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Willit

Secretly Poor

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00sy7yv

Jeremy Vine show today, have a listen from 1 hour 6 mins.

Some people have some strange priorities...

Mimicking as ordinary people to avoid being mobbed/lynched?

Strangely enough, I noticed that about half dozen of detached houses in immediate neighbourhood got new electric gates in the last year or so. Previously none of them had gates of any sort, just open drives.

They forgot to replace their lovely green hedges with high fences & barbed wire though :P

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Guest sillybear2

Hrm, I listened for a couple of minutes but had to stop lest I died of boredom, it seems their pensions are ok but they overstretched themselves by buying a huge house in some kind of vain 'keeping up appearances' crusade, but ultimately nobody cares about your shocking confession misses, you're just another self-obsessed middle-class whiner, you have your health, a roof over your head, you're not starving and you live in an advanced welfare state, i.e. better off than 90% of the people on this planet.

Do these people seriously think they're hard done by? What percentage of the population is this blinkered?

Edited by sillybear2

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Do these people seriously think they're hard done by? What percentage of the population is this blinkered?

A growing percentage though.

I guess the theme of 19th century novels was often that of families fallen on hard times, reduced to one or two servants for example. Maybe there should be coming out days for the new poor of the 21st century.

These people lack knowledge and skills...

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Hrm, I listened for a couple of minutes but had to stop lest I died of boredom, it seems their pensions are ok but they overstretched themselves by buying a huge house in some kind of vain 'keeping up appearances' crusade, but ultimately nobody cares about your shocking confession misses, you're just another self-obsessed middle-class whiner, you have your health, a roof over your head, you're not starving and you live in an advanced welfare state, i.e. better off than 90% of the people on this planet.

Do these people seriously think they're hard done by? What percentage of the population is this blinkered?

I think you're being a bit harsh there.

Thought she was brave to be so honest.

Everybody measures there wealth by the people around them, not against Kenyan subsistence farmers.

Not being able to socialise because of lack of money is not easy. We're social animals.

The travel girl was brilliant. Articulated very concisely the pressure put on people to buy and not rent.

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Guest sillybear2

1 billion people still live in shanty towns without proper sanitation, whilst that lady could practically solve all of her "problems" by moving to a slightly smaller home, but maybe I just have an odd definition of 'poor'?

So being 'poor' in the UK is no longer about material wants but is defined by what other people think of you? The thing is most people don't care, they're too busy living their lives to make abstract judgements about other peoples' bank statements, and if some people really are that shallow it merely reveals a deep insecurity in them, which isn't your problem anyway.

Not being able to socialise because of lack of money is not easy. We're social animals.

That's not the problem either, she could easily afford the odd drink and a nice frock, the only problem is her peers will be talking about their third holiday this year in Fiji :lol:

Edited by sillybear2

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Didn't hear the prog but I would guess that you were hearing the tip of the iceberg.

Most folk would never tell anyone that they were hard up (or thought they were).

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Guest sillybear2

Didn't hear the prog but I would guess that you were hearing the tip of the iceberg.

Most folk would never tell anyone that they were hard up (or thought they were).

Not having what you want = poor.

Apparently.

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1 billion people still live in shanty towns without proper sanitation, whilst that lady could practically solve all of her "problems" by moving to a slightly smaller home, but maybe I just have an odd definition of 'poor'?

So being 'poor' in the UK is no longer about material wants but is defined by what other people think of you? The thing is most people don't care, they're too busy living their lives to make abstract judgements about other peoples' bank statements, and if some people really are that shallow it merely reveals a deep insecurity in them, which isn't your problem anyway.

That's not the problem either, she could easily afford the odd drink and a nice frock, the only problem is her peers will be talking about their third holiday this year in Fiji :lol:

So we should all compare ourselves with people in shanty towns with no sanitation?

She never said she had a big house - just a lovely house. Downsizing might not be an option.

Nothing wrong with wanting to live in a nice house is there?

Nobody in the UK is going to live in a house with no sanitation or starve. Thankfully we left that behind years ago. So by your definition nobody in the UK can be called poor.

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Guest sillybear2

So we should all compare ourselves with people in shanty towns with no sanitation?

She never said she had a big house - just a lovely house. Downsizing might not be an option.

Nothing wrong with wanting to live in a nice house is there?

Nobody in the UK is going to live in a house with no sanitation or starve. Thankfully we left that behind years ago. So by your definition nobody in the UK can be called poor.

Maybe we should in order to gain a sense of perspective. You're right, nobody in the UK is truly poor, nobody starves and there's access to comprehensive healthcare, so instead we chose to define wealth in trinkets.

There's nothing wrong with having a nice house or getting on in life, nothing at all, but buying something you can't afford at the wrong time in life then whinging about your circumstances doesn't particularly evoke much sympathy in me, maybe I'll reserve that for soldiers that have lost limbs or left children and widows behind.

The lady spoke about having a good life and not previously wanting for anything, this has skewed her expectations and now defines her baseline, she may feel she's entitled to a better than average house but in reality she's no more entitled to it than anyone else who can't really afford it, regardless if they speak a second language.

Edited by sillybear2

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Maybe we should in order to gain a sense of perspective. You're right, nobody in the UK is truly poor, nobody starves and there's access to comprehensive healthcare, so instead we chose to define wealth in trinkets.

But she wasn't defining her wealth in trinkets, was she?

Her main gripe was the inability to socialise.

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Guest sillybear2

But she wasn't defining her wealth in trinkets, was she?

Her main gripe was the inability to socialise.

Yes, because she traded all that for the biggest trinket of all; an unaffordable house.

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I didn't have a lot of sympathy.

All their money was going on either running an expensive house or an expensive car.

The answer is obvious - trade down - and that they're not doing this because they want to present a false impression of affluence is entirely down to them.

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Maybe we should in order to gain a sense of perspective. You're right, nobody in the UK is truly poor, nobody starves and there's access to comprehensive healthcare, so instead we chose to define wealth in trinkets.

There's nothing wrong with having a nice house or getting on in life, nothing at all, but buying something you can't afford at the wrong time in life then whinging about your circumstances doesn't particularly evoke much sympathy in me, maybe I'll reserve that for soldiers that have lost limbs or left children and widows behind.

The lady spoke about having a good life and not previously wanting for anything, this has skewed her expectations and now defines her baseline, she may feel she's entitled to a better than average house but in reality she's no more entitled to it than anyone else who can't really afford it, regardless if they speak a second language.

+1

Totally agree SB2

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A growing percentage though.

I guess the theme of 19th century novels was often that of families fallen on hard times, reduced to one or two servants for example. Maybe there should be coming out days for the new poor of the 21st century.

These people lack knowledge and skills...

Even country vicars had

horseman/driver

stable lad

maid or two

gardener

cook

They were "lords of their manner!"

I can remember life-long maid servants/gardeners still around in the 60's!

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Yes, because she traded all that for the biggest trinket of all; an unaffordable house.

When I was young I stayed with mum and dad and spent all my earnings on socialising and very big fast cars :D

Didn't buy a flat like some friends as that was not my priority then.

When I got married and had kids I bought a house due to different needs.

Trouble is, a lot of other folk didn't swap one life for another and tried to have it all. Mostly on credit.

Although I don't like all these threads saying we should all go back to living like paupers I do accept that there are going to be a lot of folk who hit harder times that I will struggle to sympathise with.

Edited by Nickolarge

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Didn't hear the prog but I would guess that you were hearing the tip of the iceberg.

Most folk would never tell anyone that they were hard up (or thought they were).

You didn't miss much. It's about people who think they are poor but they are at T minus 10 years poor. They have know idea what's coming to them and what poor means and so talk nonsense.

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So we should all compare ourselves with people in shanty towns with no sanitation?
Maybe we should in order to gain a sense of perspective.

Maybe we should prontissimo because we're competing for jobs with people in shanty towns.

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Maybe we should prontissimo because we're competing for jobs with people in shanty towns.

Wages earners at the economic centre have always have their wages curtailed by activity that takes place at the margins, it's a fundamental economic law known as the ricardian law of rent.

The typical knee-jerk reaction is to adopt protectionist policies and pretend that these people don't exist, this is problematic however as it drives up costs and lowers living standards in the new competition-free state.

Edited by Chef

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A growing percentage though.

I guess the theme of 19th century novels was often that of families fallen on hard times, reduced to one or two servants for example. Maybe there should be coming out days for the new poor of the 21st century.

These people lack knowledge and skills...

Really?

My thoughts turn to Dickens, and very much the opposite: families that live in severely reduced circumstances and struggle hard to make ends meet if they fall on hard times. Of course, being Dickens, if his protagonists fall into such distress they'll be rescued by a stroke of good fortune (like a chance meeting with the Cheeryble brothers), and only those born to it (like Joe the sweep) stay poor. And who else in the 19th century can compare to Dickens as social commentator and campaigner?

Maybe you could cite examples, but I suspect you're looking back to an earlier age. Or backward-looking novels of any age.

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<br />1 billion people still live in shanty towns without proper sanitation, whilst that lady could practically solve all of her "problems" by moving to a slightly smaller home, but maybe I just have an odd definition of 'poor'?<br /><br />So being 'poor' in the UK is no longer about material wants but is defined by what other people think of you? The thing is most people don't care, they're too busy living their lives to make abstract judgements about other peoples' bank statements, and if some people really are that shallow it merely reveals a deep insecurity in them, which isn't your problem anyway.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br />That's not the problem either, she could easily afford the odd drink and a nice frock, the only problem is her peers will be talking about their third holiday this year in Fiji <img src='http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':lol:' /><br />
<br /><br /><br />

They are left like that coz it suits our Western elites to have exploitive dictators in place, to sell lucrative arms to (internal genocides) and exploit the country's resources cheaply.

Fela Kuti (nigerian) "Sorrow, Tears & Blood" was making records from the 60's with songs about the rip-off elites of Nigeria, stuffing their off-shore bank accounts with stolen oil money, whilst the nigerian peasants were dying by bullet, starvation or disease.

They have been on tv recently showing false propaganda!

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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