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http://swanlowpark.co.uk/bank0604.jsp

Savings rates after 20% tax have always outstripped RPI for the given year, see link.

Since 1985 in 24 years to 2009 £100.00 would be worth over £300.00, had it been held in a savings account and you had paid 20% tax.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AukZxRfCd2u5dDhYSVpuLTVNaHBtdjU3SUxycU9vcHc&hl=en_GB#gid=0

Apart from 2009 and 2006, but even so, cash easily stays with wages, and wage increments, well it has for the last 24 years.

All this crap regarding cash is trash, well if cash is trash so are wages in comparison to real cash, not numbers, not credit but stuff you can buy food with money, what you earn money, why you get up in the morning money.

Deflation in costs no, deflation in credit yes?

P

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I sort of agree with this but would have liked to have seen after tax earnings and housing costs on the same sheet. That might lead you to a different conclusion. I think you're underestimating past wage inflation - pre-1997

http://swanlowpark.co.uk/bank0604.jsp

Savings rates after 20% tax have always outstripped RPI for the given year, see link.

Since 1985 in 24 years to 2009 £100.00 would be worth over £300.00, had it been held in a savings account and you had paid 20% tax.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AukZxRfCd2u5dDhYSVpuLTVNaHBtdjU3SUxycU9vcHc&hl=en_GB#gid=0

Apart from 2009 and 2006, but even so, cash easily stays with wages, and wage increments, well it has for the last 24 years.

All this crap regarding cash is trash, well if cash is trash so are wages in comparison to real cash, not numbers, not credit but stuff you can buy food with money, what you earn money, why you get up in the morning money.

Deflation in costs no, deflation in credit yes?

P

Edited by fallingbuzzard

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http://swanlowpark.co.uk/bank0604.jsp

Savings rates after 20% tax have always outstripped RPI for the given year, see link.

Since 1985 in 24 years to 2009 £100.00 would be worth over £300.00, had it been held in a savings account and you had paid 20% tax.

https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AukZxRfCd2u5dDhYSVpuLTVNaHBtdjU3SUxycU9vcHc&hl=en_GB#gid=0

Apart from 2009 and 2006, but even so, cash easily stays with wages, and wage increments, well it has for the last 24 years.

All this crap regarding cash is trash, well if cash is trash so are wages in comparison to real cash, not numbers, not credit but stuff you can buy food with money, what you earn money, why you get up in the morning money.

Deflation in costs no, deflation in credit yes?

P

So, what are you saying?

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http://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc?key=0AvvVKsaB7vlZdHo3WHVzbzduNEwwQzNpZDJfZTNTanc&hl=en_GB&authkey=CJSM71c

1985 to 2009

Tax Rates have dropped from 30% to 20%

Personal Allowances have tripled

If you had £100 in an account in 1985 it would be worth £357.00 today after basic rate of tax

My wages have not gone up to the same extent, maybe just about doubled. This is why wages have not kept up with cash, we are working for less than ever?

P

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we are working for less than ever?
Do you remember the dark and middle ages? go to eyam in derbyshire where everyone died and look at the plaques on the houses, commemorating the people who died. You had tiny houses owned by the local lord, each tiny cottage housed 10->20 people, massive poverty, massive struggling, no ownership, you were owned by the lord. Essentially slavery by another name

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyam

these people were lucky to have work in the countryside, The towns and cities were even worse..

Edited by AteMoose

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Is it me or just coincidence but over the last 24 years that is 1985 to 2009, there seems to be a disconnect between wages and all else.

House prices have more than tripled.

A £100 in a savings account has more than tripled.

Your individual personal tax free allowance has tripled.

But.........................Wages, i doubt for many have not even doubled.

Its no wonder we are now at the point where interest rates are at an all time low. Wages relative to real costs are at a low, and have dropped off the pace of the cost of money, housing, living for the past 24 years.

Either wages start to rise, just cannot see it. Either house start to fall, very slow, very modest. Or we are in for 10 years of stagnation.

That is small falls in house prices, fall rises in interest rates, and small rates in wage inflation. How does 3% per annum sound. So rates peak at 3%, house prices fall by 3% per annum for ten years. Wages rise by 3% per annum over the next ten years?

P

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That is small falls in house prices, fall rises in interest rates, and small rates in wage inflation. How does 3% per annum sound. So rates peak at 3%, house prices fall by 3% per annum for ten years. Wages rise by 3% per annum over the next ten years?

P

If house prices look to be falling by less than money wasted on rent that I for one will be buying, im sure others will too. Therefore prices will rise creating a paradox :ph34r:

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  • 150 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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