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Seeking A Little Car Advice Too...

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Right chaps - without wishing to reinforce all those male\female stereotypes, I could do with a little car advice since, whilst I can strip a computer down no probs, I'm a bit blonde with cars. :rolleyes:

My local petrol station had two air thingys for me to inflate tyres. Trouble is they give different readings. One is the old 'squirty' kind with a pressure gauge on the widget where you squirt the air in, and the other is a digital one where you push buttons and it bleeps when you've squirted enough in \ let enough out to hit the right pressure.

Air thingy A (the squirty one) gives me a reading about 10lbs > Air thingy B (the digi one). If only one machine was there I'd probably never know, except that I filled my tyres with Thingy A, then checked them with Thingy B only to have to let out a lot of air for fear they might go 'POP'. Now they look a bit squashy though.

My next nearest garage is 10 miles away and, I hear, you have to put air into cold tyres. Does it matter if they are 10lb off? If so, what do I do?

Thanks in advance for your advice.

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Guest Noodle

Right chaps - without wishing to reinforce all those male\female stereotypes, I could do with a little car advice since, whilst I can strip a computer down no probs, I'm a bit blonde with cars. :rolleyes:

My local petrol station had two air thingys for me to inflate tyres. Trouble is they give different readings. One is the old 'squirty' kind with a pressure gauge on the widget where you squirt the air in, and the other is a digital one where you push buttons and it bleeps when you've squirted enough in \ let enough out to hit the right pressure.

Air thingy A (the squirty one) gives me a reading about 10lbs > Air thingy B (the digi one). If only one machine was there I'd probably never know, except that I filled my tyres with Thingy A, then checked them with Thingy B only to have to let out a lot of air for fear they might go 'POP'. Now they look a bit squashy though.

My next nearest garage is 10 miles away and, I hear, you have to put air into cold tyres. Does it matter if they are 10lb off? If so, what do I do?

Thanks in advance for your advice.

Just pump up until solid.

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Now they look a bit squashy though.

My next nearest garage is 10 miles away and, I hear, you have to put air into cold tyres. Does it matter if they are 10lb off? If so, what do I do?

Thanks in advance for your advice.

If they do look 'squashy', they are probably too low. 10 lbs is a hell of a difference. Don't worry too much about the cold tyres thing. Unless it's a F1 car or a drag racer, temp will make little difference, perhaps 2 lbs psi. If you have been out in the car for a while, knock 2 lbs psi off what you need to put in. You need another check if the 2 machines are that far different.

Be aware that some machines now have a bar reading. I watched a chap put 3.2 bar into his tyres thinking it was 32psi. It was about 46 psi. bouncy bouncy.

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If they do look 'squashy', they are probably too low. 10 lbs is a hell of a difference. Don't worry too much about the cold tyres thing. Unless it's a F1 car or a drag racer, temp will make little difference, perhaps 2 lbs psi. If you have been out in the car for a while, knock 2 lbs psi off what you need to put in. You need another check if the 2 machines are that far different.

Be aware that some machines now have a bar reading. I watched a chap put 3.2 bar into his tyres thinking it was 32psi. It was about 46 psi. bouncy bouncy.

Run them a bit firm.Theyt might wear more quickly in the middle but it's usually the edges that scrub off first anyway.A couple of pounds high will most likely drop fuel consumption by 2-3% to offset any extra wear.

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Why not buy a pressure gauge or a foot pump with a gauge for about 6 quid. Keeping one in the car has got me home if a tyre

is leaking slowly.

What he said; I always carry a foot pump. Pound shops usually have pressure gauges.

And when most tyres need to go to about 30lb then 10lb is a helluva lot.

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Run them a bit firm.Theyt might wear more quickly in the middle but it's usually the edges that scrub off first anyway.A couple of pounds high will most likely drop fuel consumption by 2-3% to offset any extra wear.

I do that too, and I think there's a fairly big tolerance as well.

My car is advised by the Vauxhall handbook to have rear tyre pressures at 30 psi with up to 3 people in it and then 49 psi with a full load. Ridiculous. I set them to 32 unless it's going to be heavily loaded.

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Do not trust air pump A. I've had a similar experience. They are way off.

Use the digital pump, and if necessary buy a gauge. The gauge is cheap and simple to use. My employer is fanatical about correct tyre pressures, so for me it's a must.

Correct tyre pressures for the current weather conditions increase road grip and lower fuel use. Flabby tyres are going to hit you in running costs.

I'm not sure if police road stops can penalise you for incorrect pressures. Obviously they can for worn tyres.

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Why not buy a pressure gauge or a foot pump with a gauge for about 6 quid. Keeping one in the car has got me home if a tyre

is leaking slowly.

If you don't fancy a foot pump, you can buy one of the electric ones that plug into the cigar lighter - much easier in this heat.;)

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If you don't fancy a foot pump, you can buy one of the electric ones that plug into the cigar lighter - much easier in this heat.;)

Lazy cow! Scrub your doorstep!

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What he said; I always carry a foot pump. Pound shops usually have pressure gauges.

And when most tyres need to go to about 30lb then 10lb is a helluva lot.

I always carry a breast pump...milky milky

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Lazy cow! Scrub your doorstep!

Guilty as charged. There are better things I could be doing with my time. And my son does the tyres on my car.:o

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Guilty as charged. There are better things I could be doing with my time. And my son does the tyres on my car.:o

Never iron anything. Only buy non-iron clothes. It's a disgusting waste of life.

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Never iron anything. Only buy non-iron clothes. It's a disgusting waste of life.

I'm probably ahead of you there. Haven't ironed at all since I left the Navy in 1973!:blink:

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I'm probably ahead of you there. Haven't ironed at all since I left the Navy in 1973!:blink:

That was 2 years before I was born so, yes.

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You guys are fab - thanks for all the useful advice and the absence of ridicule! So, in short I'm going to:

buy a lighter-pump

buy a pressure gauge

never have squashy tires again

save on fuel and have a nice bouncy car.

Thank you very much - I'll sort it in the morning! :)

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dont overinflate them

you may get better mpg but

you have a higher risk of a blowout

and your braking distances will increase

as will your likelyhood of skidding

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What he said; I always carry a foot pump. Pound shops usually have pressure gauges.

And when most tyres need to go to about 30lb then 10lb is a helluva lot.

That's dangerously soft. You really need to be putting 100-120psi in a lorry tyre - hard work with a foot pump.

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You guys are fab - thanks for all the useful advice and the absence of ridicule! So, in short I'm going to:

buy a lighter-pump

buy a pressure gauge

never have squashy tires again

save on fuel and have a nice bouncy car.

Thank you very much - I'll sort it in the morning! :)

A foot pump's a good idea to buy as well..with the cigar lighter pumps(if mine's similar to other types)the car engine needs to be running,and the pump is very noisy too!

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Buy a pressure gauge - £15 from Halfords for a good one.

Up to a point, too much pressure is better than too low.

Poke the tyre as hard as you can with a finger - it shouldn't distort, at all. If it does, add more air until you can get a proper pressure gauge.

Hot/cold tyres is ******** on road cars. Pressure is (roughly) linear with temperature in kelvin - so zero C = 273K, 30C is 303K, so a 10% difference at most, well within the limits of accuracy of most gauges.

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dont overinflate them

you may get better mpg but

you have a higher risk of a blowout

and your braking distances will increase

as will your likelyhood of skidding

does this pertain to the Breast Pump?

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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