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ken_ichikawa

's Or S'

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Erm can anybody elicidate as to if this is correct or not?

's s and s'

I used s' several times which seems correct to the form of the more than one possessive.. (if that makes any sense)

Those bloody sons' of yours! (denoting more than one son)

Vs

Those bloody son's of yours! (I think is incorrect)

I think the top one is correct.... I still remember the example from the dummies guide to English and yet a short class I have joined recently the teacher marked all of my s' wrong.... is it an americanism or something? Have I made a mistake or has my teacher made a mistake?

(I think I shall omit the ' completely)

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Erm can anybody elicidate as to if this is correct or not?

's s and s'

I used s' several times which seems correct to the form of the more than one possessive.. (if that makes any sense)

Those bloody sons' of yours! (denoting more than one son)

Vs

Those bloody son's of yours! (I think is incorrect)

I think the top one is correct.... I still remember the example from the dummies guide to English and yet a short class I have joined recently the teacher marked all of my s' wrong.... is it an americanism or something? Have I made a mistake or has my teacher made a mistake?

(I think I shall omit the ' completely)

Those bloody sons of yours

Those bloody sons' use of apostrophes has to improve.

That bloody son's use of apostrophes has to improve.

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Erm can anybody elicidate as to if this is correct or not?

's s and s'

I used s' several times which seems correct to the form of the more than one possessive.. (if that makes any sense)

Those bloody sons' of yours! (denoting more than one son)

Vs

Those bloody son's of yours! (I think is incorrect)

I think the top one is correct.... I still remember the example from the dummies guide to English and yet a short class I have joined recently the teacher marked all of my s' wrong.... is it an americanism or something? Have I made a mistake or has my teacher made a mistake?

(I think I shall omit the ' completely)

An apostrophe denotes possession.

Sons is plural, therefore no apostrophe.

In your example it would be:

Those bloody sons of yours!

If you had one son and were speaking of his possession it would work so:

That is my son's chip shop.

If you had more than one son and it was their possession it would be:

That is my sons' chip shop.

Hope that helps.

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An apostrophe denotes possession.

Sons is plural, therefore no apostrophe.

In your example it would be:

Those bloody sons of yours!

If you had one son and were speaking of his possession it would work so:

That is my son's chip shop.

If you had more than one son and it was their possession it would be:

That is my sons' chip shop.

Hope that helps.

Thanks.....

I recall the dummies book example was talking about a something the sons had which somebody was complaining about.... can never remember it clearly.

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Guest theboltonfury

Your examples are grammatically incorect:

The car is my sons' (meaning two or more sons own the car)

The car is my son's (meaning one son owns the car)

My son's sick (my son is sick)

I have two sons

Doesn't the word son start to seem strange after if has been repeated a lot?

It even looks weird after a while.

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Guest X-QUORK

If you had more than one son and it was their possession it would be:

That is my sons' chip shop.

Correct, and the answer the OP was looking for I believe.

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Well spotted. In my defense I'm not well at the moment and if I don't stop and think about everything I make stupid mistakes. My typing is on autopilot so I keep typing the wrong word, either words that sound similar (like president and precedent, your and you're) or words that start the same but end differently.

Or even words like defense and defence... :rolleyes:

I'm in a mischievous mood tonight, so please feel free to ignore me or be rude to me as you see fit :P

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Erm can anybody elicidate as to if this is correct or not?

's s and s'

I used s' several times which seems correct to the form of the more than one possessive.. (if that makes any sense)

Those bloody sons' of yours! (denoting more than one son)

Vs

Those bloody son's of yours! (I think is incorrect)

I think the top one is correct.... I still remember the example from the dummies guide to English and yet a short class I have joined recently the teacher marked all of my s' wrong.... is it an americanism or something? Have I made a mistake or has my teacher made a mistake?

(I think I shall omit the ' completely)

To quote X-Q:

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrggggghhhhhhh! Don't get me started on misplaced apostrophes. :angry:

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Your examples are grammatically incorect:

The car is my sons' (meaning two or more sons own the car)

The car is my son's (meaning one son owns the car)

My son's sick (my son is sick)

I have two sons

Doesn't the word son start to seem strange after if has been repeated a lot?

Mmmm...beer!,

I love your sense of irony and wit........amazing that no-one has picked up on your ironic and obviously intentional mis-spelling of INCORRECT!!!!!!! Priceless ;)

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Guest Noodle

Mmmm...beer!,

I love your sense of irony and wit........amazing that no-one has picked up on your ironic and obviously intentional mis-spelling of INCORRECT!!!!!!! Priceless ;)

Fantastic tits too! :)

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I refer you to my earlier post where I blame my illness for my crapness - considering I'm too I'll to notice the squiggly red line under word which telld me I've mis-typed something, I think I'm doing rather well.

You really must be I'll... :D

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The plural form of collective nouns and proper/common nouns ending in 's' is a bit of a bear trap.

A collective noun counts as the singular form for apostrophe purposes. So for example, we would write:

Harriet Harman is concerned with women's issues

not...

Harriet Harman is concerned with womens' issues

and we would write:

Smith Brothers's tender for the job...

not...

Smith Brothers' tender for the job...

Assuming that Smith Brothers is the name of a company (i.e. a single entity and thus a proper, not a collective noun) and not multiple brothers of the family Smith acting independently.

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There's an easy way to remember how to use apostrophes.

Basically: that an apostrophe signals missing letter/s in a contraction.

This is obvious in cases such as "you're" for "you are", "I'm" for "I am" etc.

The missing link between these everyday obvious examples of apostrophe use to signal missing letters and possessive forms in English is that .... our possessive forms actually have letters missing.

To explain: in the past, we used to denote possession in English through the use of the "es" suffix.

So a cart that belonged to John was Johnes cart. A cart that belonged to The Smith Brothers was The Smith Brotherses cart. A pen that belonged to Dissident Junk would have been Dissident Junkes pen. We simply added "es" to the end of the name to denote possession in this form.

But, over time, for some reason, we dumped the "e" from "es", contracted the letters and used an apostrophe to signal the "e" was missing -- why we did this, I have no idea.

So Johnes pen became "John's pen". The Smith Brotherses cart became "The Smith Brothers's cart" or more often now "The Smith Brothers' cart" (either is correct). Dissident Junkes pen became "Dissident Junk's pen" -- the apostrophe indicates the absence of the "e".

If you remember the legacy of this rule, you will always know where to place the apostrophe in a possessive form, because you will always know to add "es" to the name of the owner, and then to whip out the "e" from that "es"and replace it with an apostrophe.

Now everybody open their books at page 23, and we will work through the examples on the board .... :lol:

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Well spotted. In my defense I'm not well at the moment and if I don't stop and think about everything I make stupid mistakes. My typing is on autopilot so I keep typing the wrong word, either words that sound similar (like president and precedent, your and you're) or words that start the same but end differently.

If you hadn't 'fessed up, I'd have assumed ironic intent :D

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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