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pl1

Panorama Now

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BBC1 now

Eighteen months after the great British banking crash, there are few visible changes on Britain's high streets. Most of the same old names are still there, and the banks are back to making handsome profits and equally handsome bonuses - rewarding themselves to the tune of 6 billion pounds in 2009.

Reporter Adam Shaw investigates the current state of Britain's high street banks, and reveals that while base rates remain low, the cost of borrowing for customers has risen significantly - with one bailed-out bank charging an effective interest rate in excess of 3,000 per cent - while small businesses are finding it just as hard to get a loan.

Edited by pl1

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Angry people - good.

Imagine how angry they'd be if a politician had the bottle to tell them the truth about money. Paying extortionate interest on money created from nothing.

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Angry people - good.

Imagine how angry they'd be if a politician had the bottle to tell them the truth about money. Paying extortionate interest on money created from nothing.

Shoot the heretic.

Money is created by clever financing types who understand the complexities of the money creation.

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It seems the bankers have created another scam, get a valuation done for a couple of hundred quid and then get the value too low so you don't qualify for the mortgage but hey we've pocketed the valuation fee.

Money for nothing.

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Made the point that that if you had a £10 overdraft then you'll get charged £1 a day giving you an interest rate of 3650% for the entire year.

What a stupid example...pathetic.

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Welsh idiot with the 4th kid on the way, wants to get out of his 1 bed place (I think that is right). He is ranting that Barclays told him they wanted a 15% deposit (he had an offer for a 5% deposit). He is angry that when he paid £300 to Halifax for a valuation report, they told him the house was worth less than he had offered, so they would not lend.....

Sure I feel sorry for him in a way, but ffs, it is a massive credit bubble and houses are totally over priced!!!!!!

Will the Panorama team manage to make the leap to the fact that after 300% HPI inflation in a decade, HOUSES ARE TOO EXPENSIVE??????????

Not so far, and I don't hold out much hope yet. Somebody please tell this idiot journalist, Adam Shaw, that prices are too high, and that the banks are saving us from ourselves as well as saving themselves.

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Adam Shaw left Working Luch, his mate A. Chiles has bug****d off to itv, seems to me he's struggling.

My halifax a/c charges £1 a day for an overdraft but I can go up to £2499 o/d for that. I don't, but it'd be good value if I had to.

Edited by deflation

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Nigel and his family...perfek :rolleyes:

I can't believe that this stuff is being broadcast on the beeb.

HPCers all...I reckon that we have won...

Somethin' or other.

:unsure:

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Made the point that that if you had a £10 overdraft then you'll get charged £1 a day giving you an interest rate of 3650% for the entire year.

I found that a bit of a stupid example. As if you're going to go £1 overdrawn for a whole year, knowing you'll get charged £1 a day. I assume the same would apply if you went 1p overdrawn, so they could have said it was 365000%!

At least this system means that if you go overdrawn accidently for a day (a more likely scenario, perhaps) you'll only be charged £1. I can remember being charged £27.50 for an unauthorised overdraft, even if it was only for a day! The £1 a day thing seems pretty straightforward to me, and as long as you keep an eye on your account it shouldn't cost you much.

Simple rule: Only spend what you have!

Perhaps it would be fairer for the banks to give people the option to prevent their accounts going below zero, if they don't want any fees - is that possible with a current account?

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The welsh guy doesnt know how lucky he is that no one will give him a mortgage.

He also said he had a secure tenancy council house...rare as hens teeth...would not throw that away in a hurry. ;)

Forgot to add...did I hear them say he wanted to buy a house for more than a professional valuer valued it for....madness.

Edited by winkie

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It seems the bankers have created another scam, get a valuation done for a couple of hundred quid and then get the value too low so you don't qualify for the mortgage but hey we've pocketed the valuation fee.

Money for nothing.

Well thats always been the case. However I thought the Halifax had done the guy a favour by telling him the house was not worth the money.

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Guest Noodle

What a stupid example...pathetic.

Not to some poor ******* stuck in that shylock situation.

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He also said he had a secure tenancy council house...rare as hens teeth...would not throw that away in a hurry. ;)

Forgot to add...did I hear them say he wanted to buy a house for more than a professional valuer valued it for....madness.

Thing was, it was valued at LESS than the price he haggled down to, 25% off the asking price which was just over £100k.

Edited by deflation

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He also said he had a secure tenancy council house...rare as hens teeth...would not throw that away in a hurry. ;)

Forgot to add...did I hear them say he wanted to buy a house for more than a professional valuer valued it for....madness.

Yes, and that's after he apparently negotiated 25% of the asking price!

I thought this might be a serious documentary, but it turned out to be a load of gimmicks, and sypathising for the poor people that the nasty banks wouldn't lend money to to buy over-priced houses.

Not much word on the poor savers, who are getting very little return for being sensible with their money.

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Not to some poor ******* stuck in that shylock situation.

Come on...who realistically would be £10 overdrawn for a whole year....they would deserve to pay £1 per day if they didn't have a tenner to put them back into the black.

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Guest Noodle

Come on...who realistically would be £10 overdrawn for a whole year....they would deserve to pay £1 per day if they didn't have a tenner to put them back into the black.

Fair enough. What about the 'pay day loans', similar levels of interest. We forget the situation many get into when they go skint. It's a trap.

Suddenly £10 is a fortune and £1 a day terminal. Does happen.

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Fair enough. What about the 'pay day loans', similar levels of interest. We forget the situation many get into when they go skint. It's a trap.

Suddenly £10 is a fortune and £1 a day terminal. Does happen.

That is something completely different....not to be recommended only to be used in an emergency, loans over a few days at extortionate rates of interest, not good.

I would say going back to the £10 overdrawn for a year...has to be someone who does not keep a check on their finances or open their statements or has moved addresses.

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Guest Noodle

That is something completely different....not to be recommended only to be used in an emergency, loans over a few days at extortionate rates of interest, not good.

I would say going back to the £10 overdrawn for a year...has to be someone who does not keep a check on their finances or open their statements or has moved addresses.

True enough. But I still don't see it's a bad example of bank greed and evil.

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Fair enough. What about the 'pay day loans', similar levels of interest. We forget the situation many get into when they go skint. It's a trap.

Suddenly £10 is a fortune and £1 a day terminal. Does happen.

Sure.....A packet of fags is now over £6.00. That is £0.33 per fag. Cut out 3 fags a day and you have covered the £........but you are not doing your duty by recapitalising the banks, and you are not paying off Gordon's debt either!

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Guest Noodle

Sure.....A packet of fags is now over £6.00. That is £0.33 per fag. Cut out 3 fags a day and you have covered the £........but you are not doing your duty by recapitalising the banks, and you are not paying off Gordon's debt either!

:blink::blink::blink:

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  • 315 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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