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Jonnybegood

Doom And Gloom At The Local Last Night

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I have always reported back on the good and the bad, trying to give a balanced view on the form, others it seem just what to hear only about housing market crashes and any thing just does not fit.

Last night at the local a few of the local builders were out in force, wives in tow the lot.

Over the past 5- 8 years I have seen these guys go from strength to strength, no longer driving around in old transit vans but newly new top of the range pick up trucks and owning nice cars as well.

Anyhow when back in 2008 the first credit crunch hit these guys were not to bothered as many had 6 months worth of work ahead of them and to be fair the time it all started to pick back up again very few of them actually felt any recession at all.

However last night the mood was different, they do not seem as relaxed about future work as they did back in 2008.

There was one who has been doing building work in the area for the past 25 years and he was quite openly telling everyone last night that an £85k extension he had lined up for august is not going to go ahead, the guy who does shredding of confidential paperwork for the local authority has been told his contract will be reviewed in September and he feels that its going to be bad news, either he is going to lose the contract or be squeezed heavily.

There were quite a few jobs being put on hold with local authority workers, they seem to think that the axe is going to fall heavily and already tightening their belts on unnecessary expenditure.

Basically the general feeling was they can no longer rely on the public sector worker to provide them with work as they did last year, most have work until the end of August but then very little at the moment.

Not saying this is the general picture for all the uk, but these guys are established builders with good names and many been through downturns before, but there seems to be worry amongst them at the moment, not that work will disappear all together but perhaps the prices they charge will need to drop in order to compete and that their current lifestyle off the back of that will need to adjust to the new era of austerity measures.

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Yup. There are a lot of people working in the "private" sector whose livelihoods are impacted by "public sector" cuts. The next 5-7 years are going to be nasty.

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Yup. There are a lot of people working in the "private" sector whose livelihoods are impacted by "public sector" cuts. The next 5-7 years are going to be nasty apocalyptic.

Corrected for effect.

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It is not a good time to be in the building / maintenance trades. Three of my local firms have gone bust in the last two years and the self-employed people I know (about half a dozen of which two I know well) are mostly scraping-by doing work for friends and family who are bringing forward things they want doing in order to help them out.

It's a shame as, unlike in the OP, these are not people who were throwing money around a couple of years back though they were earning a reasonable wage.

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i) - Private sector - many areas of the private sector have been on their **** for years - if not the best part of the decade.

ii) - PrivatePublic sector jobs - those private sector jobs that have been almost totaly reliant on public sector largesse and almost unlimited budgets have been living the life of riley the last ten years - that is coming to an end.

iii) Construction - Public sector funding construction has been well overpropped for a decade. Private sector construction - feeddin gof the boom but each stage the volumes have shrunk - with the disappearance of landgrabbing and the possibility of even tighter local nimby control of new space expect new construction jobs to be decimated (and) more - you don't need any construction employees for jobs that cannot and will not go ahead. Worse the new artificial bubble is crimping the supply of movers and upgraders - people spend the most when they move inot a different house, not one which they are already.

Not surprised the builders are unhappy, going to get hit from all sides.

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I have always reported back on the good and the bad, trying to give a balanced view on the form, others it seem just what to hear only about housing market crashes and any thing just does not fit.

Last night at the local a few of the local builders were out in force, wives in tow the lot.

Over the past 5- 8 years I have seen these guys go from strength to strength, no longer driving around in old transit vans but newly new top of the range pick up trucks and owning nice cars as well.

Anyhow when back in 2008 the first credit crunch hit these guys were not to bothered as many had 6 months worth of work ahead of them and to be fair the time it all started to pick back up again very few of them actually felt any recession at all.

However last night the mood was different, they do not seem as relaxed about future work as they did back in 2008.

There was one who has been doing building work in the area for the past 25 years and he was quite openly telling everyone last night that an £85k extension he had lined up for august is not going to go ahead, the guy who does shredding of confidential paperwork for the local authority has been told his contract will be reviewed in September and he feels that its going to be bad news, either he is going to lose the contract or be squeezed heavily.

There were quite a few jobs being put on hold with local authority workers, they seem to think that the axe is going to fall heavily and already tightening their belts on unnecessary expenditure.

Basically the general feeling was they can no longer rely on the public sector worker to provide them with work as they did last year, most have work until the end of August but then very little at the moment.

Not saying this is the general picture for all the uk, but these guys are established builders with good names and many been through downturns before, but there seems to be worry amongst them at the moment, not that work will disappear all together but perhaps the prices they charge will need to drop in order to compete and that their current lifestyle off the back of that will need to adjust to the new era of austerity measures.

Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

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Guest Noodle

Yup.

Three emails last week from old colleagues, first 'wondering where I am and what I'm up to?'. This rapidly reverts to 'FFS, when are you coming back?' to 'there's no work, find me a job' or 'come back and sort this out and get us some work in'.

Well, there's sod all I can do about it and all I can recommend is a few job websites and an ebay link to hammocks and slippers.

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Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

obviously a very well paid and important job :rolleyes:

perhaps there is nothing left to shred :D

Edited by dustbinlidsid

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Over here in NI, where we've had half a crash builders are down on their uppers.

I've several mates in the building trade who haven't done very much building in two years and a few who have done none at all and are now doing other jobs like couriering and cleaning.

The ones that are still building are bracing themselves for the cuts as a lot of govt jobs which they would have got a turn out of have been axed or are in the cross hairs for the chop.

On the bright side it's a good time to get any jobs done at a reasonable rate. ;)

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Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

Haha, I had exactly the same thought.

Remember this when you hear of them wailing about cuts, there's massive cuts to be made in the public sector, they are wildly out of touch with reality

I saw on a forum not to far from here someone saying his missus works in the public sector and the first person to go was the tea lady

The tea lady!

Who the hell in the private sector these days can justify having someone making tea for everyone and wheeling it around the office FFS??

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Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

Secure data disposal dontchaknow. Requirement under the Data Protection Act I'm sure. The (private) company I used to work for got rid of them as a cost-cutting measure so staff then just binned em. Tbh councils should have manual shredders. And get feral youths to operate them rather than taking them out on community service - i.e. spending two hours to paint a single bit of railing.

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Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

*sigh*

Private companies offer secure shredding services to local councils.

People like the benefits department of your local council receive hundreds of bits of confidential paperwork every day. If this were just put in a normal bin it could be retrieved and used for fraud.

Instead of employing somebody to ensure that this paperwork is destroyed after it has been used they put it into a secure bin which is then picked up by the contractor and then shredded in an industrial machine.

It is clearly more efficient to subcontract this out rather than buying an industrial scanner and employing someone to do this. Lots of private companies use these services to as they are also bound by data protection rules.

Clearly the truth is less interesting than a Littlejohn esque "what next a muslim lesbian only swimming pool" rant.

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Guest Noodle

Bikini-clad lesbian shredders?

I'd pay extra Council Tax to see that.

:blink:

betty-pariso-female-bodybuilder.jpg

Edited by Noodle

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Guest Noodle

Noodle, I now see why you live in Thailand :D:D

Dangerous level of tan that.

Factor 50 out here in the sun.

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*sigh*

Private companies offer secure shredding services to local councils.

People like the benefits department of your local council receive hundreds of bits of confidential paperwork every day. If this were just put in a normal bin it could be retrieved and used for fraud.

Instead of employing somebody to ensure that this paperwork is destroyed after it has been used they put it into a secure bin which is then picked up by the contractor and then shredded in an industrial machine.

It is clearly more efficient to subcontract this out rather than buying an industrial scanner and employing someone to do this. Lots of private companies use these services to as they are also bound by data protection rules.

Clearly the truth is less interesting than a Littlejohn esque "what next a muslim lesbian only swimming pool" rant.

Galvanised bin and a match?

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*sigh*

Private companies offer secure shredding services to local councils.

People like the benefits department of your local council receive hundreds of bits of confidential paperwork every day. If this were just put in a normal bin it could be retrieved and used for fraud.

Instead of employing somebody to ensure that this paperwork is destroyed after it has been used they put it into a secure bin which is then picked up by the contractor and then shredded in an industrial machine.

It is clearly more efficient to subcontract this out rather than buying an industrial scanner and employing someone to do this. Lots of private companies use these services to as they are also bound by data protection rules.

Clearly the truth is less interesting than a Littlejohn esque "what next a muslim lesbian only swimming pool" rant.

*sigh*

If they can be relied upon to put it in a secure disposal bin, why can't they be relied upon to be in it an internal shredding machine? We have them at our place, the owners wouldn't dream of paying someone to come in and do such a menial task that employees can bloody well do themselves

Public sector is completely out of touch

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Wait a minute? Did I read this right? The local authority employs someone just to shred paper?!!!! I am sooo happy to see my council tax is being spent so "efficiently!"

and he can either borrow 85K or has it as reserve.

Shredding is a highly skilled task.

you need to be qualified in lifting boxes....then they need to be labelled for destruction, so you have to be able to read.

then you need a safety certificate in handling cutting equipment to open the seals on the boxes.

then theres the 3 month course on how to use the shredder safely.

then you have to fill in a "DESTROYED" RECORD FORM..required keyboard and writing skills.

then you have bags of shredded cuttings to recycle out the back for the Gypsies to rummage through.

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Guest absolutezero

*sigh*

If they can be relied upon to put it in a secure disposal bin, why can't they be relied upon to be in it an internal shredding machine? We have them at our place, the owners wouldn't dream of paying someone to come in and do such a menial task that employees can bloody well do themselves

Public sector is completely out of touch

As is the "private" sector company that provides this service and the private sector companies that buy in to this service.

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As is the "private" sector company that provides this service and the private sector companies that buy in to this service.

Its a non job, privatised.

Like my local hospital using City Link for internal mail....I saw the manifests with my own eyes.

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If they can be relied upon to put it in a secure disposal bin, why can't they be relied upon to be in it an internal shredding machine?

My guess would be that there are requirements beyond just shredding for disposal of personal info on benefits & stuff by local councils; it's probably necessary to have a completely separate and audited disposal route.

I don't know that for sure, of course, but there seems little shortage of leaping to conclusions going on on this thread ;)

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Guest absolutezero

Its a non job, privatised.

Like my local hospital using City Link for internal mail....I saw the manifests with my own eyes.

It is crazy!

The foaming at the mouth freaks on here should be careful what they wish for.

"Cut the public sector non-jobs" they scream.

The first ones to go will be the private sector jobs like the ones highlighted on this thread.

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  • 149 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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