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SarahBell

Kash For Klothes

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Just got a leaflet.

Cash for clothes.

40p a KG of clothing

I assume this is a real sign of the times. People aint giving their clothes away for nothing.

Local Jumble gets about £1 a black bin bag from the rag man at the end.

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Just got a leaflet.

Cash for clothes.

40p a KG of clothing

I assume this is a real sign of the times. People aint giving their clothes away for nothing.

Local Jumble gets about £1 a black bin bag from the rag man at the end.

Get these all the time in Belfast offering 50p per kg collected or 55p delivered. I have friends who volunteer at a local charity shop. They tell me the shop makes on average £25 per bag of clothes donated.

I would rather see this charity make 5 times as much than a rag guy getting it. They eventually sell it to them anyway.

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Get these all the time in Belfast offering 50p per kg collected or 55p delivered. I have friends who volunteer at a local charity shop. They tell me the shop makes on average £25 per bag of clothes donated.

I would rather see this charity make 5 times as much than a rag guy getting it. They eventually sell it to them anyway.

The rag man doesn't sell to charity shops afaik. They sell abroad. Africa and Eastern Europe must be wearing the cast offs.

Someone was after white/cream rags a while ago and was prepared to pay about £2 a kg... I assume that goes for paper though.

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The rag man doesn't sell to charity shops afaik. They sell abroad. Africa and Eastern Europe must be wearing the cast offs.

Someone was after white/cream rags a while ago and was prepared to pay about £2 a kg... I assume that goes for paper though.

I know. I was saying that the rag man eventually gets the rags from the charity shop anyway. At prices close to what they pay Joe public on the leaflets sometime more due to bulk. So I would rather see the net £20 go to the charity as opposed to the rag man.

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Get these all the time in Belfast offering 50p per kg collected or 55p delivered. I have friends who volunteer at a local charity shop. They tell me the shop makes on average £25 per bag of clothes donated.

I would rather see this charity make 5 times as much than a rag guy getting it. They eventually sell it to them anyway.

charity shops are NOT charity.

they provide the lease owner with an income. a leased car and reduced rates. on average the proprietor of a charity shop takes the first 25k + car. the rest are volunteers. if there are any smidges of extra over the 25k that goes to the charity head office, where guess what ? the employees are on terrific wages with plush offices. any smidgen left over after THAT goes to the end charity. i think the actual rate hitting the grass roots of any charity is only 4%

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charity shops are NOT charity.

they provide the lease owner with an income. a leased car and reduced rates. on average the proprietor of a charity shop takes the first 25k + car. the rest are volunteers. if there are any smidges of extra over the 25k that goes to the charity head office, where guess what ? the employees are on terrific wages with plush offices. any smidgen left over after THAT goes to the end charity. i think the actual rate hitting the grass roots of any charity is only 4%

I don’t doubt your figures. But I’d rather give to a charity where a dubious 4% goes to "good causes" than a full 100% goes to a rag guy. Besides I know of several small local organisations here with little over heads generating much more than 4% to the cause.

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I don’t doubt your figures. But I’d rather give to a charity where a dubious 4% goes to "good causes" than a full 100% goes to a rag guy. Besides I know of several small local organisations here with little over heads generating much more than 4% to the cause.

checkout the salaries of the main charity directors.

i think you will be unpleasantly suprised at the 100k's and 300k's.

where is THEIR charity ?

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checkout the salaries of the main charity directors.

i think you will be unpleasantly suprised at the 100k's and 300k's.

where is THEIR charity ?

I'm not talking about national "charities". I agree with you 100% about the big ones being self-serving. I'm talking about small (usually church based but not always. Sometime secular) organisations staffed and managed by actual volunteers. I'm well aware that most charity shops now even have managers and paid staff. I'm also aware through volunteering friends about the massively profitable second hand clothing industry. All Im saying is I'd still rather support a charity know ing4% goes towards furthering social aims than 100% lines an individuals pockets. I've watched several programmes about these seedy individuals.

Edited by 2buyornot2buy

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charity shops are NOT charity.

they provide the lease owner with an income. a leased car and reduced rates. on average the proprietor of a charity shop takes the first 25k + car. the rest are volunteers. if there are any smidges of extra over the 25k that goes to the charity head office, where guess what ? the employees are on terrific wages with plush offices. any smidgen left over after THAT goes to the end charity. i think the actual rate hitting the grass roots of any charity is only 4%

You are wrong on every count in this idiotic post.

1. Oxfam's top salary earner in UK is Barbara Stocking - just over £90K. Use the internet to find out.

2. Charity shops don't have 'proprietors', they have managers. Who don't get cars. Many shops have part-time managers on very small salaries. They nearly all work more hours than they are paid for. A shop manager can earn less than £20K after 10 years service. Gravy train, eh?

3. Shop managers are not leaseholders. Oxfam/Other Charity is the leaseholder. They pay market rent, and get a reduced by 10% or so council tax rate. All other overheads are the same as any other business.

4. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/oxfam_in_action/what_we_do/binmyth_slideshow.html

Oxfam spend 90% of money received directly in the areas where it's needed. Their accounts are available online. As is the top earners salary.

My wife is a deputy Oxfam shop manager. I'm a volunteer.

If you don't want to aid the poor and suffering in the world that's fine, but FFS do some research rather than inventing this rubbish to justify your 'position'.

Edited by juvenal

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charity shops are NOT charity.

they provide the lease owner with an income. a leased car and reduced rates. on average the proprietor of a charity shop takes the first 25k + car. the rest are volunteers. if there are any smidges of extra over the 25k that goes to the charity head office, where guess what ? the employees are on terrific wages with plush offices. any smidgen left over after THAT goes to the end charity. i think the actual rate hitting the grass roots of any charity is only 4%

Always P***** me off as many know I live and have most of our work in London. There are loads of big charities including Save the Children, Childline, Barnados, NSPCC, The Childrens Society etc with massive great offices in London and obviously very well paid workers (we have completed some projects for them) why?

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You are wrong on every count in this idiotic post.

1. Oxfam's top salary earner in UK is Barbara Stocking - just over £90K. Use the internet to find out.

2. Charity shops don't have 'proprietors', they have managers. Who don't get cars. Many shops have part-time managers on very small salaries. They nearly all work more hours than they are paid for. A shop manager can earn less than £20K after 10 years service. Gravy train, eh?

3. Shop managers are not leaseholders. Oxfam/Other Charity is the leaseholder. They pay market rent, and get a reduced by 10% or so council tax rate. All other overheads are the same as any other business.

4. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/oxfam_in_action/what_we_do/binmyth_slideshow.html

Oxfam spend 90% of money received directly in the areas where it's needed. Their accounts are available online. As is the top earners salary.

My wife is a deputy Oxfam shop manager. I'm a volunteer.

If you don't want to aid the poor and suffering in the world that's fine, but FFS do some research rather than inventing this rubbish to justify your 'position'.

pwned-catkick.jpg

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Always P***** me off as many know I live and have most of our work in London. There are loads of big charities including Save the Children, Childline, Barnados, NSPCC, The Childrens Society etc with massive great offices in London and obviously very well paid workers (we have completed some projects for them) why?

http://society.guardian.co.uk/salarysurvey/table/0,12406,1042677,00.html

This link is out of date but gives a general idea.

I can only speak about Oxfam. Their top earner pulls under £100K, to head an empire that turns over £230 million pa, runs 800 shops in the UK, and is the biggest bookseller in Europe. The job involves constant travel and meeting Heads of State etc. Doesn't seem overpaid to me.

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checkout the salaries of the main charity directors.

i think you will be unpleasantly suprised at the 100k's and 300k's.

where is THEIR charity ?

heres another one caught out again...this place is full of them..

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You are wrong on every count in this idiotic post.

1. Oxfam's top salary earner in UK is Barbara Stocking - just over £90K. Use the internet to find out.

2. Charity shops don't have 'proprietors', they have managers. Who don't get cars. Many shops have part-time managers on very small salaries. They nearly all work more hours than they are paid for. A shop manager can earn less than £20K after 10 years service. Gravy train, eh?

3. Shop managers are not leaseholders. Oxfam/Other Charity is the leaseholder. They pay market rent, and get a reduced by 10% or so council tax rate. All other overheads are the same as any other business.

4. http://www.oxfam.org.uk/oxfam_in_action/what_we_do/binmyth_slideshow.html

Oxfam spend 90% of money received directly in the areas where it's needed. Their accounts are available online. As is the top earners salary.

My wife is a deputy Oxfam shop manager. I'm a volunteer.

If you don't want to aid the poor and suffering in the world that's fine, but FFS do some research rather than inventing this rubbish to justify your 'position'.

strange. i thought the oxfam chief director salary was currently £360k PA. and i am sure our local charity shop manager has a leased mercedes. and id like to aid the poor and suffering, but i cant find the link between rich charity workers in central london wages and the poor of bum fXck africa. perhaps mark thatcher can find the link.?

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heres another one caught out again...this place is full of them..

It's funny, when there's a topic that you have some expertise on you soon see how much rubbish is posted.

That probably indicates how much reliance we should all be placing in the threads upon which we DON'T have expertise.

Not saying it's all rubbish of course, but there's a siginificant proportion of incomplete pictures and even in this case totally incorrect information.

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I don’t doubt your figures. But I’d rather give to a charity where a dubious 4% goes to "good causes" than a full 100% goes to a rag guy. Besides I know of several small local organisations here with little over heads generating much more than 4% to the cause.

Some are worse than others.. the problem is knowing which are good /bad.

I spent a day working for one that (I considered) was a total scam. But others are good.

I try not to give to charities that I feel will spend most of their money fighting legal battles. I try not to give to charities I feel are wasteful or un-necessary.

Personally I support the RNLI.. but if I really wanted to commit a charitable act I would give money to a homeless person here in the UK, or better yet.. offer them a job (if I could).

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I had one of those leaflets offering 50p per kilo of clothes through the door a couple of weeks ago.I volunteer for a small,local Charity shop,and we've been getting 60p per kilo,and will soon be switching to another Rag Man offering 70p/kilo.(The current buyer takes shoes,too.) I estimate that about 15% of our takings are from the unsaleable clothing,and it also means that we can keep the cost of bin collections down.(Not all charities offer enormous wages..our Manageress is on £7 per hour,and works a contracted 26-hour week.) I actually feel young when I volunteer..many of the others are nearly 80 years old! Good fun,too.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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