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We've Had The Gardening Thread - What Are You Doing With Your Produce?

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We've had huge crops of raspberries and strawberries, so much so that I've had to resort to child labour and get the kids out every evening picking. I've just finished a batch of Strawberry & Raspberry Jam (a slug of balsamic vinegar makes all the difference) and am quite chuffed since in the past couple of years I've not found time to do anything more productive than slinging them in the freezer.

Next up is a bumper crop of blackcurrants and redcurrants: they've just started exploding, so I suspect more jam is on the cards for this evening.

Everything else is going to be rather later since we were late getting around to planting this year. Good to see the courgette pakora recipe on the courgette thread - that'll come in handy in a couple of weeks.

What are you doing with your crops?

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I popped a load of cherrys, made a pie and froze the remainder. There is another treeful which is about two weeks behind the first which I am planing to pick tommorow. Want to make jam.

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We've had huge crops of raspberries and strawberries, so much so that I've had to resort to child labour and get the kids out every evening picking. I've just finished a batch of Strawberry & Raspberry Jam (a slug of balsamic vinegar makes all the difference) and am quite chuffed since in the past couple of years I've not found time to do anything more productive than slinging them in the freezer.

Next up is a bumper crop of blackcurrants and redcurrants: they've just started exploding, so I suspect more jam is on the cards for this evening.

Everything else is going to be rather later since we were late getting around to planting this year. Good to see the courgette pakora recipe on the courgette thread - that'll come in handy in a couple of weeks.

What are you doing with your crops?

We have a similar jam mountain and the freezer is full to bursting, so much so that we are about to call into service an ancient one that lives in the garage!

The apple and plum trees are laden and we are thinking about getting a press or making one! They too will join the rest either as jam or frozen for future use during the winter.

The carrots look okay, but we`ll have to see whether or not they succumb to carrot fly.

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What are you doing with your crops?

Not my crops, the shops ones. My own are just those I can pick wild, of which blackberries are the only ones I'll get in sufficient quantity to do more than just eat.

But through the season of delicious produce, most of it goes three ways:

  1. Eat fresh

  2. Make into a dessert, e.g. fool, crumble, pie

  3. Stew and freeze, to have nice things (the basis for desserts) between the end of one year's blackberries and the start of next year's rhubarb.

Don't do (nor eat) jam, though I have been known to make chutney.

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Not my crops, the shops ones. My own are just those I can pick wild, of which blackberries are the only ones I'll get in sufficient quantity to do more than just eat.

But through the season of delicious produce, most of it goes three ways:

  1. Eat fresh

  2. Make into a dessert, e.g. fool, crumble, pie

  3. Stew and freeze, to have nice things (the basis for desserts) between the end of one year's blackberries and the start of next year's rhubarb.

Don't do (nor eat) jam, though I have been known to make chutney.

Recipe for the chutney please.

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I take the produce from my garden (grass cuttings and hedge clippings) to the local council for recycling as compost. I've done the vegetable growing thing in the past but it's not worth the effort when you can get the stuff cheap at the supermarket.

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I take the produce from my garden (grass cuttings and hedge clippings) to the local council for recycling as compost.  I've done the vegetable growing thing in the past but it's not worth the effort when you can get the stuff cheap at the supermarket.

Didn't you find that "home grown" tastes much nicer? We did.

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Eating it!

Crumbles are good but fruit salad with lots of cherries and berries at the moment.

I don't normally bother with jam and freezing stuff loses the lovely just picked taste so excess goes on the compost.

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D'oh and I had many many cucumbers too many in December, so I took the over stock to badminton and gave them away.

Unfortunately, since then, every week I attend one of the guys there asks me quite plaintively when I'm going to bring some more of my oh so wonderful cucumbers in. It wouldn't be so bad if he wasn't *quite* so camp... He's a wonderful bloke, but anyone who describes cucumbers as adorable in that precise tone of voice is going to make me giggle how ever hard I try not to!! He takes himself very seriously though, and I really don't want to hurt his feelings by laughing!

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Recipe for the chutney please.

Can't remember.

But I work on two general principles. If I'm confident with something, I'll just go ahead, without reference to any recipes (and try to make a mental note when a variant comes out better or worse than expected). If not, I'll google, browse several people's recipes, distill out the essentials (what all the recipes have in common), weight my thoughts towards a combination of what impresses me most and what I'm most comfortable with, and start from there. In either case, it'll be tailored to work with available ingredients.

In the case of chutney, I recollect googling, and stewing up a batch of blackberries and apples as if for jam but with different ingredients, most importantly vinegar in place of heavily-sugared water. Tasted gorgeous, but taught me a lesson about fully removing the apple skin (since it wasn't getting liquidised).

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D'oh and I had many many cucumbers too many in December, so I took the over stock to badminton and gave them away.

Hang on... are you Mrs D'oh?

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Right...

Onions - going into curries etc. Got some right monsters.

Peas - gone over now, many were eaten straight our the pod while gardening, yum. Some cooked, some kept for seed.

Radishes - hot as hell, but great in salads!

Potatoes - working through the rows, should last us till September

Lettuce - eaten in salads, ditto Spinach

Carrots - in progress

Beetroot - yum, nice in salad and will try making some Borscht soon

Tomatoes - still growing, we delayed planting them due to late frosts.

Strawberries - ditto

Damsons - just growing, must buy some Gin...

Courgettes - fattening nicely, will try OP's fried slice recipe. Incidentally, if you want to freeze them it is better to slice and fry first. Stops them going mushy.

Sweetcorn - got a block of 12 out, growing well

Rhubarb - try this. Takes 10 minutes to prepare and is heavenly.

Chives - got about £200 quids worth dotted about at Supermarket prices, using what we can.

Much of the above given to our pleasant neighbors. Really enjoyed the garden this year despite not having much time, going to really go for it next season.

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Right...

Onions - going into curries etc. Got some right monsters.

Peas - gone over now, many were eaten straight our the pod while gardening, yum. Some cooked, some kept for seed.

Radishes - hot as hell, but great in salads!

Potatoes - working through the rows, should last us till September

Lettuce - eaten in salads, ditto Spinach

Carrots - in progress

Beetroot - yum, nice in salad and will try making some Borscht soon

Tomatoes - still growing, we delayed planting them due to late frosts.

Strawberries - ditto

Damsons - just growing, must buy some Gin...

Courgettes - fattening nicely, will try OP's fried slice recipe. Incidentally, if you want to freeze them it is better to slice and fry first. Stops them going mushy.

Sweetcorn - got a block of 12 out, growing well

Rhubarb - try this. Takes 10 minutes to prepare and is heavenly.

Chives - got about £200 quids worth dotted about at Supermarket prices, using what we can.

Much of the above given to our pleasant neighbors. Really enjoyed the garden this year despite not having much time, going to really go for it next season.

Try chucking in a peeled beetroot in the roasting tray, with onion and spuds. Very nice, so long as you don't mind the purple stuff going everywhere.

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"she" was Miss D'oh.

In the traditional social model, one might infer a maiden name ;)

On a couple of other threads, you've said that you lived off £10 food for a month during a certain period of your life. I cannot get my tiny little brain around the concept, please could you expand?

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Nearly jam time!

Blackcurrant, redcurrant, whitecurrant, strawberry, raspberry, bramble, blueberry, gooseberry and wineberry!

The peas have been eaten, a late frost (in May!!!) killed the beans off, so they're well behind.

We've got potatoes, parsnips and fartichokes to pull up at some point, too.

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Right...

Courgettes - fattening nicely, will try OP's fried slice recipe. Incidentally, if you want to freeze them it is better to slice and fry first. Stops them going mushy.

...

This is really impressive - be interested to see what you do next year! Thanks for the courgette freezing tip - I'm going to try that since we have 5 varieties all ripening at once.

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got another tesco bag full of cherries :) They aren't as sweet from this tree but they needed picking as the wasps and birds were all over them

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Garlics been collected nice and dry, onions keeling over waiting their turn. Awash with cucmbers and tomatoes just now, lovely with basil. Finished all the strawberries, some made into jam to have with the later fruits, including their perpetual cousins growing in the greenhouse which will fruit until November. Fav breakfast, homemade bread, homemade strawberry jam, generous heap of fresh fruit (strawberries, plums, peaches, whatever's fruiting in the garden at the time) with a dollop of cream on top. No butter. Real coffee. Aaahh....

Heaps of mangetout and crispy French beans. We stir-fry them. Brilliant.

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On a couple of other threads, you've said that you lived off £10 food for a month during a certain period of your life. I cannot get my tiny little brain around the concept, please could you expand?

Well, if we limit ourselves to what you can buy in the shops (as opposed to gather in the hedgerows):

Pulses (e.g. lentils), 80p for a weeks worth of protein.

Bulk it out with Tescos economy pasta at 12p for a 500g pack.

£1.10 for a week's minimal food at 2002-3 prices.

At today's prices, lentils are about the same but pasta has risen hugely, so £1.10 becomes £1.80. Maybe even £2 if we add some slack.

Bit of a cheat: I had some herbs and spice around the place. And when feeling rich I could add things like onions and mushrooms to make it more interesting. In 2004 when my income started to rise, I could get all those things regularly, as well as fruit juice, booze (up to a point), and more expensive and varied foodstuffs in general.

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Well, if we limit ourselves to what you can buy in the shops (as opposed to gather in the hedgerows):

Pulses (e.g. lentils), 80p for a weeks worth of protein.

Bulk it out with Tescos economy pasta at 12p for a 500g pack.

£1.10 for a week's minimal food at 2002-3 prices.

At today's prices, lentils are about the same but pasta has risen hugely, so £1.10 becomes £1.80. Maybe even £2 if we add some slack.

Bit of a cheat: I had some herbs and spice around the place. And when feeling rich I could add things like onions and mushrooms to make it more interesting. In 2004 when my income started to rise, I could get all those things regularly, as well as fruit juice, booze (up to a point), and more expensive and varied foodstuffs in general.

So basically it hinges around a 500g (?) pkt of lentils and 1.5kg (?) of pasta a week with what ever else you can forage, add cheaply?

Presumably you lost weight? Any short term (poor) health effects? I'm just wondering how long you can last on this whilst still functioning fully. Certainly puts into perspective what most people would think as cutting down on what they eat.

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  • 153 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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