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Gigantic Purple Slug

Best Coffee Machine

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OK - I know this may be a bit domesticated for the rebellious HPC crew, but I really like decent coffee. So much so I have earmarked a tidy sum to purchase a coffee machine.

I want something that does cappacinos and latte. Expresso is off the list. Prefereably as easy to use as possible and should deliver a great cup of coffee.

Anyone out there have something they like in this regard ?

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OK - I know this may be a bit domesticated for the rebellious HPC crew, but I really like decent coffee. So much so I have earmarked a tidy sum to purchase a coffee machine.

I want something that does cappacinos and latte. Expresso is off the list. Prefereably as easy to use as possible and should deliver a great cup of coffee.

Anyone out there have something they like in this regard ?

If you want it to do lattes and cappucinos, then it will have to do espresso by default since that's the base ingredient. Machines that do the whole thing including the milk frothing automatically are more expensive and more complex (hence unreliable) than ones that do the coffee part and provide a steamer so you can do the milk by hand. I have one of these which I can certainly recommend:

http://www.electricshopping.com/shop/shop.do?pID=11552&cID=49

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If cleaning is an issue for you, then consider a pod-based Nespresso system. I got one earlier this year and the coffee is excellent. The basic units cost about £100, and pods work out at around 25p each. And absolutely no cleaning required.

If you pop in to John Lewis they're usually happy to give you a demo and let you sample the cofee.

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Like my coffee strong and dark, but if you make it in this then mix it with warm milk it will be delicious...it would also be nice black with brandy.

moka-300.jpg

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buy a coffee grinder, krups do one for 30 quid ish. And any machine. Ours has a timer on it, we also have a jug as shown above for the stove. coffee is just hot water, why spend lots on it, unless you want a dumbed down nestle machine?

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If cleaning is an issue for you, then consider a pod-based Nespresso system. I got one earlier this year and the coffee is excellent. The basic units cost about £100, and pods work out at around 25p each. And absolutely no cleaning required.

If you pop in to John Lewis they're usually happy to give you a demo and let you sample the cofee.

Agreed they produce good coffee but aren't you tied to buying the pod things online from Nestle forever?

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Agreed they produce good coffee but aren't you tied to buying the pod things online from Nestle forever?

Yes, that is a factor. But I wanted a cheap, easy to use, easy to clean system which still - importantly - delivered very good coffee. £100 was my budget rather than £400. Having said that, the pods probably work out more expensive in the long run than beans/grounds.

It's a bit like buying a printer for peanuts and paying more for the ink!

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Like my coffee strong and dark, but if you make it in this then mix it with warm milk it will be delicious...it would also be nice black with brandy.

moka-300.jpg

No substitute. Only way to drink coffee. I don't let cow juice near it.

Sirloin steak with a dry rub of coffee grounds is delicious - one tsp per steak plus 1/2 tsp of brown sugar + salt + pepper. Whack into smoking oil on pan, two minutes each side. Black crust, red flesh.

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Yes, that is a factor. But I wanted a cheap, easy to use, easy to clean system which still - importantly - delivered very good coffee. £100 was my budget rather than £400. Having said that, the pods probably work out more expensive in the long run than beans/grounds.

It's a bit like buying a printer for peanuts and paying more for the ink!

What I have described above is cheap and easy to clean.....better to buy beans keep freshness for longer, grind it as you need it, if you buy already ground see that is the right ground size for the type of machine you use...all coffee can keep well in the freezer. I would not recommend that you buy any machine that uses pods, you are then tied to them and the high price they charge.

If you would likes something more upmarket Gagia is very good, some of them both grind and make the coffee. ;)

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Like my coffee strong and dark, but if you make it in this then mix it with warm milk it will be delicious...it would also be nice black with brandy.

moka-300.jpg

Works for me..

Mine's a bit rough and battered now, but still makes a fantastic cup of the black stuff.

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Like my coffee strong and dark, but if you make it in this then mix it with warm milk it will be delicious...it would also be nice black with brandy.

moka-300.jpg

Yep, that´s what your typical Italian or Spanish person has in their home. Unless you buy something near commercial grade most ´epsresso machines´ just don´t cut it.

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Yes, that is a factor. But I wanted a cheap, easy to use, easy to clean system which still - importantly - delivered very good coffee. £100 was my budget rather than £400. Having said that, the pods probably work out more expensive in the long run than beans/grounds.

It's a bit like buying a printer for peanuts and paying more for the ink!

A bit like the old Polaroid cameras too. The cost tradeoff is an intersting one and I suspect it depends on how much you use the machine. If it's 10 cups a day the 400 one probably works out cheaper but if it's 1 or 2 the pod-machine probably costs less. Still, for anyone that cares about the taste of the product, the nespresso machines are way ahead of anything else in their initial purchase price range.

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By coincidence, I'm also looking for a new coffee maker - old percolator died a short while ago. I tried replacing it with a coffee press, but I am definitely less than impressed.

In fact, Mrs DeepLurker (a Parisian) described the output as "barely better than instant" :(

So I'll be keeping a close eye on this thread for ideas... :)

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Gaggia Classic looks the biz, buy s/h on ebay somehwere near £100.

Sell a few years later for £100 (plus maybe).

The Cubikas seem to be going cheaper but seen stuff that suggests they look the part but have been built down to a price.

Oh, plus decent grinder.

Here's one for £90 - Putney. Probably gone but they can be bought for that sort of price.

http://www.gumtree.com/london/46/59309546.html

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Like my coffee strong and dark, but if you make it in this then mix it with warm milk it will be delicious...it would also be nice black with brandy.

moka-300.jpg

Used this model a lot, the one with a crema nozzle inside (only a slight mod on the 1930s(?) original). Trouble with using it on my hob though is that it tends to get too hot and the handle is now loose as is the top threaded black thing - anyone know where I can get replacement parts?

The other thing is you have to watch it and take it off the heat the second it starts pok-pok-poking.

As you say, super strong so you tend to add more (hot) milk than you normally would.

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Nespresso machines are good, the espressos they make are excellent quality.

The monopoly situation on the capsules is over, more and more competitors appearing over here (none that are as good yet AFAIK).

If you drink a lot of coffee they're expensive.

BTW none of these machines will make you good coffee if you have horrible tapwater and you use that tapwater to make your coffee.

It never ceases to amaze me that people forget that the biggest ingredient in coffee is water.

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Used this model a lot, the one with a crema nozzle inside (only a slight mod on the 1930s(?) original). Trouble with using it on my hob though is that it tends to get too hot and the handle is now loose as is the top threaded black thing - anyone know where I can get replacement parts?

The other thing is you have to watch it and take it off the heat the second it starts pok-pok-poking.

As you say, super strong so you tend to add more (hot) milk than you normally would.

Yep.

Excellent, but the coffee is undrinkable if you leave it for 10 seconds too long.

Hence I threw it in the bin.

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If you want it to do lattes and cappucinos, then it will have to do espresso by default since that's the base ingredient. Machines that do the whole thing including the milk frothing automatically are more expensive and more complex (hence unreliable) than ones that do the coffee part and provide a steamer so you can do the milk by hand. I have one of these which I can certainly recommend:

http://www.electricshopping.com/shop/shop.do?pID=11552&cID=49

I have one with steamer. Rather cheaper than yours: it was just under £100 in about 1999. Makes a nice espresso (which is what really matters to me), but the frother is fiddly and doesn't produce the greatest cappuccino.

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OK, what is your budget ? 'A tidy sum' could be anything from £100 - £1000. I don't like nespresso machines as they dictate to me what kind of coffee I can have, because you can only use the pods in them, this goes against my broad libertarian streak. If you are after stove top the classic Italian Bialetti are fine, though they are made of aluminium which does have health implications, I have a stainless steel Bialetti Venus linky. This makes excellent coffee. If you want a classic espresso machine the undoubted best is the Pavoni linky this makes fantastic 'proper' espresso and as it is lever operated you decide on the pressure exerted on the coffee grounds which will determine strength, taste etc. For a good low/mid price machine Briel are good linky. If you want to grind your own beans for your machine, you need a 'burr' grinder as this can accurately grind the beans to the requisite size, a regular grinder just chops the beans rather than grinding them, this is fine for a filter but not for an espresso machine. The machine  I will be buying shortly is a Francis Francis linky , good espresso is about the pressure of the steam blown through the grounds, this machine has 18bar, which is good. Any machine which advertises less than 15bar is unlikely to be any good.

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OK, what is your budget ? 'A tidy sum' could be anything from £100 - £1000. I don't like nespresso machines as they dictate to me what kind of coffee I can have, because you can only use the pods in them, this goes against my broad libertarian streak. If you are after stove top the classic Italian Bialetti are fine, though they are made of aluminium which does have health implications, I have a stainless steel Bialetti Venus linky. This makes excellent coffee. If you want a classic espresso machine the undoubted best is the Pavoni linky this makes fantastic 'proper' espresso and as it is lever operated you decide on the pressure exerted on the coffee grounds which will determine strength, taste etc. For a good low/mid price machine Briel are good linky. If you want to grind your own beans for your machine, you need a 'burr' grinder as this can accurately grind the beans to the requisite size, a regular grinder just chops the beans rather than grinding them, this is fine for a filter but not for an espresso machine. The machine  I will be buying shortly is a Francis Francis linky , good espresso is about the pressure of the steam blown through the grounds, this machine has 18bar, which is good. Any machine which advertises less than 15bar is unlikely to be any good.

I think most machines have pressure regulators in them anyway - about 9 bar for optimal head pressure. Much more than that and you will be jeting the water through the coffee grinds.

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I think most machines have pressure regulators in them anyway - about 9 bar for optimal head pressure. Much more than that and you will be jeting the water through the coffee grinds.

That's why the Pavoni is such a great machine, you regulate the pressure yourself.

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Used this model a lot, the one with a crema nozzle inside (only a slight mod on the 1930s(?) original). Trouble with using it on my hob though is that it tends to get too hot and the handle is now loose as is the top threaded black thing - anyone know where I can get replacement parts?

The other thing is you have to watch it and take it off the heat the second it starts pok-pok-poking.

As you say, super strong so you tend to add more (hot) milk than you normally would.

One thing I would say is as soon as you start to hear the pok-pok-poking, an excellent description, turn the heat off it will carry on pushing the coffee up until all the water is gone and is finished, if you don't do that the coffee will burn start smelling and spoil....also you don't need to fill the funnel filter that you put the coffee in right up, half full can be sufficient for good cups of coffee......in regard to replacement parts I have only ever needed to replace the rubber seal that you can purchase quite easily. ;)

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I just use a spoon...part of a set of 12 we have in the drawer. about £2.50 for a pod that makes 50 cups.

simples.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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