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Bruce Banner

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Nobody calls a house a house anymore, or a flat a flat :rolleyes:.

The move to calling any dwelling a 'property' now seems complete. "A man was arrested at a property in London" is now the normal parlance for the TV News channels, although the use of 'house' or 'flat' would be more descriptive.

I don't own a house, or a flat, but the inventory of my property is quite extensive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property

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Nobody calls a house a house anymore, or a flat a flat :rolleyes:.

The move to calling any dwelling a 'property' now seems complete. "A man was arrested at a property in London" is now the normal parlance for the TV News channels, although the use of 'house' or 'flat' would be more descriptive.

I don't own a house, or a flat, but the inventory of my property is quite extensive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property

I reckon they use the word 'property' as a default now, simply to distinguish it from a camper van or caravan.

Whether it's a flat, apartment, maisonette, villa, house or estate, it's still a "property." :(

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Nobody calls a house a house anymore, or a flat a flat :rolleyes:.

The move to calling any dwelling a 'property' now seems complete. "A man was arrested at a property in London" is now the normal parlance for the TV News channels, although the use of 'house' or 'flat' would be more descriptive.

I don't own a house, or a flat, but the inventory of my property is quite extensive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property

It is also part of the propoganda. Everyone who owns a property is special. It doens't matter whether it is a broom cupboard or a mansion.

Adding on a surplufuous "area" to many rooms also gets my goat.

When and why did a "kitchen" become a "kitchen area" or a "dining room" a "dining area"? My guess is that it is part of the same propoganda to make everyone special. AS long as you own your own property, it doesn't matter whether you eats in a large room full of furniture or a small nook with barely enough room for a bistro set, you eat in the "dining area" in your property and are therefore special.

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Nobody calls a house a house anymore, or a flat a flat :rolleyes:.

The move to calling any dwelling a 'property' now seems complete. "A man was arrested at a property in London" is now the normal parlance for the TV News channels, although the use of 'house' or 'flat' would be more descriptive.

I don't own a house, or a flat, but the inventory of my property is quite extensive.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property

If you wanted a generic term for house, bungalow, flat, maisonette... etc., what word would you choose?

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Because it's a kitchen-diner, and therefore there is a kitchen area and a dining area, not separate rooms.

As to the use of property - you expect today's journalists to actually do some work and find out what sort of residence was raided or whatever? :D Using 'property' means that they don't have to.

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When and why did a "kitchen" become a "kitchen area" or a "dining room" a "dining area"? My guess is that it is part of the same propoganda to make everyone special. AS long as you own your own property, it doesn't matter whether you eats in a large room full of furniture or a small nook with barely enough room for a bistro set, you eat in the "dining area" in your property and are therefore special.

I don't know whether it's correct or not, but I've assumed that the use of 'area' rather than 'room' is to indicate that it's not a room, but a part of a room; as in a 'dining area' in the kitchen/dining room combo.

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I wouldn't, I'd be specific.

Surely, you can understand that sometimes it's useful to have a generic term (not just for houses etc., but for, well... everything)?

Don't you ever want to refer to a 'property' (sorry!) irrespective of what type it might be, or when you don't know what type it is?

Isn't it just useful in language to be able to generalise sometimes? :huh:

If I didn't know better, I'd assume you were just being difficult for the sake of it! :)

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I don't know whether it's correct or not, but I've assumed that the use of 'area' rather than 'room' is to indicate that it's not a room, but a part of a room; as in a 'dining area' in the kitchen/dining room combo.

You haven't spent enough time watching property porn ...... EAs seem to add "area" to just about every room, even the completely freestanding ones.

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You haven't spent enough time watching property porn ...... EAs seem to add "area" to just about every room, even the completely freestanding ones.

I'm one of the lucky ones[1] -- I've NEVER watched property porn! :D

[1] No pun on your forum name intended.

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I'm one of the lucky ones[1] -- I've NEVER watched property porn! :D

[1] No pun on your forum name intended.

Know your enemy.

Sun Tzu : The Art of War

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A studio apartment is worth more if described like this: it has a separate kitchen area, and a separate sleeping area.

Words are powerful tools. It separates the sophisticated seller and the unsophisticated buyer.

3347581229_09fabe3348.jpg

How else will an EA shift a small room with a sink and futon for over a hundred thousand?

Edited by Money Spinner

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Surely, you can understand that sometimes it's useful to have a generic term (not just for houses etc., but for, well... everything)?

Don't you ever want to refer to a 'property' (sorry!) irrespective of what type it might be, or when you don't know what type it is?

Isn't it just useful in language to be able to generalise sometimes? :huh:

If I didn't know better, I'd assume you were just being difficult for the sake of it! :)

My point is that they do it always.

Never do the TV journalists or newsreaders ever call a house, a house.

I think it's probably because they're all into BTL and 'property' is primarily an investment for them.

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My point is that they do it always.

Never do the TV journalists or newsreaders ever call a house, a house.

I think it's probably because they're all into BTL and 'property' is primarily an investment for them.

Yes, I can see what you mean.

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It is also part of the propoganda. Everyone who owns a property is special. It doens't matter whether it is a broom cupboard or a mansion.

Adding on a surplufuous "area" to many rooms also gets my goat.

When and why did a "kitchen" become a "kitchen area" or a "dining room" a "dining area"? My guess is that it is part of the same propoganda to make everyone special. AS long as you own your own property, it doesn't matter whether you eats in a large room full of furniture or a small nook with barely enough room for a bistro set, you eat in the "dining area" in your property and are therefore special.

this has been going on for a long time. I remember hanging out with some sloan chick back in the early 90's. Good looking broad, but dumb as a bag of rocks. She told me one day she had inherited 70k and was 'going to see some properties'. As even then it would only get you a small one bed or studio in London, I realised it was time to move on.

Last I heard, she blew the lot. But not on pwoperdy. She checked herself into some exclusive rehab clininc in Maida Vale where they 'treated' her for her 'depression' until the 70k was used up, at which point they declared her fit, and bumped her into the street.

ah... some things never change...

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Too right !

I propose we rename the forum propertypricecrash.co.uk

:D

It's a misguided attempt to up the register. The police are masters of this: 'vehicle' instead of 'car', 'male' instead of 'man'.

If you're a bit thick and want to make your speech sound more intelligent then these tricks are very tempting. Unfortunately, it just sounds ugly. The ultimate one for this is 'yourself' used - not as a reflexive pronoun - to decorate the speech of estate agents and recruitment consultants all over Britain

And WTF is with 'today'? Every cashier, waiter and cabin crew member append it to any question they ever ask.

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It is also part of the propoganda. Everyone who owns a property is special. It doens't matter whether it is a broom cupboard or a mansion.

Adding on a surplufuous "area" to many rooms also gets my goat.

When and why did a "kitchen" become a "kitchen area" or a "dining room" a "dining area"? My guess is that it is part of the same propoganda to make everyone special. AS long as you own your own property, it doesn't matter whether you eats in a large room full of furniture or a small nook with barely enough room for a bistro set, you eat in the "dining area" in your property and are therefore special.

I find the word "space" particularly irritating, in the context of "this is such a wonderful space", or "what a fantastic space" when they really just mean room...grrrrr

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I find the word "space" particularly irritating, in the context of "this is such a wonderful space", or "what a fantastic space" when they really just mean room...grrrrr

You are right.

"Space" conjures up visions of interior designers, Lutron lighting, elegant but uncomfortable furniture and some sticks in a vase etc that will turn the room into something so desirable that your friends and family will be filled with envy when they come round.

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I find the word "space" particularly irritating, in the context of "this is such a wonderful space", or "what a fantastic space" when they really just mean room...grrrrr

... "fastest growing....... **insert any term here**...." used by persons who think they are journalists rather than by persons who are..

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You are right.

"Space" conjures up visions of interior designers, Lutron lighting, elegant but uncomfortable furniture and some sticks in a vase etc that will turn the room into something so desirable that your friends and family will be filled with envy when they come round.

Hehe :lol:

We have been discussing the descriptions from this agent over on the Wales forum - worth a read if you want a laugh!!

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find/Fine/Monmouth.html?locationIdentifier=BRANCH%5E30186&includeSSTC=true&_includeSSTC=on

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... "fastest growing....... **insert any term here**...." used by persons who think they are journalists rather than by persons who are..

What about "reception" RECEPTION !! what the f**** is that, seriously - I don't know even to this day what it means

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What about "reception" RECEPTION !! what the f**** is that, seriously - I don't know even to this day what it means

It is the room where you receive your faithful subjects.

Of course, it might just be a "reception area" in a studio flat with a bean bag chair but why shatter the myth.

As soon as you own a house, you are part of the landed elite and have earned the right to use grand terms to describe rooms.

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Hehe :lol:

We have been discussing the descriptions from this agent over on the Wales forum - worth a read if you want a laugh!!

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find/Fine/Monmouth.html?locationIdentifier=BRANCH%5E30186&includeSSTC=true&_includeSSTC=on

Thanks for that. I needed a good laugh. It sounds like something that would have been written in a creative writing course by a 14 year old.

I suppose the strategy of describing a home as offering the best value for money on the market and giving examples of comparable properties at worse prices is doomed to fail.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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