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Bearfaced-Chic

Belgian Undertakers Plan To Dissolve Dead

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"The idea is for the deceased to be placed in a container with water and salts and then pressurised and after a little time, about two hours, mineral ash and liquid is left over," said a spokesman for the Flemish Association of Undertakers.

Dissolved dead

I can see a couple of obvious benefits to this.

1) Reduced danger of the dead coming back to life and eating humans.

2) Less land required for burial => more land for houses => cheaper houses,

What's not to like!

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"The idea is for the deceased to be placed in a container with water and salts and then pressurised and after a little time, about two hours, mineral ash and liquid is left over," said a spokesman for the Flemish Association of Undertakers.

Dissolved dead

I can see a couple of obvious benefits to this.

1) Reduced danger of the dead coming back to life and eating humans.

2) Less land required for burial => more land for houses => cheaper houses,

What's not to like!

3) More environmentally friendly than burning? :o

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

"The idea is for the deceased to be placed in a container with water and salts and then pressurised and after a little time, about two hours, mineral ash and liquid is left over," said a spokesman for the Flemish Association of Undertakers.

Dissolved dead

I can see a couple of obvious benefits to this.

1) Reduced danger of the dead coming back to life and eating humans.

2) Less land required for burial => more land for houses => cheaper houses,

What's not to like!

I wonder if they are going to tackle the existing graveyards and get even MORE land available?huh.gif Mind you it would throw a spanner in the works for them wot do family research. Traipsing around graveyards is all part of the

fun.

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I wonder if they are going to tackle the existing graveyards and get even MORE land available?huh.gif  Mind you it would throw a spanner in the works for them wot do family research. Traipsing around graveyards is all part of the

fun.

Well there was a case in Leeds recently where a graveyard/church was going to be redeveloped into a hotel and relatives were contesting it. The church then conveniently burnt down B)

Most of the traipsing can be done online these days, even parish/graveyard records have been scanned.

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Guest Absolutely Fabulous

Well there was a case in Leeds recently where a graveyard/church was going to be redeveloped into a hotel and relatives were contesting it. The church then conveniently burnt down cool.gif

Most of the traipsing can be done online these days, even parish/graveyard records have been scanned.

True, but one gets the atmosphere of the ancestor's life better when you visit the village graveyard where their bones were laid to rest. I visited a little graveyard in Derbyshire - in Chelmorton - lovely quaint, 'untouched' since the days they lived there, almost.

My link

I'd hate to think Barratts, Wimpys or somesuch were going to steam roller over places like these and put ghastly little box-like dwellings there.sad.gif

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"The idea is for the deceased to be placed in a container with water and salts and then pressurised and after a little time, about two hours, mineral ash and liquid is left over," said a spokesman for the Flemish Association of Undertakers.

Dissolved dead

I can see a couple of obvious benefits to this.

1) Reduced danger of the dead coming back to life and eating humans.

2) Less land required for burial => more land for houses => cheaper houses,

What's not to like!

Why not use them as fertiliser?

Extremely wasteful in my view, and could cause problems in the water system.

If I own a garden and it's legalised when I die, I want to be buried in a vertical position and a fruit tree planted over me.

Edit :

It might not be good for the chemicals concerned to be widely available, I can see a lot of unsolved disappearance cases coming along soon after.....

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Most of the traipsing can be done online these days, even parish/graveyard records have been scanned.

... but not nearly enough yet, and The Online Parish Clerk stuff ( to abuse one source at random) is highly selective in transcriptions, with wildly varying standards. Nearly as wacky as the Census stuff (I think they got lifers, or Desis or something to do it one time. Blimey, what a guddle).

Alas, there's no substitute for the simple joys of evading ( rather than draw the inevitable shrieks of "******off, ya paedo!' and a shower of bottles ) careering gangs of cidered-up teenage goths of a summer evening, out in the mouldy scrubland round the steel-shuttered tabernacle, and pondering whether it's worth the trouble of scraping the turds off the putative ancestral slab to decipher it, now they've all been laid recumbent by a lawsuit-haunted landlord.

I suspect it's the girl-goths that are mostly to blame.

Poop on a tombstone, don't get your **** stung by nettles, see?

Whereas boy-goths are quite shy about doing things in public, I find ...

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Does it work with any old salts? I'm going to by a hamster and test it out?

I think you will just end up with a pickled hamster, which could be a delicacy, give it a go, please post pics.

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I think you will just end up with a pickled hamster, which could be a delicacy, give it a go, please post pics.

If so, you might want to add some pepper with that salt.

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... but not nearly enough yet, and The Online Parish Clerk stuff ( to abuse one source at random) is highly selective in transcriptions, with wildly varying standards. Nearly as wacky as the Census stuff (I think they got lifers, or Desis or something to do it one time. Blimey, what a guddle).

Alas, there's no substitute for the simple joys of evading ( rather than draw the inevitable shrieks of "******off, ya paedo!' and a shower of bottles ) careering gangs of cidered-up teenage goths of a summer evening, out in the mouldy scrubland round the steel-shuttered tabernacle, and pondering whether it's worth the trouble of scraping the turds off the putative ancestral slab to decipher it, now they've all been laid recumbent by a lawsuit-haunted landlord.

I suspect it's the girl-goths that are mostly to blame.

Poop on a tombstone, don't get your **** stung by nettles, see?

Whereas boy-goths are quite shy about doing things in public, I find ...

I love your posts Wario

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"The idea is for the deceased to be placed in a container with water and salts and then pressurised and after a little time, about two hours, mineral ash and liquid is left over," said a spokesman for the Flemish Association of Undertakers.

Dissolved dead

I can see a couple of obvious benefits to this.

1) Reduced danger of the dead coming back to life and eating humans.

2) Less land required for burial => more land for houses => cheaper houses,

What's not to like!

Brings a whole new meaning to the term 'Dissolving Parliament'! :D

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Does it work with any old salts? I'm going to buy a hamster and test it out?

Amstel are already selling the stuff...its a heineken brand I gather. Amstel is Belgian for 'amster

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What's not to like!

In Hong Kong you are buried for a few years, then you get dug up and your corpse and bones are stuffed into a vase no bigger than an old style CRT monitor screen. My dad's village in HK has such jars everywhere. My grandad is in a jar ontop of my dad's house. I'm always curious about opening it up to have a look to see how putrified it is because of the heat, but they are airtight.

Kiddies are nasty things though and use airpistols to crack them from a distance.

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Isn't it illegal to be buried in own garden and the like? Particularly without being in some sort of container?

I remember reading about Muslims trying to follow their customs in being buried wrapped in a simple cloth until the environmental health at the local council threw a fit.

Apparently the body releases all sorts of nasties into the earth which take some time to break down and of course they worry about contaminating the water supply.

As for local graveyards if your abode is within a couple hundred metres of an ancient church then there is a fair chance it is already sited on an ancient graveyard. In medieval times there was no such thing as cremation and not everyone could afford to be buried within the local churchyard, as such they used up common land as close to the church as they could get. I know of a situation close to me where an old Victorian house burnt down and was demolished. The LA decided to remove the structure and lay it down to car park, they found evidence of ancient burials in doing so and this is sited some 400 metres from the local parish church.

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[/b]True, but one gets the atmosphere of the ancestor's life better when you visit the village graveyard where their bones were laid to rest. I visited a little graveyard in Derbyshire - in Chelmorton - lovely quaint, 'untouched' since the days they lived there, almost.

My link

I'd hate to think Barratts, Wimpys or somesuch were going to steam roller over places like these and put ghastly little box-like dwellings there.sad.gif

Bloody hell, so someone did leave Chelly, instead of staying put and interbreeding. Ruddy place is full of people with the surname Lambert. Don't worry I think it's safe from housebuilders out there AJ.

One line on my Dad's side has turned up 'on my patch'. I'll have a list of surnames the kids aren't allowed to breed with, well before they get to that stage :lol:

Wario, brilliant. Only the other week I was investigating our local churchyard for relative's graves. I got lucky, one of them was in good nick (but still hadn't made it on to the transcription :angry: ), and in the bit of the graveyard that is well look after. As for the other one... I'm going back in full PPE next time :blink:

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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