Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

kudukid

A Foreign Guide To The Uk

Recommended Posts

"England is a nation of overweight, binge-drinking reality TV addicts" - Rough Guide to England, 8th Edition – published in over 200 countries

More here:

http://uk.travel.yahoo.com/p-promo-3312457

The picture of the fish and chips has made me very hungry. Stereotypes - designed to wind up those portrayed........don't take t5he bait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
the weather is shit

To be sure this US writer doesn't hail from North Dakota.

Actually is there any part of the US that doesn't suffer from extremes of (a) hurricanes, (B) earthquakes, © droughts, (d) blizzards, (e) floods...???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chill out, I think the article is pointing out just how much premium grade ******** most of these guides are full of, for instance:

""From the lowliest 'caff' (cafeteria) in the working-class districts of Birmingham to the Queen's posh Buckingham Palace suite, class tradition melts at four o'clock every afternoon as the nation pauses to partake of its most beloved ritual: Afternoon Tea." - Frommer's England 2010, published in the USA "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work as a travel writer and guidebook author. More often than not I was writing about places I had never been to or had visited only briefly in the long-distant past. Most of my information was sieved from websites and guidebooks, then boiled down and rewritten. I was very good at it. There were, of course, instances when I would write from first-hand experience and then it was always amusing to spot my words reappearing in someone else's article or guidebook some months later.

What you are getting from this Yahoo article is a snapshot of British stereotypes; the national brand if you will. It is very unlikely to be based on the first-hand experience of the author. Not that this isn't an illuminating read all the same. Tourism is driven by stereotypes. In reality the claim that all British food is bad is as inaccurate as the claim that all French food is good (it certainly isn't) but there is an element of truth in each generalisation - not that truth matters to most tourists. Personally I think the numerous contradictory stereotypes about the British should be celebrated. It shows we have far more to offer than the cardboard cut-out brands dreamed up by the marketing teams of national tourist boards around the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In reality the claim that all British food is bad is as inaccurate as the claim that all French food is good (it certainly isn't)

Indeed, but the French really can't see it. It is one of their national failings.

I was once part of a group of diverse nationalities being entertained by our French subsidiary at a Posh Parisienne restuarant. Something like this came out as the set meal (except it was worse to see up close and personal, and far, far worse to actually try and eat) - all the unspeakable bits of the animal seemed to be represented, without a single honest green vegetable to be seen. It was a real stomach turning experience for everyone not French. The French people there put on their haughtiest, most condescending Parisian faces, of course, in response to our reactions.

783px-Choucroute-p1030190.jpg

post-11428-12791006741697_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work as a travel writer and guidebook author. More often than not I was writing about places I had never been to or had visited only briefly in the long-distant past. Most of my information was sieved from websites and guidebooks, then boiled down and rewritten. I was very good at it. There were, of course, instances when I would write from first-hand experience and then it was always amusing to spot my words reappearing in someone else's article or guidebook some months later.

I've noticed that in Lonely Planet guides for some of the areas I've travelled in. I've often suspected that the information is second-hand so I take guide books with a pinch of salt now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you are getting from this Yahoo article is a snapshot of British stereotypes; the national brand if you will. It is very unlikely to be based on the first-hand experience of the author.

You could at least have looked at the Yahoo article before you commented on it... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

783px-Choucroute-p1030190.jpg

That looks horrific. When I looked at that, i could 'hear' my teeth squeeking against the rubbery flesh. And what the hell is it served on? a bed of brain?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could at least have looked at the Yahoo article before you commented on it... :rolleyes:

You misunderstand. I am saying the opinions about the UK expressed by the quoted authors in the article (Frommers, Rough Guide etc) are unlikely to be based on their first-hand experience, or at least are likely to be wild generalisations based on whistle-stop visits to Central London. That's just the way guidebook publishing works these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You misunderstand. I am saying the opinions about the UK expressed by the quoted authors in the article (Frommers, Rough Guide etc) are unlikely to be based on their first-hand experience, or at least are likely to be wild generalisations based on whistle-stop visits to Central London. That's just the way guidebook publishing works these days.

Yes, but the Yahoo article is ridiculing the nonsense that comes from the guidebooks. I think anyone who has ever read a guidebook and compared it to their own experience should be aware of their shortcomings. But then, there is a substantial proportion of the population (and the posters on this site it would seem), who think that if something appears in print, it must be true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Noodle

Slough, England

"A town so bereft of anything interesting it very nearly belies belief."

Helsinki, Finland

"Helsinki combines the old-world charm of a McDonald's drive-thru with the dynamic pace of a retirement home bridge night."

Sanaa, Yemen

"With the strict Islamic laws of Saudi, the crime levels of South America and the poverty of underdeveloped parts of Africa, Yemen has everything you could wish to avoid in a travel destination."

La Paz, Bolivia

"Andean pipe music was discovered here by an elevator designer on annual leave, and is as good a reason for staying away as any."

Edmonton, Canada

"Anyone who says Canada is a duller, colder, more expensive version of the US doesn't know what they're talking about . . . or is talking about Edmonton."

Copenhagen, Denmark

"When Shakespeare's greatest hero labels somewhere a prison, it's got to be worth avoiding."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Edmonton, Canada
Hmmm, know somone who lives 6 hours drive away from Edmonton, its there nearest city/town, its where they go when they need to buy most things you would expect to be able to buy but can't, or if they need the local airport ... Is it that bad?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Noodle

Hmmm, bro lives 7 hours away from Edmonton, its there nearest city... Is it that bad?

Apparently.

Half of my lot live in Winnipeg, desperately dull place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks horrific. When I looked at that, i could 'hear' my teeth squeeking against the rubbery flesh. And what the hell is it served on? a bed of brain?

Choucroute is a dish of cabbage and various cuts of pork. It is a Parisian speciality and I love it ! I'm not French, but do admire their culture and cuisine (not the people so much). Not all French food is good, but where they still have a major advantage over us is in the mid-market £20-£30 per head type of restaurant, the food is invariably of a higher standard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Choucroute is a dish of cabbage and various cuts of pork. It is a Parisian speciality and I love it ! I'm not French, but do admire their culture and cuisine (not the people so much). Not all French food is good, but where they still have a major advantage over us is in the mid-market £20-£30 per head type of restaurant, the food is invariably of a higher standard.

+1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Noodle

Choucroute is a dish of cabbage and various cuts of pork. It is a Parisian speciality and I love it ! I'm not French, but do admire their culture and cuisine (not the people so much). Not all French food is good, but where they still have a major advantage over us is in the mid-market £20-£30 per head type of restaurant, the food is invariably of a higher standard.

For £30 I can feed you on cabbage and pork all month. No problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For £30 I can feed you on cabbage and pork all month. No problem.

I do like those little pork meatballs you get from the street vendors in Thailand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Noodle

I do like those little pork meatballs you get from the street vendors in Thailand.

I don't.

It's disgusting. It's raw. It's diseased. It can be fatal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.