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AteMoose

The Same Gene That Protected People Againt The Plague Protects You Against Hiv

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If true (this is wiki) this seems slightly scary.  Does this mean the plague and HIV were similar! It sounds like the plague was a more viralant airborne version of HIV?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyam

10% of europeans are immune to HIV:

http://www.scienceda...50325234239.htm

The bubonic plague is caused by a bacterium, whereas AIDS is caused by the HIV virus, so they're very different indeed. Also the plague was not airbourne, it was transmitted through flea bites. The article you link to makes it clear that there is no connection between bubonic plague and HIV, but it does talk about repeated exposure to other plagues giving rise to the genetic mutation that also protects against HIV. This is because the HIV virus attacks cells in a similar way to the viruses that caused these earlier plagues.

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The bubonic plague is caused by a bacterium, whereas AIDS is caused by the HIV virus, so they're very different indeed. Also the plague was not airbourne, it was transmitted through flea bites. The article you link to makes it clear that there is no connection between bubonic plague and HIV, but it does talk about repeated exposure to other plagues giving rise to the genetic mutation that also protects against HIV. This is because the HIV virus attacks cells in a similar way to the viruses that caused these earlier plagues.

I've read stuff - wish I could remember the name of the book now but can't - that proposed that the black death was some kind of hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus rather than bubonic plague. One of the bits of data used to construct the theory being the speed with which it spread which seems to be, in some cases at least, quicker than can be explained by rats/fleas. I've no idea if the theory is correct or not but you've got to think that this gives it a bit of a boost.

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I've read stuff - wish I could remember the name of the book now but can't - that proposed that the black death was some kind of hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus rather than bubonic plague. One of the bits of data used to construct the theory being the speed with which it spread which seems to be, in some cases at least, quicker than can be explained by rats/fleas. I've no idea if the theory is correct or not but you've got to think that this gives it a bit of a boost.

That is one of the ideas discussed in the second article tha the OP linked to. I would imagine the symptoms of bubonic plague are pretty distinctive, but I'm no medical expert. I wonder of there are any contemporary reports from the (1300s) describing them.

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I've read stuff - wish I could remember the name of the book now but can't - that proposed that the black death was some kind of hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus rather than bubonic plague. One of the bits of data used to construct the theory being the speed with which it spread which seems to be, in some cases at least, quicker than can be explained by rats/fleas. I've no idea if the theory is correct or not but you've got to think that this gives it a bit of a boost.

Thats a good point. Just how exactly do Scientists today KNOW that is was not a virus ?

Now maybe they are pretty certain. However how can they be 100% certain ? Is that even possible...

No idea myself.

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Thats a good point. Just how exactly do Scientists today KNOW that is was not a virus ?

Now maybe they are pretty certain. However how can they be 100% certain ? Is that even possible...

No idea myself.

Bubonic plague didn't just appear, wipe out lots of people and then vanish, it is still around today.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/feb/06/experience-bubonic-plague

If you take a look at something like

http://healthmap.org/en/

You begin to realise that at any point in time somewhere in the world there is someone dying of just about every nasty bug that has ever set up shop in the human body.

A quick scan and in the last 3 days we have had

Polio

Cholera

Legionnaires

Anthrax

Dengue Fever

Rabies

Malaria

Swine Flu

Bird Flu

African Swine Fever

Botulism

Syphilis

Plauge

Yellow Fever

Hantavirus

Norovirus

Parvovirus

and a bunch of undiagnosed nasties

Can't see Ebola, must be holiday this week.

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Bubonic plague didn't just appear, wipe out lots of people and then vanish, it is still around today.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/feb/06/experience-bubonic-plague

If you take a look at something like

http://healthmap.org/en/

You begin to realise that at any point in time somewhere in the world there is someone dying of just about every nasty bug that has ever set up shop in the human body.

A quick scan and in the last 3 days we have had

Polio

Cholera

Legionnaires

Anthrax

Dengue Fever

Rabies

Malaria

Swine Flu

Bird Flu

African Swine Fever

Botulism

Syphilis

Plauge

Yellow Fever

Hantavirus

Norovirus

Parvovirus

and a bunch of undiagnosed nasties

Can't see Ebola, must be holiday this week.

That's a seriosly unlucky guy to get that lot. Which country does he live in? I need to remove it from my holiday list.

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I thought Flouride protected against plague and tooth decay??

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There would have been plenty of smaller towns and villages that weren't affected at all, bubonic plague also kills the old and infirm more than it does healthy adults.

Ssshh!

You will give Ian Duncan Smith ideas!

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I thought ALL todays europeans were immune to the plague as the rest all died off. Shows what i know.

the Europeans ARE a plague.

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If you contract the plague and survive without the benefit of streptomycin or other modern medicine, do you become immune to it?

Can one make a complete recovery from an attack of plague, without modern medicine?

These are a couple of questions hanging over from an old writing project of mine.

If anyone that knows would care to share, I'd be most grateful.

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So take London in 1660 for example.

I suppose we don't exactly know which plague we had back then.

But if it was bubonic and someone had for example contracted bubonic plague on the continent and recovered from it, they would have nothing to fear from bubonic plague in London, right?

However, if it was septicemic that situation doesn't arise because septicemic is a silver bullet fin de jeu hand.

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So take London in 1660 for example.

I suppose we don't exactly know which plague we had back then.

But if it was bubonic and someone had for example contracted bubonic plague on the continent and recovered from it, they would have nothing to fear from bubonic plague in London, right?

However, if it was septicemic that situation doesn't arise because septicemic is a silver bullet fin de jeu hand.

survive the plague.burn to death. life sucks.

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So it's a more extreme pox situation. See off cow pox, which is easy and you're ok for small pox.

If you catch the plague but somehow manage to keep that bacterium out of the blood and lungs, very difficult I suspect, you "should" be ok when everyone around you is dying of plague.

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You need to read Daniel Defoe: "A journal of the plague year".

The pestilence appeared to lose it's virulence at the end, presumably, a number of people had sub-lethal encounters early on, survived them and became immune.

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Bubonic plague didn't just appear, wipe out lots of people and then vanish, it is still around today.

http://www.guardian....-bubonic-plague

If you take a look at something like

http://healthmap.org/en/

You begin to realise that at any point in time somewhere in the world there is someone dying of just about every nasty bug that has ever set up shop in the human body.

A quick scan and in the last 3 days we have had

Polio

Cholera

Legionnaires

Anthrax

Dengue Fever

Rabies

Malaria

Swine Flu

Bird Flu

African Swine Fever

Botulism

Syphilis

Plauge

Yellow Fever

Hantavirus

Norovirus

Parvovirus

and a bunch of undiagnosed nasties

Can't see Ebola, must be holiday this week.

That is not what I was saying. I assume there are no actual samples taken from these outbreaks hundreds of years ago ? If not then surely it is not 100% certain what they were ? Sure everything seemed the same as we see today. However what if it was something different with exactly the same symptoms/mortality etc.. ?

Just wondering how we can be 100% sure. Surely we can only ever be 99.9% certain without actual samples to compare ?

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I don't think we can ever be 100% sure.

What I thought. Can one of the Mmm...Beer King though shalt not be named people help us here ?

Either that or I am going google....

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Well I just googled and came up with a Wiki article.

Wiki

I know it's Wiki abd all. However it does seem all these plagues and everything - what they specifically were is nothing more than an educated guess ?

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I have read that book you flippin' idiot.

Nice temperate reply

Don't tell me what to do.

I didn't. I suggested (how am I to know if you'd read it?)

Look to your own back.

Why, are you planning to stab me?

Once again, you flippin'idiot.

Once again, have a good day

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What about beetroots? :blink:

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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