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Financial Planner On Tv Last Night

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FP, or Jonathan Davis, was on BBC2's Money Programme last night - standing outside a Scottish gold mine!

He had a little table with a share certificate, some "gold bars" (several £million's worth had they been real!) some bottles of wine and a house brick.

He said that shares had been the best investment over the last year, that gold had been the best investment over the last 10 years, and the wine was best over the last 20 years. He never mentioned the house brick at all. ;)

An interesting point was made about investing in wine. Gold is still being mined and is never destroyed, but there is no way a new bottle of 1997 Chateau Lafite can ever be produced, and from time to time people decide to drink one so the supply is guaranteed to reduce. :)

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FP, or Jonathan Davis, was on BBC2's Money Programme last night - standing outside a Scottish gold mine!

He had a little table with a share certificate, some "gold bars" (several £million's worth had they been real!) some bottles of wine and a house brick.

He said that shares had been the best investment over the last year, that gold had been the best investment over the last 10 years, and the wine was best over the last 20 years. He never mentioned the house brick at all. ;)

An interesting point was made about investing in wine. Gold is still being mined and is never destroyed, but there is no way a new bottle of 1997 Chateau Lafite can ever be produced, and from time to time people decide to drink one so the supply is guaranteed to reduce. :)

You have just got to hope the number of people with the money fritter away does not reduce quicker than the supply.

It is comical that wine is even being discussed as a potential investment for normal people, just shows how near the end game we are.

Edited by Confounded

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You have just got to hope the number of people with the money fritter away does not reduce quicker than the supply.

It is comical that wine is even being discussed as a potential investment for normal people, just shows how near the end game we are.

Wine as an "investment" does have the feel of the last stages of a credit bubble doesn't it.

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You have just got to hope the number of people with the money fritter away does not reduce quicker than the supply.

It is comical that wine is even being discussed as a potential investment for normal people, just shows how near the end game we are.

It's a no-brainer for me. I have a great wine cellar back in Italy and I always add to my wine collection. That serves a few purposes:

- I love wine and can enjoy my favourites and ensure they are well kept

- I don't spunk the money on i-gadgets which get old and will never get used

- In case of Armageddon, I'll retire in my bunker and drink myself to oblivion in style.

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FP, or Jonathan Davis, was on BBC2's Money Programme last night - standing outside a Scottish gold mine!

He had a little table with a share certificate, some "gold bars" (several £million's worth had they been real!) some bottles of wine and a house brick.

He said that shares had been the best investment over the last year, that gold had been the best investment over the last 10 years, and the wine was best over the last 20 years. He never mentioned the house brick at all. ;)

An interesting point was made about investing in wine. Gold is still being mined and is never destroyed, but there is no way a new bottle of 1997 Chateau Lafite can ever be produced, and from time to time people decide to drink one so the supply is guaranteed to reduce. :)

Just as well no-one is producing billions of litres of new wine (a percentage of which will in time become a valuable aged vintage) every year then, isn't it?

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Wine as an "investment" does have the feel of the last stages of a credit bubble doesn't it.

Perfect for the wealth destruction phase. Along with modern art (that man monstrosity) selling for $64 million dollars when there are 9 others in existence.

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Vintage wine and gold are both valuable due to their scarcity. Neither is useful to any great degree. What's the difference? Only that the scarcity of a particular vintage of wine is assured while the gold supply increases. Sterling is not at all scarce and new sterlings are produced with the greatest of ease. :rolleyes:

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Aged vintage wine is constantly being produced - even if specific vintages aren't.

And unlike gold it does have an effective 'expires by' date - even the best wines cannot be stored indefinitely and remain drinkable. If it isn't drinkable, it loses its value. Not a terribly good store of value then and the necessary physical storage conditions are exacting (and expensive to maintain). Plus of course there's the slight matter of 'wealth density' of the physical material - not a patch on gold especially when you consider the aforementioned need for proper storage conditions. Nor of course can you divide the wine beyond the unit of a bottle.

In short, you'd have to be daft to consider wine an investment on a par with gold. If it's being punted to the masses as a safe investment you know the market has topped.

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FP, or Jonathan Davis, was on BBC2's Money Programme last night - standing outside a Scottish gold mine!

He had a little table with a share certificate, some "gold bars" (several £million's worth had they been real!) some bottles of wine and a house brick.

He said that shares had been the best investment over the last year, that gold had been the best investment over the last 10 years, and the wine was best over the last 20 years. He never mentioned the house brick at all. ;)

An interesting point was made about investing in wine. Gold is still being mined and is never destroyed, but there is no way a new bottle of 1997 Chateau Lafite can ever be produced, and from time to time people decide to drink one so the supply is guaranteed to reduce. :)

What about limited edition sandwiches?

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Vintage wine and gold are both valuable due to their scarcity. Neither is useful to any great degree. What's the difference? Only that the scarcity of a particular vintage of wine is assured while the gold supply increases. Sterling is not at all scarce and new sterlings are produced with the greatest of ease. :rolleyes:

Nicely put B)

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Guest Skinty

We were walking past the gold mine ourselves the other month on the way to climb Ben Lui. Past the sign where it said no unathorised entry there was an omnious looking sheep just standing there watching us. Was it an authorised sheep? Was it a guard sheep?

We have a friend who lives locally and he spends all his time panning for gold. Has quite a nice collection now. I don't think he actually does anything with it but it does look good under the microscope.

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Gold is being mined all the time, the key is to buy it during a equity/housing mania while its cheap rather than after the bubble has burst when its expensive as is the case now , I have a kilo bar of gold from many years back that i like to occasionally gloat over but its not really a lot of use and a bit of a worry if there is a fire etc ... Wine also was good but now is also a bit extreme as everyone else is wise to it and the good vintages of good wine are now too expensive to quaff, I have as much 1998 grange and 1996 latour in bond already to suffice for the rest of my life of boozing , I also bought all the must have Warhol and Picasso prints in the late 1990's which have also bubbled up but art is now being also created at a frantic pace ...

My current favorite is antique maps by Ortelius, his 1570 Theatrum orbis was the first ever atlas and the most expensive book ever produced at the time, the hand colored maps look fantastic framed on the wall and everybody without fail that comes to my place loves to look at them as they are both beautiful and picture a world we did not yet understand ( ie no Australia etc ...shuts the ozzies up ) there has been no bubble in these but they will never again be produced and they have a utility that gold does not, the value of them is fairly easy to benchmark as both single maps and the full atlases crop up at major auction houses frequently.

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Gold is being mined all the time, the key is to buy it during a equity/housing mania while its cheap rather than after the bubble has burst when its expensive as is the case now , I have a kilo bar of gold from many years back that i like to occasionally gloat over but its not really a lot of use and a bit of a worry if there is a fire etc ... Wine also was good but now is also a bit extreme as everyone else is wise to it and the good vintages of good wine are now too expensive to quaff, I have as much 1998 grange and 1996 latour in bond already to suffice for the rest of my life of boozing , I also bought all the must have Warhol and Picasso prints in the late 1990's which have also bubbled up but art is now being also created at a frantic pace ...

My current favorite is antique maps by Ortelius, his 1570 Theatrum orbis was the first ever atlas and the most expensive book ever produced at the time, the hand colored maps look fantastic framed on the wall and everybody without fail that comes to my place loves to look at them as they are both beautiful and picture a world we did not yet understand ( ie no Australia etc ...shuts the ozzies up ) there has been no bubble in these but they will never again be produced and they have a utility that gold does not, the value of them is fairly easy to benchmark as both single maps and the full atlases crop up at major auction houses frequently.

:lol::lol:

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Just as well no-one is producing billions of litres of new wine (a percentage of which will in time become a valuable aged vintage) every year then, isn't it?

They are turning a Spanish wine lake (millions of litres) into Industrial alcohol right at this minute! Trying to keep posh wines rare and thus prices up in the 'case' of the better vineyards.

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Gold is being mined all the time, the key is to buy it during a equity/housing mania while its cheap rather than after the bubble has burst when its expensive as is the case now , I have a kilo bar of gold from many years back that i like to occasionally gloat over but its not really a lot of use and a bit of a worry if there is a fire etc ... Wine also was good but now is also a bit extreme as everyone else is wise to it and the good vintages of good wine are now too expensive to quaff, I have as much 1998 grange and 1996 latour in bond already to suffice for the rest of my life of boozing , I also bought all the must have Warhol and Picasso prints in the late 1990's which have also bubbled up but art is now being also created at a frantic pace ...

My current favorite is antique maps by Ortelius, his 1570 Theatrum orbis was the first ever atlas and the most expensive book ever produced at the time, the hand colored maps look fantastic framed on the wall and everybody without fail that comes to my place loves to look at them as they are both beautiful and picture a world we did not yet understand ( ie no Australia etc ...shuts the ozzies up ) there has been no bubble in these but they will never again be produced and they have a utility that gold does not, the value of them is fairly easy to benchmark as both single maps and the full atlases crop up at major auction houses frequently.

small willy? ;)

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Aged vintage wine is constantly being produced - even if specific vintages aren't.

And unlike gold it does have an effective 'expires by' date - even the best wines cannot be stored indefinitely and remain drinkable. If it isn't drinkable, it loses its value. Not a terribly good store of value then and the necessary physical storage conditions are exacting (and expensive to maintain). Plus of course there's the slight matter of 'wealth density' of the physical material - not a patch on gold especially when you consider the aforementioned need for proper storage conditions. Nor of course can you divide the wine beyond the unit of a bottle.

In short, you'd have to be daft to consider wine an investment on a par with gold. If it's being punted to the masses as a safe investment you know the market has topped.

Made 150% return on my investment in some of the finest 1st growth Bordeaux last year. Yes 150%. Tax free. Not sure many other investments could touch this. I'm with Nationalist on this one.

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They are turning a Spanish wine lake (millions of litres) into Industrial alcohol right at this minute! Trying to keep posh wines rare and thus prices up in the 'case' of the better vineyards.

The two simply cannot be compared. First growth Bordeaux is so far from Spanish, New World plonk et al, it is arguably not even wine.

When it comes to fine wine it is all about year, vineyard and provenance. Outside of a handful of vineyards, you're really only buying to drink. Don't be so naive /obtuse [delete as appropriate].

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  • 258 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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