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AteMoose

3 A At A Levels

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Poor lad, seems to think its because his application didnt have enough detail then had too much detail. Smell the coffee:

Drama and theatre studies

religious studies

English language and literature

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-10665478

Can you seriously do 'Drama and theatre studies' as an A Level.... Seriously there needs to be a proper change in the subjects taught in schools and it should be pointed out to these kids that they need to do a few proper subjects to have any chance of getting in to 'proper' Universities.

"He thinks now that both years, he was "a bit focused on the prestige" of the universities he chose."

One of them was Edinburgh. I would not be surprised that his choice of Mickey Mouse subjects was his downfall here. All 'A' grades are not treated equally. If he had done history/economicsor politics instead of his drama for example I bet he would have been accepted, but I expect both would have been deemed too much like hard work. Even religious studies would seen as marginable and you can probably only get away with one 'soft' subject.

Admissions staff get enough applications from people with top grades in the 'harder' disciplines, and the top Univiersites can pick and chose only the best - quite how Edinburgh let me in I am still wondering about ... ;)

Edited by lulu

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I can see a problem immediately.

Two of his A levels aren't what you would call "traditional academic A level subjects": this will be a factor in any Russell group admissions office for an over-subscribed course (and English is over-subscribed).

Basically, the lad is competing with people who will have straight A's in subjects such as history, a modern/ancient language, a science, maths ...

If he really wants to go to a good university to do English (which I personally wouldn't advise, nor would I advise going into journalism), he should probably use his free time to go to a local college and get another two A levels in traditional subjects.

Makes me wonder what sixth form tutors are advising kids to do these days. When I was in sixth form, it was known and understood that Theatre Studies was, more or less, a dead A level and would count for nothing.

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Poor lad, seems to think its because his application didnt have enough detail then had too much detail. Smell the coffee:

Drama and theatre studies

religious studies

English language and literature

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-10665478

Seems like a reasonable combination to do English lit. God knows what he wrote on his application to get rejected from every university 2 years running.

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It's not that bad. I'm sure he could get an interview for Theology at Oxbridge with that; but then the admission interview is down to him. Maybe Uni is not the right choice for him..

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"I know people who have gone to university who are still doing the same job that I've been doing - it makes you wonder what's the value of having a degree," he says.

And he still wants to go to uni! So close and yet so far.... I wonder if he's heard of the Open University.

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Seems like a reasonable combination to do English lit. God knows what he wrote on his application to get rejected from every university 2 years running.

My guess as an ex-admissions tutor is that his Personal Statement on his UCAS form had nothing to mark it out from all the others offering similar grades. On heavily over-subscribed courses that Personal Statement is crucial. 'I starred opposite Maggie Smith in Hamlet at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre'.. , or 'Tom Stoppard wants me to co-write..' would be the type of thing that might him on the 'Offer' pile on a prestige drama course.

Edited by juvenal

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My guess as an ex-admissions tutor is that his Personal Statement on his UCAS form had nothing to mark it out from all the others offering similar grades. On heavily over-subscribed courses that Personal Statement is crucial. 'I starred opposite Maggie Smith in Hamlet at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre'.. , or 'Tom Stoppard wants me to co-write..' would be the type of thing that might him on the 'Offer' pile on a prestige drama course.

As if those two paragraphs of shite a 17 year old scrawls on their UCAS form should be the decider in the situation.

This guy is clearly a halfwit, and therein lies the explanation.

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As if those two paragraphs of shite a 17 year old scrawls on their UCAS form should be the decider in the situation.

So what do you expect admissions tutors to do?

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So what do you expect admissions tutors to do?

just look at the A level subjects and projected grades, that tells you all you need to know about the person.

When I applied, I got offers from 7 uni's despite not being bothered to turn up for the interviews or inform them of the fact.

You could be Ian Huntley applying for teacher training, but if you have the right grades in the right subjects they will have you.

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It's the same as wealth. You're worth £1M now (your house is worth that alone) so you should be able to stroll into the trendy restaurant without a reservation.

Unlucky, everyone else is a millionaire too waiting in front of you. You're now back to becoming a nobody again.

Education - is it a zero sum game?

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I'm sure he could get an interview for Theology at Oxbridge with that; but then the admission interview is down to him. Maybe Uni is not the right choice for him..

Jings crivvens... pace lulu (big fan BTW. "Shout!") ... you used to be able to get into Edin. to do Divinity with 2 (or was it 3?) C's. At Higher! So is life really that hard the now, or is the "grade inflation" thing right on the money?

Sounds about right for a meenister, forbye. But the pension's not what it was.

Sorry, why does the loon wish to go to the university again?

Is it a career he has marked out for him?

I'd say he's best off well out of it, a mountain of debt to no purpose.

Away and get VSOing or something. Or try some crackpot Yankee religious college, that might even pay the fees :lol:

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As if those two paragraphs of shite a 17 year old scrawls on their UCAS form should be the decider in the situation.

Too simplistic. We don't know what his personal statement actually contained. I've seen some really powerful statements. They sure as hell weren't written by a scrawny 17 year old!

So what do you expect admissions tutors to do?

Quite. Especially on an English lit. type course where 3 As is the standard requirement.

It all hinges on that document. There's so little to differentiate the candidates. That's where the most effort should have gone - into creating a great statement that somebody enjoys reading.

Away and get VSOing or something. Or try some crackpot Yankee religious college, that might even pay the fees

Those uncredited Yankee colleges are the dogs! They'll give you a Ph.D. for reading tea-leaves.

Then go and write some nosh book about about dietary fads, and make an absolute killing. No names like - of course.

Education - is it a zero sum game?

Sure is. On one side we get the poor schmuk who's paid £30K for a piece of paper with the value of a used bus ticket.

And on the other we get a lardy smug vice-chancellor (and his mafiosi) earning 3 times the salary of the prime minister.

Having said all that - if the poor kid did get in somewhere, it's an awful lot better than being brow beaten into the ever increasing dole queue.

Sympathy for the kid. Ten knock backs and that fact plastered on the www.

Edited by cheval_à_bascule

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I can see a problem immediately.

Makes me wonder what sixth form tutors are advising kids to do these days. When I was in sixth form, it was known and understood that Theatre Studies was, more or less, a dead A level and would count for nothing.

When I was in the sixth form it was well understood that's where all the fit girls were.

So what do you expect admissions tutors to do?

Some sort of 'casting couch' approach.

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Those uncredited Yankee colleges are the dogs! They'll give you a Ph.D. for reading tea-leaves.

Then go and write some nosh book about about dietary fads, and make an absolute killing. No names like - of course.

I feel a mysterious urge to come round and speir after yer gillian m'Keech.

For a modest fee, naturally.

And mak sure it's in a Tupperware box.

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  This would never have happened if he'd taken A-level Maths, Physics, Chemistry, or a Chinese.

Drama and Theatre Studies doesn't count so he only has two A Levels; there used to be a General Studies A Level which also didn't count.

Selecting either of these, like doing a Media Studies degree, debars you from any propr job as you are clearly an idle waster who always takes the soft option.

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I must say that the article is too vague to be of much worth. About 3% of 18 years old get AAA at A-levels, yet he expects that this automatically qualifies him to go to Russel Group universities (number from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6949084.stm). Basically he is competing against students that have straight A's all across the board including at GCSE-level...and any admission-tutor will look at his other marks at A-levels (and probably GCSE) before looking at the statement. But the whole article contains no mention of those.

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It's become incredibly more difficult for admissions. With the significant increase in average grades, in no small part due to the more coursework based approach which I am not a fan of, it's very hard to differentiate candidates. So whats left? Well the subjects you studied obviously, and also the course you are applying for. If you choose a popular course then be prepared to fight and have disapointment. Courses are oversubscribed across the board, Radio 5 yesterday mentioned another surge to record highs this year.

What was wrong with Poly's and many people not even doing ALevels? Why does everyone expect Uni and why aren't the courses focused on the skills our country actually needs and uses, for example engineering and sciences. We were and just about still are the best talent in the world for these. The money should be focused on these, encouraging higher uptake. Move it away from the lesser 'easier' courses that offer no value to anyone including the students but often have the most students just because they are easy and sound trendy.

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It's become incredibly more difficult for admissions. With the significant increase in average grades, in no small part due to the more coursework based approach which I am not a fan of, it's very hard to differentiate candidates. So whats left? Well the subjects you studied obviously, and also the course you are applying for. If you choose a popular course then be prepared to fight and have disapointment. Courses are oversubscribed across the board, Radio 5 yesterday mentioned another surge to record highs this year.

What was wrong with Poly's and many people not even doing ALevels? Why does everyone expect Uni and why aren't the courses focused on the skills our country actually needs and uses, for example engineering and sciences. We were and just about still are the best talent in the world for these. The money should be focused on these, encouraging higher uptake. Move it away from the lesser 'easier' courses that offer no value to anyone including the students but often have the most students just because they are easy and sound trendy.

Being told by successive governments (not just NuLab) that this is what they should be doing.

I would also chuck in a combination of the housing boom and open borders. Men (in the main) who were good with their hands and had gone through an apprenticeship to become really good bricklayers, carpenters, electricians found they were competing for work through the late 90s and 00s with low wage east europeans; some good some bad. Either way the effect was that their skills became suddenly a lot less valuable and those careers a lot less attractive to young people who then started looking to get a degree to get into a better paid and more secure job.

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Being told by successive governments (not just NuLab) that this is what they should be doing.

I would also chuck in a combination of the housing boom and open borders. Men (in the main) who were good with their hands and had gone through an apprenticeship to become really good bricklayers, carpenters, electricians found they were competing for work through the late 90s and 00s with low wage east europeans; some good some bad. Either way the effect was that their skills became suddenly a lot less valuable and those careers a lot less attractive to young people who then started looking to get a degree to get into a better paid and more secure job.

Good points.

Does it come back to chasing the money? I remember my parents and grandparents didn't do that. They took jobs they could do that paid a fair wage. No getting rich or 'well paid' plans and they were happy enough.

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And he still wants to go to uni! So close and yet so far.... I wonder if he's heard of the Open University.

But he's 19. Not being funny but he'll never be surrounded by 2000+ 18-22 year old girls up for an experience in his life ever again.

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I must say that the article is too vague to be of much worth. About 3% of 18 years old get AAA at A-levels, yet he expects that this automatically qualifies him to go to Russel Group universities (number from: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/6949084.stm). Basically he is competing against students that have straight A's all across the board including at GCSE-level...and any admission-tutor will look at his other marks at A-levels (and probably GCSE) before looking at the statement. But the whole article contains no mention of those.

All this makes the choice of subjects studied even more key, where 'everyone' is getting straight A's one had better make sure that your A's are in subjects that are not deemed soft options or your application will go straight in the bin. Sadly for this guy, drama and religious studies just do not cut it not for English Literature at a top university.

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Good points.

Does it come back to chasing the money? I remember my parents and grandparents didn't do that. They took jobs they could do that paid a fair wage. No getting rich or 'well paid' plans and they were happy enough.

But it isn't a fair wage now unfortunately.

I know three craftsmen (brickie / stonemason, plasterer, general builder - though they can all do other things). All are now self-employed, two becoming that way through their employers going bust, so their income is dependent on getting work which isn't about.

In previous boom bust cycles they've made money in the boom years and that has tided them through the lean years, they know the industry is cyclical. This time they didn't get the good rates in the boom times because of the migrant workers so now they're scratching about for work (friends and families are bringing projects forward so they can do them) and struggling.

They won't be recommending it as a career choice.

My contrast is to Germany where there are proper career paths in most things you do and a degree of protection. Working in a pub there is a perfectly reasonable career choice, here it's a low paid easy way to earn a few quid if you're desperate.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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