to counter the effect of customers switching to mobile or internet calls.

And despite gas and electricity bills being lower than a year ago, suppliers stand accused of failing to pass on the full benefit of falls in wholesale prices.

The country's big four supermarkets, Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda and Morrisons, have all enjoyed large profits in the past year on the back of higher food prices. Tesco alone made a profit of £3.4bn, or around £6,500 a minute.

A confused.com spokesman said: 'Times have been tough and with many people still feeling the effects of the recession, paying the bills is a major money worry.

'So it's more important than ever to make sure you are getting the best possible deal on all of your bills.'

We're there. Cash in, cash out. A perfectly streamlined, continually functioning economy where money isn't a problem. Get on board, plug yourself in and be a creditor and a debtor at the same time to get your hands on as much suff as you possibly can. Then die.

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Sounds a bit like this :ph34r:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a ******ing big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of ******ing fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the ****** you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing ******ing junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, ******ed-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life . . .

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So this is why we need house prices to go up two grand a month? :rolleyes:

Seems that way. The average person will be well short of £1m in after tax income during their lifetime.

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http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/bargains-and-rip-offs/household-bills/article.html?in_article_id=509925&in_page_id=510&ct=5

£1m: What the bill for your life comes to

By Sean Poulter

22 July 2010

We're there. Cash in, cash out. A perfectly streamlined, continually functioning economy where money isn't a problem. Get on board, plug yourself in and be a creditor and a debtor at the same time to get your hands on as much suff as you possibly can. Then die.

Interestingly enough £1542 a month is close to £1597 average take home (assuming average salary of 25k). So it is easy to see how we will be paying down the debt and amassing savings for the next boom.

:lol::o:(

http://www.thesalarycalculator.co.uk/salary.php

Edited by Shylock

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Interestingly enough £1542 a month is close to £1597 average take home (assuming average salary of 25k). So it is easy to see how we will be paying down the debt and amassing savings for the next boom.

Since most of the Sheeple live hand to mouth then this fits perfectly.

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Since most of the Sheeple live hand to mouth then this fits perfectly.

That's the dream. Once everyone lives hand-to-mouth, the machine has substantial inertia - it just needs the lightest of touches to keep it spinning at perfect speed. I've seen the future and it's washing-machine shaped.

Edited by AvidFan

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Since most of the Sheeple live hand to mouth then this fits perfectly.

The younger sheeple, who earn cr4p wages in insecure jobs and pay full tax and rent on everything they consume, I have sympathy for. There is not a lot of fat to trim as long as wages and prices in shops stay where they are. The older sheeple who bought property when it was cheap and have had 10 or 15 years to overpay at low interest rates but instead went on a credit-fuelled binge, I don't. This crisis is all about the older sheeple trying to hand the bill to the younger sheeple via their house price, government debt, bank bailouts, whatever. It's not going to work because the younger sheeple have no money.

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The younger sheeple, who earn cr4p wages in insecure jobs and pay full tax and rent on everything they consume, I have sympathy for. There is not a lot of fat to trim as long as wages and prices in shops stay where they are. The older sheeple who bought property when it was cheap and have had 10 or 15 years to overpay at low interest rates but instead went on a credit-fuelled binge, I don't. This crisis is all about the older sheeple trying to hand the bill to the younger sheeple via their house price, government debt, bank bailouts, whatever. It's not going to work because the younger sheeple have no money.

Correct

Also there are far to many younger sheeple who don't earn anything as there are so few jobs , but have already racked up massive debt going to uni.

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The younger sheeple, who earn cr4p wages in insecure jobs and pay full tax and rent on everything they consume, I have sympathy for. There is not a lot of fat to trim as long as wages and prices in shops stay where they are. The older sheeple who bought property when it was cheap and have had 10 or 15 years to overpay at low interest rates but instead went on a credit-fuelled binge, I don't. This crisis is all about the older sheeple trying to hand the bill to the younger sheeple via their house price, government debt, bank bailouts, whatever. It's not going to work because the younger sheeple have no money.

The young are now expected to becomes the growth slaves of the 21st century. They go to work, earn very little, pay for everything, but yet cannot afford the basics that the previous generation took for granted. Their role in the new world seems to be one where they bust their hump, get nothing in return other than beer money, all so the older generation can hang on to their ill gotten property gains.

Savers are equally treated with the same disdain.

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What the average amount of tax do we pay in a lifetime?

What kind of tax?

Are you just talking income tax or do you want to include everything - Income tax, National Insurance, Council tax, VAT, Road Tax, Fuel Duty, Booze Duty, TV License, tax on electricity, insurance, etc, etc...

I spent a few months monitoring my spending and working out my personal tax payout including all of the above and I reckon my current true tax rate is close to 70%.

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Interestingly enough £1542 a month is close to £1597 average take home (assuming average salary of 25k).

Coincidence?

B)

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That's the dream. Once everyone lives hand-to-mouth, the machine has substantial inertia - it just needs the lightest of touches to keep it spinning at perfect speed. I've seen the future and it's washing-machine shaped.

remind me what the alternative was, and what shape it took?

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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