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Monopoly

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Ever try the new monopoly, where you no longer have notes but a kind of calculator that uses plastic cards to mark debits and credits. Yes, that's right - the supply of currency is effectively in the hands of a child who just makes up the figures as he goes along! Utter chaos. And a perfect metaphor for the mess we're in.

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Ever try the new monopoly, where you no longer have notes but a kind of calculator that uses plastic cards to mark debits and credits. Yes, that's right - the supply of currency is effectively in the hands of a child who just makes up the figures as he goes along! Utter chaos. And a perfect metaphor for the mess we're in.

No, but I've seen it. Great to get kids used to PIN entry/swiping, great for their credit cards later!

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Check out the essay in here: http://www.landandliberty.net/uploads/landl1227.pdf called 'Monopoly’s Hidden History'

Originally designed as a pro land tax educational game by a quaker.

Yes, it's the perfect demonstration of the perils of land ownership.

If you allow property speculation, regardless of how much wages you earn, there is only ever one result. One person has all the money, everyone else is bankrupt.

Try the same game, but add in a 10% Land Value Tax every 5 turns and see what happens. :P

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Yes, it's the perfect demonstration of the perils of land ownership.

If you allow property speculation, regardless of how much wages you earn, there is only ever one result. One person has all the money, everyone else is bankrupt.

Try the same game, but add in a 10% Land Value Tax every 5 turns and see what happens. :P

The tax man will win in 50 turns.

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Ever try the new monopoly, where you no longer have notes but a kind of calculator that uses plastic cards to mark debits and credits. Yes, that's right - the supply of currency is effectively in the hands of a child who just makes up the figures as he goes along! Utter chaos. And a perfect metaphor for the mess we're in.

Your average game of classic Monopoly is a better education than a semester of economics 101. The banker invariably steals money or passes it onto his/her friends. Money gets concentrated in a few hands, mainly through luck and chance. The winners want to keep playing the game so bribe the losers with credit and loans, but only enough credit to keep them playing, but not enough to ever dig themselves out of the hole and challenge the winners position of complete control. Eventually, the sharks get tired of circling and foreclose, taking all the mortgaged properties in one fell swoop. People play for a little longer out of politeness as the winner(s) gloat and deal amongst themselves, excluding the others who are just there for the cheap thrill they provide as they land (yet again) on a hotel on Mayfair, or for that matter on a hovel in Old Kent Road. Alternatively, one of the peasants can get uppity and overturn the board in a fit of revolutionary ire. The "winners" always seem angered and confused by this, but never see that perhaps they were partly to blame for the demise of the game they cherished. Usually, the revolutionary shoulders the blame, is victimised and informed that s/he is a bad sport, and beaten when mummy and daddy are out of sight and sound.

Monopoly was created as an tool to educate about the dangers of unrestrained capitalism. (Well, Wikipedia say: Monopoly is a redesign of an earlier game "The Landlord's Game" first published by the Quaker and political activist Elizabeth Magie. The purpose of that game was to teach people how monopolies end up bankrupting the many whilst giving extraordinary wealth to one or few individuals. It was meant to promote Georgism, which some of the posters on here might appreciate.) Which just goes to show that people don't pay attention. The information can be put right in front of them. They will even experience the dynamics, but the application to their own situation will never twig. It's just a game, innit?

Given this, I reckon the addition of credit cards is absolutely perfect. I've never played the modern version. I wonder whether the credit means people spend more freely and the game goes on longer before people realise they are well and truly shafted? Are you allowed to go negative with these cards?

Edited by D'oh

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Your average game of classic Monopoly is a better education than a semester of economics 101. The banker invariably steals money or passes it onto his/her friends. Money gets concentrated in a few hands, mainly through luck and chance. The winners want to keep playing the game so bribe the losers with credit and loans, but only enough credit to keep them playing, but not enough to ever dig themselves out of the hole and challenge the winners position of complete control. Eventually, the sharks get tired of circling and foreclose, taking all the mortgaged properties in one fell swoop. People play for a little longer out of politeness as the winner(s) gloat and deal amongst themselves, excluding the others who are just there for the cheap thrill they provide as they land (yet again) on a hotel on Mayfair, or for that matter on a hovel in Old Kent Road. Alternatively, one of the peasants can get uppity and overturn the board in a fit of revolutionary ire. The "winners" always seem angered and confused by this, but never see that perhaps they were partly to blame for the demise of the game they cherished. Usually, the revolutionary shoulders the blame, is victimised and informed that s/he is a bad sport, and beaten when mummy and daddy are out of sight and sound.

Monopoly was created as an tool to educate about the dangers of unrestrained capitalism. (Well, Wikipedia say: Monopoly is a redesign of an earlier game "The Landlord's Game" first published by the Quaker and political activist Elizabeth Magie. The purpose of that game was to teach people how monopolies end up bankrupting the many whilst giving extraordinary wealth to one or few individuals. It was meant to promote Georgism, which some of the posters on here might appreciate.) Which just goes to show that people don't pay attention. The information can be put right in front of them. They will even experience the dynamics, but the application to their own situation will never twig. It's just a game, innit?

Given this, I reckon the addition of credit cards is absolutely perfect. I've never played the modern version. I wonder whether the credit means people spend more freely and the game goes on longer before people realise they are well and truly shafted? Are you allowed to go negative with these cards?

Great description. Thanks.

Not sure if you're allowed to exceed credit limits.

In the modern version, the game usually break up in a panic after about an hour because the player with the reddest face has just charged into the kitchen to fetch a big knife ...

Edited by okaycuckoo

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My brother and I made credit cards for Monopoly one long summer in the early eighties, to keep the game going. It stopped being about winning, but laughing at the enormous cc bills we were racking up. We felt like millionaires. I don't think the game ever ended, we just went back to school. .

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  • 258 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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