Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Si1

Biggest Revolution In The Nhs For 60 Years - Telegraph - Gettign Rid Of Nhs Management Layers?

Recommended Posts

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7880592/Biggest-revolution-in-the-NHS-for-60-years.html

About £80billion will be distributed to family GPs in a move that will see strategic health authorities and primary care trusts scrapped.

The plan, contained in a white paper to be published next week, is designed to place key decisions about how patients are cared for in the hands of doctors who know them. Tens of thousands of administrative jobs in the health service will be lost as a result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice one.

Looks like the coalition means business.

No wonder so many piggies are squealing.

frankly gobsmacked

I don't want to comment too much before I have heard from the various medical professionals who post on here what their thoughts are

It could be ideological impractical nonsense and destined to fail. Or it could be a brave act of getting rid of centralised bread planning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The deficit is real. It is hard even for bears on here to comprehend the size of it, and that it must be dealt with.

The order of importance, now revealed by the turn of events:

1. Monetry system based on faith - the books must balance

2. Asset prices

3. Inflation

4. Jobs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tens of thousands of administrative jobs in the health service will be lost as a result.

The knock-on effects of emptying all those executive parking places has to be considered. Good god, ordinary working staff might start using them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The knock-on effects of emptying all those executive parking places has to be considered. Good god, ordinary working staff might start using them!

you have no heart...think of the poor machines, autogates, money machines and remote answer boxes being sent to the smelters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

frankly gobsmacked

I don't want to comment too much before I have heard from the various medical professionals who post on here what their thoughts are

It could be ideological impractical nonsense and destined to fail. Or it could be a brave act of getting rid of centralised bread planning.

Having worked in primary care, I'd say this is a good move. As far as I could understand each PCT needed a whole office block of admin staff in order to administrate the primary care providers in their area. These people were only needed because this is the way the system was set up. There must have been a HUGE amount of repetition with each PCT doing the same thing. Perhaps it would be more efficient to centralise this process.

Down side, of course, is a lot of jobs will be lost.

Edited by izzy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/7880592/Biggest-revolution-in-the-NHS-for-60-years.html

About £80billion will be distributed to family GPs in a move that will see strategic health authorities and primary care trusts scrapped.

I am not surprised that these primary care trusts are to be scrapped.

They must of been such a waste of nhs money.

I know of someone who works for them.

He does report writing HR/admin type stuff. He took voluntary redundancy and a nice big payoff from them several years ago. Then, like many, many others working in primary care trusts, went back to work for them, but as a freelance consultant, earning easily on average, £1000 per day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know of someone who works for them.

He does report writing HR/admin type stuff. He took voluntary redundancy and a nice big payoff from them several years ago. Then, like many, many others working in primary care trusts, went back to work for them, but as a freelance consultant, earning easily on average, £1000 per day.

did he invest it all in buy to let?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kenneth W. & Hattie J.:-

Matron

Yes Doctor?

What are all these suited twits with clipboards doing in a hospital?

Getting in the way Doctor.

Well, you know exactly what you can do with them now, don't you?

My pleasure Doctor.

........ Doctor, as this is the fourth floor, shall we show them the direct route by opening all the windows? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love this - it's so clever. They promised to ring fence NHS spending. So they are simply giving the money to GP's to spend instead of all the pen pushers and managers working for PCT's. Hence saving a fortune on over inflated salaries. It should save us all a fortune. Many GP practices will need to employ more ordinary average payed admin help to assist them so some of the jobs will be saved this way. However they won't be employing the fat cat managers and consultants and building them new office blocks and car parks!

Bring it on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sound of one hand clapping.

The other hand is held up in horror at the stories we're going to see emerging from GPs around the country, as they get pushed into taking on managerial and administrative responsibilities (and staff) they neither want nor are competent to deal with (except by coincidence).

OTOH it's not as if the existing GP system was anything to write home about, either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously having massive tiers of management in place is a bad thing, and obviously the spending decisions of the nhs need to be made by frontline staff who know the requirements.

However whilst "let the doctors decide" might sound good don't we want doctors to be, you know, doctors.

They get paid around £100k a year after 7 years specialist training to become experts in medicine, and then we want them to sit in meetings and coordinate spending.

I can't imagine any business saying "right we've got this real specialist in to do some coding, but as he is really good at that we'll ask him to order hardware too"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't imagine any business saying "right we've got this real specialist in to do some coding, but as he is really good at that we'll ask him to order hardware too"

Heh! Very droll.

If you're good at coding, you're obviously a junior bod in your first couple of years after graduating. By your later 20s you should be heading to a real job: management or marketing. Or else dropping out of the UK IT business's career structure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't imagine any business saying "right we've got this real specialist in to do some coding, but as he is really good at that we'll ask him to order hardware too"

err - that's what happens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh! Very droll.

If you're good at coding, you're obviously a junior bod in your first couple of years after graduating. By your later 20s you should be heading to a real job: management or marketing. Or else dropping out of the UK IT business's career structure.

If they are good at coding they end up doing it for ever

Your only hope of getting into management is if you're shit at coding....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously having massive tiers of management in place is a bad thing, and obviously the spending decisions of the nhs need to be made by frontline staff who know the requirements.

However whilst "let the doctors decide" might sound good don't we want doctors to be, you know, doctors.

They get paid around £100k a year after 7 years specialist training to become experts in medicine, and then we want them to sit in meetings and coordinate spending.

I can't imagine any business saying "right we've got this real specialist in to do some coding, but as he is really good at that we'll ask him to order hardware too"

Er, why not? You wouldn't want a junior doctor in that role but someone who has more experience of the job(s) a doctor does will be better placed to plan strategically. I'm not in the NHS or medicine, but things like how many X-ray machines to buy, how many wards to build, specialist treatment centres or something. It doesn't have to be a doctor, ,maybe a senior nurse?

Someone coming in from a management only track (or god forbid, an MBA), wouldn't have the knowledge to make decent decisions. I'd argue that that is exactly the type of management you don't want because all they understand is the bottom line - literally, as they don't understand any of the medical bits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite apart from everything else the opportunity for corruption is going to be epic. It seems to happen all the time at this level. A friend of a friend is a dentist and was recently very chuffed about his recent training course, paid for by an equipment supplier. Nothing unusual about suppliers offering training, but this course happened to be in Tignes in Feb, and the training bit lasted for 2 hours - the skiing bit lasted for 6 days and 6 hours. Of course, this is priced into the kit, so we're paying for it. Expect to see a lot more of this....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they are good at coding they end up doing it for ever

That's what I said. You drop out of the UK IT career structure, 'cos if you hit 30 and you're still in programming/analysis/design you're obviously a complete failure for not having progressed.

Happy to say there are alternatives. For example, I've been much better-treated working under US managers, both as contractor and permie. They seem to treat software development as a real job with value.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I said. You drop out of the UK IT career structure, 'cos if you hit 30 and you're still in programming/analysis/design you're obviously a complete failure for not having progressed.

Happy to say there are alternatives. For example, I've been much better-treated working under US managers, both as contractor and permie. They seem to treat software development as a real job with value.

alternative - by 30s you need to find a technical niche - generic oracle, MS coders need to go into management as their skills just have too low a barrier to entry from cheaper younger labour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other hand is held up in horror at the stories we're going to see emerging from GPs around the country, as they get pushed into taking on managerial and administrative responsibilities (and staff) they neither want nor are competent to deal with (except by coincidence).

Or, as now, they can just join a larger surgery and continue to be a practising medic with little or no management responsibility should they choose to :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.