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Top 10 Incapacity Benefits Facts

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1. The claimant count has more than trebled from 700,000 in the late 1970s, costing the Treasury about £12.5bn a year.

2. About 40 per cent suffer from a mental illness or bad nerves. They are half as likely to find work as someone with a physical disability.

3. Around 40 per cent of existing claimants are “self certified”.

4. The rejection rate has risen from around 35 per cent under to old test to 68 per cent under the new regime. The new test has only applied to new applicants but 40 per cent of them had claimed sickness benefit in the past.

5. Almost half of the 2.5m claimants are over the age of 50. Some 900,000 claimants are expected to die or take the state pension before the re-testing drive is complete.

6.The new test is projected to push more than a million claimants on the dole, steadily increasing the jobless claimant count to 3m by 2014.

7. Ethnic minorities represent just 6 per cent of claimants even though they represent 12 per cent of working population.

8. Around 5.5 per cent of claimants find a job every year. But there is no requirement to do so.

9. After a year on the benefit, the average length of claim is eight years. After two years on the benefit, a claimant is more likely to die or retire than find work.

10. The new test is expected to cut the cost of sickness benefits by around £1.5bn by the end of the parliament. But it will be difficult to find more savings, at least without cutting the level of benefit payments.

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2. About 40 per cent suffer from a mental illness or bad nerves. They are half as likely to find work as someone with a physical disability.

So is that 0.01% with a mental illness and 39.99% with "bad nerves" or the other way around? What the ****** is "bad nerves"

That could well be the stupidest statistic i've ever seen, and competition for that particular accolade is pretty ******ing stiff based on the god-awful turgid standard of journalism that's around these days.

Arsedribble.

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I can`t work because I suffer from the disease "Fear From Exerting Myself" and demand a £2 million house where the DWP should pay me Housing Benefit for the rent, pay my council tax and give me benefits to pay the excessive utility bills as my wife feels the cold even when the temperature is 30 degrees, pay to support my 5 children, give me a car to take said children to school and have my food delivered by Tesco settling the account. :rolleyes:

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Its a bit sick the greedy bankers having a go at the sick and mentally ill.

But I am not suprised. Maybe it was the mentally ill that caused the banking crises and the recession?

Yes I think it must have been.

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Its a bit sick the greedy bankers having a go at the sick and mentally ill.

But I am not suprised. Maybe it was the mentally ill that caused the banking crises and the recession?

Yes I think it must have been.

That's what's in question though isn't it?

£60 dole or £90 incapacity benefit; big difference so why should an honest well person get £30 less than a dishonest one who claims to be unfit to work but is perfectly well?

If they're genuinely unable to work it won't get taken away.

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Its a bit sick the greedy bankers having a go at the sick and mentally ill.

But I am not suprised. Maybe it was the mentally ill that caused the banking crises and the recession?

Yes I think it must have been.

l.o.l. :P

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3. Around 40 per cent of existing claimants are “self certified”.

Only short term Statutory Sick Pay is self certified (ie the first 7 days of incapacity).

After that date all claims have to be covered by a doctors certificate

http://www.turn2us.org.uk/information__resources/benefits/incapacity_benefit.aspx

Your incapacity benefit totals therefore assume that 40% of claims relate to short term sickness absence

I dont know which is sadder, the fact that you post such drivel on this site or that some people believe it.

Edited by realcrookswearsuits

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7. Ethnic minorities represent just 6 per cent of claimants even though they represent 12 per cent of working population.

What do the BNPers think to that then eh? Come, I can't wait to hear the tortured logic....

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If they're genuinely unable to work it won't get taken away.

Oh yes it will...

'Flawed benefit system classifies terminally ill man 'fit for work'':

http://www.guardian....apacity-benefit

People with advanced Parkinson's Disease or Multiple Sclerosis, with severe mental illness, or awaiting open heart surgery have been registered as fit to work, according to the report by the Citizens Advice Bureau.

Many observers and politicians seem to think that claimants can be divided into defined groups: the fit and the unfit, the willing to work and the unwilling to work. In the real world it's not like that. Every claimant is an individual with their own problems and limitations. Thus there is a frequency distribution of fitness to work, probably approximating to a normal (bell) curve. The decision point naturally gravitates towards the centre of that curve where the government can maximise its influence (and those operating the system maximise their employment and bonus opportunities). Consequently, the majority of claimants will be clustered around that mid-point and many decisions are borderline, arbitary, and unjust.

Edited by CrashConnoisseur

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7. Ethnic minorities represent just 6 per cent of claimants even though they represent 12 per cent of working population.

Without knowing, at least, the claimant's age profiles and former occupations this is a meaningless statistic.

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Hummm ... I see this quite differently.

For a start, I know people on IB who have utterly taken the piss for years, but they have often been people who originally had a physical condition of some sort -- bad back, that sort of thing -- that got better, but they just kept on with the IB.

The people I know who have claimed IB for mental health reasons ... well, I am not so sure. I think the problem is far more complex and far more wide ranging than just "claiming for depression or anxiety to avoid work".

The people I know (both men and women) who have claimed IB for depression and anxiety disorders have often originally been very conscientious, hard-working, intelligent, bright workers who've had their world view and sense of self and reality smashed to pieces by the increasing insanity of our modern society, culture and workplace.

In almost all the cases I know about personally, the problem was caused by irrational and unacceptable situations in the workplace: trying to run a key service with staff that refused to do any work, managers that were corrupt and ideologically obssessed with strange concepts, complete incompetence on the part of colleagues, being exposed to individuals that were just something else entirely ... and these people just cracked up. And they did crack up, believe me. There's only so much someone can take, particularly if they are a conscientious person. These people took sick leave after a breakdown and ended up on IB, and they just could not function as human beings even for a good two years.

And I see this issue everywhere now. The sheer amount of young people with rather serious mental health issues is frightening; they just can't compute the environment of modern Britain, and who can blame them?

We have a mental health epidemic in Britain, and most of it is because we exist in a modern environment that is inhuman and impossible to comprehend by any sane standards. We live in an insane country, and then wonder why so many people have mental health problems.

Members of my family and friends work and have worked in fields (NHS, law and order, social work) where the rate of mental health problems amongst workers in that field is very high. And believe me, I understand it because you'd have to be brain dead for some things you see and experience not to bother you to the point it shatters your mind into fragments.

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6.The new test is projected to push more than a million claimants on the dole, steadily increasing the jobless claimant count to 3m by 2014.

It will have no impact on the number of people jobless. None.

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It will have no impact on the number of people jobless. None.

+1

Why does it cost more to live if your on incapacity benefit than if your out of work and job seeking?

Surely actively looking for work, internet searches, letters, travel to interviews, job centres, work fairs, etc, costs money.

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90 quid a week for being sick isn't much. I can see a lot of people rushing to sign well and become headteachers in inner city london.

I know a lot of people who've had depression - and you can't work when it's at it's worse but people get better and shouldn't spend forever on the sick.

I know people with chronic conditions who have more of a life than me though and are certainly able to do sit down office jobs if their co-workers don't mind them moaning about how crap they feel some days.

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Hummm ... I see this quite differently.

For a start, I know people on IB who have utterly taken the piss for years, but they have often been people who originally had a physical condition of some sort -- bad back, that sort of thing -- that got better, but they just kept on with the IB.

One of the main reasons I got out of working in an office is my back. I can do the work, but not if some pusillanimous office manager insists on my sitting at a desk and chair that bugger up my posture because that's what we use here. Probably should've claimed incapacity for that ...

I'm sure there's a whole spectrum, ranging from those with severe medical conditions through to those extracting the micturation. In the middle of that are people whose problems arise at least in part from the actions of others, like thoughtless office managers or workplace bullies.

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A friend of mine said he'd seen an interesting statistic which suggested that the number of IB claimants in a geographical region (e.g. a parliamentary constituency) tends to be in proportion to the total number of benefit claimants.

I would've expected that the number of people who are medically 'unfit to work' would be relatively fixed irrespective of where in the country you are and what proportion of the local population are on benefits of any kind.

Has anyone else here heard of such a thing, or perhaps have seen any official figures to confirm this?

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My youngest brother used to be on incapacity benefit. He was diagnosed with cancer when he was 37 and had (I lost count) about 20 operations (some of which were bloody awful, the stuff of nightmares) and endless chemo and radiotherapy. He had all sorts of things cut off and cut out - and lasted until he was almost 50.

He couldn't work because he was in constant pain and could barely walk. His condition used to go up and down and when it was up, he used to apply for jobs. He applied once to be a wedding registrar for some council - but I guess the constant treatment and operations meant no employer would touch him with a bargepole.

He was too proud to take help directly, so I used to have to be sneaky. When he was really on his uppers I used to get food delivered to him on my Tesco account and then the bill would never get mentioned.

Anyway, a lot of the time, he lived on beans on toast. His income from benefits was derisory - going round to his flat was like going to my Grandad's when I was a kid - jars on a shelf marked Gas and Electricity full of coins set aside for the bill.

The point of this diatribe is ... it makes me really angry when I think of all the scrounging, parasitical b a s t a r d s on incapacity benefit who are cheating the system. It means that people who genuninely need help live in Dickensian poverty.

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+1

Why does it cost more to live if your on incapacity benefit than if your out of work and job seeking?

Surely actively looking for work, internet searches, letters, travel to interviews, job centres, work fairs, etc, costs money.

Because if you are on incapacity benefit you are, by definition, in a long term situation. If you are out of work, you are between jobs, you should have a bit of money saved up from your last job to tide you over until the next one. It's the 'drip, drip, drip' effect of long term incapacity that gets you ... when the washing machine breaks and the only way you can get a new one is 'on the club' ... so that's another £2.45 a week out of your £60 gone for 3 years.

Trust me, it builds up and the poverty just gets worse.

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The Disability legislation (now the Equality Act) had at its heart the aspiration to remove the barriers which prevented disabled people getting into work.

With just a few exceptions, this has not been true.

The NHS has a fairly good record of engaging a racially diverse workforce, but they do not recruit people with disabilities as they should.

Until employers open their recruitment to disabled people an assault on disability benefits is unjustifiable.

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What do the BNPers think to that then eh? Come, I can't wait to hear the tortured logic....

They are the only ones that can get jobs? OK I'm not a BNP'er just playing devils advocat! :P

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What the ****** is "bad nerves"

That could well be the stupidest statistic i've ever seen, and competition for that particular accolade is pretty ******ing stiff based on the god-awful turgid standard of journalism that's around these days.

Arsedribble.

Probably stress related. France is probably the best cure. I noted quite a few former public sector workers suffering stress related illness (policemen, teachers etcc) and others doing up barns in the Charente. So thats obviously a good cure then.

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A friend of mine said he'd seen an interesting statistic which suggested that the number of IB claimants in a geographical region (e.g. a parliamentary constituency) tends to be in proportion to the total number of benefit claimants.

I would've expected that the number of people who are medically 'unfit to work' would be relatively fixed irrespective of where in the country you are and what proportion of the local population are on benefits of any kind.

Has anyone else here heard of such a thing, or perhaps have seen any official figures to confirm this?

I can't comment on if that's true or not. But it'd make sense if many of the IB claimants had industrially related diseases from heavy industry, coal mining, textiles etc as the areas where they were traditionally strong employers are generally the most deprived.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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