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Revealed: Uk Towns Where It's Hardest To Find A Job

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jobs/7871466/Revealed-UK-towns-where-its-hardest-to-find-a-job.html

A study by the Work Foundation found the three Northern cities were the hardest hit from the recession, with "very low" levels of employment in growth sectors combined with relatively low-skilled populations.

All three areas also rely heavily on public sector jobs, meaning they will take a further hit when the Government sheds hundreds of thousands of state workers to bring down the country's deficit.

Other cities that made it into the worst 10 UK locations were Blackpool, Liverpool and Mansfield. Just one unemployment hot spot, Hastings, was in the South East, the report, due to be published at the Work Foundation/ OECD conference on Thursday, found.

In contrast, Reading, Cambridge and London have been earmarked to experience considerable growth and are set to come out of the recession relatively unscathed, the analysis showed.

About a third of the population in each of the growing cities hold degrees, compared to just over 10pc in the worst three Northern cities. Both Reading and London rely less on public-sector employment, and are set to benefit from growth in key sectors.

The report said small and medium-sized firms would grow in the creative sectors, such as advertising or gaming, and services-led manufacturing.

Although Cambridge relies more on public sector employment – currently 30pc of its population work in the sector - it will be likely to benefit from robust growth the emerging sectors, the report said.

Clearly this is easy to fix, we need more people from Barnsley, Doncaster and Grimsby to get degrees.

Next problem please.

Anyone know how these towns rank in the public sector as a percentage of working population. How high up the table are they?

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Clearly this is easy to fix, we need more people from Barnsley, Doncaster and Grimsby to get degrees.

Crikey! It's DONCASTER yet again! :o

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Such a true comment from the story:-

Barnsley and Doncaster (as part of the "Socialist Republic of South Yorkshire") suffer because, like their bigger neighbour Sheffield, they have scared away private business for the last 60 years believing they could establish some sort of workers paradise.

Unfortunately, they forget that it's the rest of the UK that has to pay for their utopian dream.

1/3rd of their populations work in the public sector and 1/2 the remaining population work for companies that are mostly dependent upon public sector business for their revenues.

When the nation has to pick up the tab for Labour profligacy yet again, the result of job losses with no alternative economy to soak them up should be obvious to everyone.

Unfortunately not to the people that live there.

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London is one of the top for public sector employment but the article implies it's low.

In terms of workers London has by far the most, as a % of the population it's just above average but as a % of those in employment the lowest.

The Q1 2010 public sector estimate is 28,000 higher than the same quarter a year ago.

A regional analysis of public sector employment (see Table 6) shows that London is the region with

the largest number of employees (782,000) followed by the North West (696,000), the South East

(694,000) and Scotland (610,000).

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=13615&Pos=&ColRank=1&Rank=422

As a proportion of all who are in employment it was one of the lowest with 17.8% in 2008 , the highest being

Northern Irelend 28.8% the second highest is Wales 23.9%

As a proportion of total resident population it was just higher than the UK average of about 10% in 2008

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/CCI/article.asp?ID=2276

Even more interesing for the sad like me, London has High unemployment, low economic activity, high economic

inactivity and low overall employment.

London has the lowest employment rate of all regional areas (apart from

Northern Ireland who skew all statistics)

http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=1944

Edited by Northwest Smith

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Although still clearly in something of a bubble I think it seriously unlikely London will escape 'unscathed'.

It has not escaped unscathed.

At the last count there were 318,000 unemployed in London , that's unemployed and claiming jsa , how many others are there that are not counted as unemployed as they are on benefits of another kind or are lost in manipulation of the numbers. I also know of four people in London unemployed and not claiming .

London has been hit like everywhere else.

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It has not escaped unscathed.

At the last count there were 318,000 unemployed in London , that's unemployed and claiming jsa , how many others are there that are not counted as unemployed as they are on benefits of another kind or are lost in manipulation of the numbers. I also know of four people in London unemployed and not claiming .

London has been hit like everywhere else.

I travel the whole country all the time and have a strong indication of regional spending habits - it simply has not been hit in the same way many other areas have.

Basically the left-hand side from Reading around the top through Herts to Essex and bottom through Kent are a great big bubble. It starts to go out of it again at the shabbier part of Essex and the Gravesend part of Kent.

There are always the obvious areas of deprivation within London but they're always there.

Edited by Soon Not a Chain Retailer

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Don't move to Doncaster, Barnsley or Grimsby

Always good advice, whatever the state of the economy.

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I live in central London and I'm unemployed, though happily so.

London benefits from a ridiculous amount of public sector employment and the areas around London are properous mainly because of their proximity to the capital.

Maybe we should change the capital city back to York and see how the Home Counties get on after that...

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I travel the whole country all the time and have a strong indication of regional spending habits - it simply has not been hit in the same way many other areas have.

Basically the left-hand side from Reading around the top through Herts to Essex and bottom through Kent are a great big bubble. It starts to go out of it again at the shabbier part of Essex and the Gravesend part of Kent.

There are always the obvious areas of deprivation within London but they're always there.

Agree to certain extent , but it has still been hit.

If your in retail and looking at London figures they have stayed strong , however how much of that is tourists flocking to the capital from abroad due to the weak pound.

Yes London has always had areas of deprivation ( try explaing that to Ian duncan Smith ) who was addvocating making it easy for people to move to the capital to look for work. But I know relatives , friends and work mates from all over those areas that you describe and know people that have been hit , maybe its not as bad as everywhere else but the downturn is leaving its mark .

As you said it will not be unscathed . One big problem I see in London and its frindges is the amount of debt the people have and the massive IO mortgages , a loss of a job and big reduction in earning power and those big mortgages are going to be unpayable. I know a few that it has already happened to.

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Doncaster, interesting place, HIV capital of the UK and girls (and I presume blokes) with interesting morals. Its a small place but Im sure every lad ib the uk knew a handful of girls from donny when they were younger

Edited by AteMoose

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Such a true comment from the story:-

Indeed. I spent my university years in Nottingham and Sheffield, and could not get over how every other building that wasnt a house was some kind of community centre, youth centre, outreach centre, mother and child centre, diversity centre and so on. For me, coming from a small town in the south east, where theres a village hall and thats about it(paid for by local fundraising, council didnt want anything to do with it) this was really eyeopening.

Not much good it did anyway, most of these buildings sole purpose seemed to be to provide somewhere for youths to vandalise, or hone their arson skills. Take a look round the estates on northern cities on streetview. Unless its raining theyre just full of young mothers and kids sitting around in a rubbish strewn front garden, or groups of young males (actually anything up to the age of 40) sitting around swigging carling.

Its endemic. This country is lost. It has no economy. Its a dieing entitlement state.

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  • 258 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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