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smiffy1967

Destitute In Dubai: One Man's Story

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10637116

It was six o'clock in the morning when I met Nicholas Warner down by the Dubai Creek and already the temperature was 35C. We both knew that in a few hours it would climb to nearer 50C.

He eagerly showed me to a bench shaded by a palm tree that faced the waterfront so we could talk without getting burnt.

"Is this where you're sleeping at the moment?" I asked.

Nicholas has spent many nights sleeping in this park, located along the Dubai Creek

"Oh no," he replied. "It's not like England. You can't lie down on a bench and just sleep. You have to prop yourself upright and nod off or you'll attract unwanted attention or get moved on. I sleep on the ground behind that hedge, when I'm here."

And when he's not there?

"I started off in my car - but it's too hot for that now - you'd bake. Obviously, I can't afford petrol to keep the air con running.

"Then I was under a bridge. There's been a few days in a car park at a hotel. The manager there kindly took my clothes off me sometimes and washed them. He also let me use the shower after a guest checked out of a room."

But that all stopped when the hotel manager lost his job.

"So now I'll be back to washing in the public toilets."

'Debt skipper'

Nicholas Warner is British and sleeping on the street in Dubai. He got into a dispute with his bank, Emirates NBD, initially over whether his credit card repayments had been made.

Emirates NBD filed the case against Nicholas

He went on holiday at Christmas and the bank says that by leaving the country without its permission while they were in a dispute, he got reclassified as a so-called "debt skipper" - one of the many expats who left Dubai in a hurry with large debts, never to return.

Of course, Nicholas did return. When he arrived back at Dubai airport, he was arrested. His passport was seized by police on the authority of the bank.

Although he was released and tried to negotiate with the bank he got into further difficulties.

Brushes with the authorities are frowned upon in Dubai.

He had been working as a strategy adviser for an alternative medicine company, but his employer decided it was safer to let him go while he sorted everything out.

Now he had no job, no way to pay the debt the bank was demanding and no passport - leaving him with no way home.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10637116

It was six o'clock in the morning when I met Nicholas Warner down by the Dubai Creek and already the temperature was 35C. We both knew that in a few hours it would climb to nearer 50C.

He eagerly showed me to a bench shaded by a palm tree that faced the waterfront so we could talk without getting burnt.

"Is this where you're sleeping at the moment?" I asked.

Nicholas has spent many nights sleeping in this park, located along the Dubai Creek

"Oh no," he replied. "It's not like England. You can't lie down on a bench and just sleep. You have to prop yourself upright and nod off or you'll attract unwanted attention or get moved on. I sleep on the ground behind that hedge, when I'm here."

And when he's not there?

"I started off in my car - but it's too hot for that now - you'd bake. Obviously, I can't afford petrol to keep the air con running.

"Then I was under a bridge. There's been a few days in a car park at a hotel. The manager there kindly took my clothes off me sometimes and washed them. He also let me use the shower after a guest checked out of a room."

But that all stopped when the hotel manager lost his job.

"So now I'll be back to washing in the public toilets."

'Debt skipper'

Nicholas Warner is British and sleeping on the street in Dubai. He got into a dispute with his bank, Emirates NBD, initially over whether his credit card repayments had been made.

Emirates NBD filed the case against Nicholas

He went on holiday at Christmas and the bank says that by leaving the country without its permission while they were in a dispute, he got reclassified as a so-called "debt skipper" - one of the many expats who left Dubai in a hurry with large debts, never to return.

Of course, Nicholas did return. When he arrived back at Dubai airport, he was arrested. His passport was seized by police on the authority of the bank.

Although he was released and tried to negotiate with the bank he got into further difficulties.

Brushes with the authorities are frowned upon in Dubai.

He had been working as a strategy adviser for an alternative medicine company, but his employer decided it was safer to let him go while he sorted everything out.

Now he had no job, no way to pay the debt the bank was demanding and no passport - leaving him with no way home.

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

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I would rather be on the streets in the UK than in Dubai, the climate alone makes survival very difficult.

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Abroad is not Britain with different weather, FFS. If you're going to live in another country, it's a good idea to learn before you go about its laws, customs and attitudes. If this bloke had done that, he'd have known not to leave the country or, having left, not to go back.

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I loved this bit.

He had been working as a strategy adviser for an alternative medicine company, but his employer decided it was safer to let him go while he sorted everything out.

:lol:

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I don't think it's very funny. I feel sorry for him if true. Although there does seem to be more to this than meets the eye. Why doesn't he contact friends or family back home or even the British Embassy?

guy is stuck in dubai as he has had is passport confiscated and forced to live on the streets, i guess no different to those indian workers (aka slaves), who i bet he didn't give a feck about while he enjoyed the "lifestyle", no doubt he had a phillipino housemaid who he kept in similiar fashion.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-10637116

It was six o'clock in the morning when I met Nicholas Warner down by the Dubai Creek and already the temperature was 35C. We both knew that in a few hours it would climb to nearer 50C.

He eagerly showed me to a bench shaded by a palm tree that faced the waterfront so we could talk without getting burnt.

"Is this where you're sleeping at the moment?" I asked.

Nicholas has spent many nights sleeping in this park, located along the Dubai Creek

"Oh no," he replied. "It's not like England. You can't lie down on a bench and just sleep. You have to prop yourself upright and nod off or you'll attract unwanted attention or get moved on. I sleep on the ground behind that hedge, when I'm here."

And when he's not there?

"I started off in my car - but it's too hot for that now - you'd bake. Obviously, I can't afford petrol to keep the air con running.

"Then I was under a bridge. There's been a few days in a car park at a hotel. The manager there kindly took my clothes off me sometimes and washed them. He also let me use the shower after a guest checked out of a room."

But that all stopped when the hotel manager lost his job.

"So now I'll be back to washing in the public toilets."

'Debt skipper'

Nicholas Warner is British and sleeping on the street in Dubai. He got into a dispute with his bank, Emirates NBD, initially over whether his credit card repayments had been made.

Emirates NBD filed the case against Nicholas

He went on holiday at Christmas and the bank says that by leaving the country without its permission while they were in a dispute, he got reclassified as a so-called "debt skipper" - one of the many expats who left Dubai in a hurry with large debts, never to return.

Of course, Nicholas did return. When he arrived back at Dubai airport, he was arrested. His passport was seized by police on the authority of the bank.

Although he was released and tried to negotiate with the bank he got into further difficulties.

Brushes with the authorities are frowned upon in Dubai.

He had been working as a strategy adviser for an alternative medicine company, but his employer decided it was safer to let him go while he sorted everything out.

Now he had no job, no way to pay the debt the bank was demanding and no passport - leaving him with no way home.

So how is Dubai going to fill all those apartment blocks and huge hotels? By showing what a wonderful place it is to go to, except that you just might not be allowed out again! What a hell hole Dubai must be!

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I've never understood why anyone would want to go there even on holiday, let alone live there. Even putting the ridiculous heat aside and examples like the above, it's basically illegal to have fun there.

I think, more accurately, it's illegal to be caught having fun there. It doesn't have the rule of law in any way I would recognise it.

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I hear on the grapevine that the solution for people in his situation is to cross discretely overland from Dubai to Qatar, obtain temporary travel documents from the British Consulate in Doha and then get on a plane back to Blighty.

But I agree totally with the sentiments expressed above, specifically that one should take care to research and respect the natives' foibles of any foreign climb one proposes to visit (and especially to live and work in), and that having done so in the case of Dubai, anyone with any common sense is about as likely to want to go there as they are to want to appoint Raoul Moat to the board of trustees of a battered women's refuge.

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I've never understood why anyone would want to go there even on holiday, let alone live there. Even putting the ridiculous heat aside and examples like the above, it's basically illegal to have fun there.

My wife was travelling to Australia with here mother, sister and our young son last January and got a cheap deal on a 2 night stopover in Dubai as they were flying with Emirates. It was v. v. v. cold here in January so they thought 2 days in the sun, why the hell not.

The hotel was nice, the scale of the whole place was 'impressive' but one of the days they made the mistake of asking thier driver to drop them off without a male companion in town. They lasted about 10 mins before calling their driver back. Not so much 21st century attitudes to women as the prehistoric caveman variety.

Strange place, to see celebs fauning over the place on tv, even stranger.

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cross discretely overland from Dubai to Qatar

It appears to be quite a long way, and the border point looks insane. I guess you could take a desert route, but your going to have to go further, but what happens if you get caught? Seems insane

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  • 260 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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