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Snugglybear

Still Exporting Jobs

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I said it wouldn't stop

It will get worse as a result of the BOE/Govt meddling with the economy, keeping their precious bubble going - planning gains when selling up help shift production and the cost base. Will soon be at the point when the sklls/infrastructure are so denuded there will be no choice but leave. Oh, and carbon tax crapola.

Retards.

Edited by OnlyMe

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Unite is also calling for government support for manufacturing, and has spoken to First Minister Carwyn Jones and Neath MP Peter Hain, asking for their intervention to keep the site open.

Take tax off business.

Piss a large proportion of it up against the wall.

Give the remainder back in the form of development grants.

Truly, the UK is now run by retards.

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Take tax off business.

Piss a large proportion of it up against the wall.

Give the remainder back in the form of development grants.

Truly, the UK is now run by retards.

If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it. Ronald Reagan .

Unfortunately, everyone since seems to have interpreted that as a good thing rather than a bad one.

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200 jobs going from Swansea to "sites overseas"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west_wales/10536327.stm

And probably 70 from Deeside to India

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west_wales/10536327.stm

And the growth in jobs is going to be in the private sector, is it?

Yeah who said we dont export anything anymore?

This time next year we will be millionaires.

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Which comes just a couple of days after the Welsh Assembly state that they will no longer give grants to foreign firms to lure them to Wales or to keep them... let's see that tested now.

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Both link to the same article btw, but

"It was formerly owned by Ford and Visteon before being acquired by US-based Linamar Corporation in 2009.

The plant makes components for the automotive industry"

Those jobs went years ago, they've only just got round to announcing it.

Anyone working there that didn’t see this coming is a bit slow.

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http://www.burtonmail.co.uk/News/Toyota-to-axe-750-more-jobs-in-devastating-blow.htm

Toyota to axe 750 more jobs in ‘devastating blow’

by ROB SMYTH

‘A DEVASTATING blow to local people and the local economy’ was the way one worker described Toyota’s decision to axe 750 jobs from its Burnaston Plant.

ToyotaThe car giant confirmed that it is making 850 cuts in total — including 100 at its Deeside plant near Chester — all of which are expected to be voluntary

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http://www.burtonmail.co.uk/News/Toyota-to-axe-750-more-jobs-in-devastating-blow.htm

Toyota to axe 750 more jobs in ‘devastating blow’

by ROB SMYTH

‘A DEVASTATING blow to local people and the local economy’ was the way one worker described Toyota’s decision to axe 750 jobs from its Burnaston Plant.

ToyotaThe car giant confirmed that it is making 850 cuts in total — including 100 at its Deeside plant near Chester — all of which are expected to be voluntary

Is the same Toyota plant that only got a grant from the Welsh Assembly last week to make new engines... and which has got loads of grants from the same body in recent years?

Bit like the closing factory in Swansea which also received various grants in one way or the other?

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The reason WAG has put a stop to grants (announcement just made, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/10476100.stm) is that it's finally realised there's no point trying to bribe firms to come to or stay in Wales. They're going to bugger off sooner or later anyway, so why waste the money.

It's taken long enough for the penny to drop.

Only taken them 30 odd years.

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Was in Central America recently, staying in a town with a big car parts factory, think it was Toyota. Our guide said he had heard that the employees were limited as to how much they were allowed to drink in order to minimise toilet breaks and regularly searched. They must be paying them a tiny fraction of what they pay here, and they can pretty much treat them how they want because there are many people trying to get jobs there.

The government had offered them 3 years with no tax to pay to encourage them to set up there, and when the 3 years was up they just said if they were made to pay tax they would leave, so the government gave in.

All just what our guide told us, but if even some of it is true, and companies can get labour on these terms then why would they bother having big operations here?

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Was in Central America recently, staying in a town with a big car parts factory, think it was Toyota. Our guide said he had heard that the employees were limited as to how much they were allowed to drink in order to minimise toilet breaks and regularly searched. They must be paying them a tiny fraction of what they pay here, and they can pretty much treat them how they want because there are many people trying to get jobs there.

The government had offered them 3 years with no tax to pay to encourage them to set up there, and when the 3 years was up they just said if they were made to pay tax they would leave, so the government gave in.

All just what our guide told us, but if even some of it is true, and companies can get labour on these terms then why would they bother having big operations here?

Of course, sooner or later, no fecker will be able to afford their cars and they will have to sell them for whatever people in the Central American factory can afford to pay. After all, everyone in the West will be out of work.

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Of course, sooner or later, no fecker will be able to afford their cars and they will have to sell them for whatever people in the Central American factory can afford to pay. After all, everyone in the West will be out of work.

Of course, they won't need anyone to buy their cars because, er, because, um, no I give up.

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Is the same Toyota plant that only got a grant from the Welsh Assembly last week to make new engines... and which has got loads of grants from the same body in recent years?

Bit like the closing factory in Swansea which also received various grants in one way or the other?

No, it's the one in Burnaston, on the A50 near Derby. I guess the world-wide Toyota recall has hit demand somewhat...

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The answer is obvious.

More money to the Regional Development Agencies.

These are Magic Wealth Creating Machines.

According to their website.

Every £1 spent by RDAs achieves a return of at least £4.50 for regional economies. This increases to £6.40 when long term economic benefits are considered.

If we gave them all out money we'd be the richest country in the world.

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On Monday the Welsh Assembly made a big annoucement at the Toyota factory that no more firms would be bailed out with big grants... and by tonight, Wednesday, they are now thinking of going back on it to bail out the factory in Swansea according to BBC Wales.

They mentioned the Amazon depot as being the only manufacturing left in Swansea now. Doh!

I knew some guys who became very rich indeed working at that factory when it was Ford - and bought big houses across Swansea... but that was a long time ago in a Wales of real jobs. :rolleyes:

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So all that stuff about workers accepting pay cuts to save jobs was a load of ****** then?

More often than not that is the case , it very rarley makes a scrape of difference.

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Basically, the Assembly announced on Monday that grants are no more but firms can now apply for loans instead... and rumours are circulating that the annoucements today could well be the start of the exodus from Wales of what little private sector business Wales has.

This could become a flood throwing Wales into, yet another, crisis.

The Assembly appears to be bending over backwards not to fire any public sector workers, not to make any cuts... but by changing the grants to loans - incidently many businesses from within Wales have always found it difficult to obtain these grants - it could see Wales become even more dependent on public sector jobs in a short period of time... which is just a melt-down scenario.

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Emigration part of Irish life again

Last Updated Jul 2010

By: TCM Editorial

THE ILLS affecting the economy in Ireland show no sign of alleviating.

Since this time last year the Republic is €30billion further in debt, 60,000 more people are out of work, and roughly the same number have left Ireland to find work elsewhere.

With unemployment continuing to rise, the numbers leaving the country will inevitably grow, with Britain being one of the main destinations.

The demography of the Irish in Britain community will consequently change.

However, if experiences of the past are anything to go by, our community will benefit from this influx, our ties with Ireland re-invigorated.

But immigration also brings its own problems — many who arrive are not fully prepared for the challenges of life in Britain.

The English novelist and art critic John Berger once said: “Emigration, forced or chosen, across national frontiers or from village to metropolis, is the quintessential experience of our time.”

It certainly seems to be a defining feature of Irish life, and one that the community here in Britain know all about. But we must be ready, willing and able to play our part in giving a helping hand to those who need it.

If the economic situation in Ireland continues to deteriorate, the new influx of immigrants will be a challenge to all Irish organisations, including ourselves here at The Irish Post.

Welfare bodies in particular will have challenges ahead in making themselves relevant and supportive to new emigrants, and indeed the Irish Government should be lobbied to ring-fence grant money — from the cuts they’ve made back home — to aid this endeavour.

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It feels like we need to tax outsourcing (easier said than done).

Its actually quite straight forward, you simply do not allow payments made for "consultancy or business services" made to non UK companies to be deductible for tax , doing the same for "royalties" and payments for intellectual property rights closes down the rest of the loopholes for offshoring profits.

If the government really wanted to level the playing field for employing someone to be sat at a desk in mumbai or manchester it would be fairly straightforward, the only thing to complicate matters might be the EU but there is also a fairly easy way round that one too ...

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200 jobs going from Swansea to "sites overseas"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west_wales/10536327.stm

And probably 70 from Deeside to India

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/south_west_wales/10536327.stm

And the growth in jobs is going to be in the private sector, is it?

there won't be private growth in the UK for decades. Our manufacturing is too low value and low tech but at the same time costs are as high here as they are in Germany. Most factories are still being knocked down to build more profitable housing development. The price of land Is a major factor.

Labour costs in the UK are some of the lowest in Europe, so we can't blame the workers.

Edited by dubsie

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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