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Just Bought A Piano

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The wife's been wanting one for years, and, tbh, I've always fancied one myself.

So, bought an acoustic -- I wanted to go digital initially but she was insistent -- so we've got a refurbed Broadwood upright; I'd heard horror stories about the cheap pianos, not that this was expensive mind.

I play the guitar, although not to any great standard - I taught myself and in hindsight should have had lessons.

Any advice on how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Lessons? I see quite a few study programmes on t'internet', any good?

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Guest theboltonfury

The wife's been wanting one for years, and, tbh, I've always fancied one myself.

So, bought an acoustic -- I wanted to go digital initially but she was insistent -- so we've got a refurbed Broadwood upright; I'd heard horror stories about the cheap pianos, not that this was expensive mind.

I play the guitar, although not to any great standard - I taught myself and in hindsight should have had lessons.

Any advice on how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Lessons? I see quite a few study programmes on t'internet', any good?

I would have thought you'll need at some point to learn to read music.

Piano is a bit more complicated as it has two clefs.

I don't play piano, but I would have seriously thought that a set of lessons with a good teacher would be the best start.

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I would have thought you'll need at some point to learn to read music.

Piano is a bit more complicated as it has two clefs.

I don't play piano, but I would have seriously thought that a set of lessons with a good teacher would be the best start.

I think you're right, I've just had to Google "Clef"!

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I bought one nearly a year ago and have been trying to teach myself from the internet and books. Progress has been very slow but then again so has my ability to sit down and concentrate on it - I go in spurts of practicing a lot then not touching it for weeks. If you've got a lot more willpower and dedication than me then you may well get somewhere quickly like that. I'm guessing that the biggest advantage of lessons would be the forced discipline, both for keeping going often once the initial enthusiasm has waned a bit and for sticking to the dull-but-necessary stuff.

Having had recorder lessons forced on me in primary school possibly helps a little; at least I can vaguely read the treble clef (i.e. I don't have to pause and think what every single note on it is).

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Guest theboltonfury

I think you're right, I've just had to Google "Clef"!

Ok. Make the call. Don't delay.

You're about a 1000% more likely to improve as you have your own piano.

Ask about block bookings, you'll get a discount. Expect to pay £20-25 an hour for lessons. Remember too - a great player doesn't always make a good teacher, so find out a bit about the teacher before you sign up. Ask if they have a syllabus that you can see. What set pieces do they teach? etc etc

Oh, and order from amazon the AB guide to reading music. Do it now! Good luck.

I'd love to play the piano properly. I will learn myself one day.

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The wife's been wanting one for years, and, tbh, I've always fancied one myself.

So, bought an acoustic -- I wanted to go digital initially but she was insistent -- so we've got a refurbed Broadwood upright; I'd heard horror stories about the cheap pianos, not that this was expensive mind.

I play the guitar, although not to any great standard - I taught myself and in hindsight should have had lessons.

Any advice on how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Lessons? I see quite a few study programmes on t'internet', any good?

this is a good online teach-yourself course:

Piano For All

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Ok. Make the call. Don't delay.

You're about a 1000% more likely to improve as you have your own piano.

Ask about block bookings, you'll get a discount. Expect to pay £20-25 an hour for lessons. Remember too - a great player doesn't always make a good teacher, so find out a bit about the teacher before you sign up. Ask if they have a syllabus that you can see. What set pieces do they teach? etc etc

Oh, and order from amazon the AB guide to reading music. Do it now! Good luck.

I'd love to play the piano properly. I will learn myself one day.

Thanks TBF, the book's on its way.

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Guest happy?

The wife's been wanting one for years, and, tbh, I've always fancied one myself.

So, bought an acoustic -- I wanted to go digital initially but she was insistent -- so we've got a refurbed Broadwood upright; I'd heard horror stories about the cheap pianos, not that this was expensive mind.

I play the guitar, although not to any great standard - I taught myself and in hindsight should have had lessons.

Any advice on how to start would be greatly appreciated.

Lessons? I see quite a few study programmes on t'internet', any good?

I would recommend if considering piano lessons it's essential to get a good driving instructor. Reversing around corners (or even tackling 3-point turns) is not to be undertaken lightly whilst playing the Rach 3.

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I would recommend if considering piano lessons it's essential to get a good driving instructor. Reversing around corners (or even tackling 3-point turns) is not to be undertaken lightly whilst playing the Rach 3.

Am I mad enough professor? Am I?

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Regular lessons are essential if you want to do it properly. I wouldn't recommend trying to do it on the cheap via other methods.

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Good on you. When I think of all the uprights smashed up on "Its a Knockout" for entertainment. My (now dead) relatives just seemed to be able to play a piano naturally. I think their playing was based around chords, but they were able to string whole songs together and I never saw them use sheet music (tho sheet music was stashed inside the piano stool IIRC).

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Get a teacher, and go at least as far as Grade 1 with them - which is the basic stuff like reading music and finding the notes on the piano. After seeing how you cope, you can either continue with lessons, or just carry on yourself. My son did this - I taught him myself to about Grade 1 but he's one of those characters who MUST do it himself. He can play Beethoven Sonatas now, although he rarely does.

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that looks pretty comprehensive.

how would one go about downloading this ?

Rapidshare is a popular filesharing site. Whatever is shared is split into multiple RAR files. I think Windows can read these automatically to decompress them, if not, just install Winrar for free.

If you find it too slow to download em all (that is a lot of info) then you might want to buy a rapidshare account for a week or a month. Will allow you to max out your connection.

These are NOT torrents. Therefore, you don't expose yourself to hackers, law firms and anyone else who wants to know.

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Rapidshare is a popular filesharing site. Whatever is shared is split into multiple RAR files. I think Windows can read these automatically to decompress them, if not, just install Winrar for free.

If you find it too slow to download em all (that is a lot of info) then you might want to buy a rapidshare account for a week or a month. Will allow you to max out your connection.

These are NOT torrents. Therefore, you don't expose yourself to hackers, law firms and anyone else who wants to know.

Many thanks. i'll give it a bash later.

(then i'll try and download these files. barrum-tish.)

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People give pianos away for free which should tell you something about how popular they are.

Apart from that just look up fingering positions and start doing scales and arpeggios which would

the equivilient of wax on wax off.

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Ok. Make the call. Don't delay.

You're about a 1000% more likely to improve as you have your own piano.

Ask about block bookings, you'll get a discount. Expect to pay £20-25 an hour for lessons. Remember too - a great player doesn't always make a good teacher, so find out a bit about the teacher before you sign up. Ask if they have a syllabus that you can see. What set pieces do they teach? etc etc

Superb advice from BF. Only to add, if there's a local shop selling musical instruments (any kind might do) ask them if they have a list of teachers - and who they might recommend for teaching adults. Some teachers are great at teaching kids, some prefer adults, and a good shop will be able to tell you. Regular lessons means you're investing time and money - and it will work out so much better if you and teach are compatible

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Thanks for all the advice guys. Corevalue that sounds like a good strategy and good idea about the local music shop Jadoube.

What with the new digital bill I reckon you could end up without an internet connection if you tried to download those files in the UK Rolf.

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Thanks for all the advice guys. Corevalue that sounds like a good strategy and good idea about the local music shop Jadoube.

What with the new digital bill I reckon you could end up without an internet connection if you tried to download those files in the UK Rolf.

The digital bill and other such laws are designed against torrents. They rely on the copyright holder or their lawyers notifying your ISP. So how do they catch you in the act?

Torrents

When you use a torrent, you publish your IP address to anyone else on the tracker. Most people connected to trackers should be other filesharers but many are now also law firms. Your connection to the tracker is all they need and then they contact your ISP. They have proof that you were sharing/uploading copyrighted material.

OTOH if you use a download only service like rapidshare, all you have done is download material. Nobody except your ISP knows you made a download. Your download is one of millions every day, your ISP does not investigate them. There's never been a prosecution for downloading because there is no proof that you intended to obtain copyrighted material without paying for it.

Basically, NEVER use torrents. I used to and don't any longer. They also open your PC up to hackers. They say to hackers, "look at me, don't bother scanning millions of IP addresses to find a computer that will respond to you so that you can hack it. Just go on any popular torrent and you'll immediately get a list of IP addresses to target straight away".

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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