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Guest Noodle

The more I see the more I believe Marx was right. Global capitalism running roughshod over indigenous traditions and homogeneising everyone. You know supporting Man U gives a Thai villager the sense of belonging that was killed by globalisation.

I don't think it's that bad. 90% of trade is small traders, Makro has improved the supply chain somewhat.

Biggest threat is externalized costs, 7/11's plastic bags mostly.

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Guest Skinty

(PS. we took high strength vit c - only thing that worked against the midges!)

I'll have to try that. Blokey and I load up on raw garlic days beforehand. Helps with ticks as well.

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Huddersfield is an ethnic dumping ground, a post industrial slum, complete with the attendant high crime, racial divisions etc etc.

Oh, please don't say this. I am trying to pretend that it isn't happening because I find it so heart-breaking. I avoid going there now because it is just such a shock. One of the final straws was about six months ago when I went into the indoor market and, well, I just couldn't believe it. The place was empty and full of vacant units. In all my youth -- during the crisis in the 70s, the de-industrialisation of the 80s and the recessive early 90s -- that market was always thriving, the units were always at pretty much full capacity.

One of my old friends, a Asian Muslim chap, caught up with me a few months ago, and said he couldn't believe how much things had deteriorated in Huddersfield over the last fifteen years, particularly in terms of inter-racial harmony. He also said he thinks the town itself is just becoming a derelict cesspit.

And when I think about what it was like in the late 80s and early 90s, I remember -- must be back in 1991 now -- a group of us had come back from a club night and I remember us talking about how we would be the last generation to ever see racial prejudice, because we'd all grown up together, gone to school together, gone clubbing and raving together, we knew each others parents ... so our children just wouldn't even understand the concept of assuming someone was integrally different to you because they were a different skin colour. And that is how we understood racism back then, racism (or racial prejudice, "being prej" as we called it) was about assuming someone was different, or treating someone differently, just because they were from another ethnic background.

How unbelievably naive we were. I would never have dreamt that a government (a supposedly left wing government!) would come along and advocate identity politics, and support an ideology that stated people should be treated differently than others just because they were from a different ethnic background, that there should be different expectations -- the principles of "multiculturalism" would have struck us as heavily racist back then.

But that was all before the startlingly obvious mass immigration of the last thirteen years into, what was, a fairly settled community in many respects, where all the young people, be they children of indigenous or immigrant families, shared more or less the same cultural values. Now it is all very, very different. The circumstances that created our views have gone.

Sometimes, I feel like the 21st century's Stefan Zweig, looking back over the world of my youth, a world that has gone and will not return.

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Luxury! Me and me brother had to make those watches! Had nothin' but old baked bean cans and a press formed from a second-hand can opener. Guvner used to whip us with barbed wire every 10 minutes from when we started at 4 a.m. until we went back to the lake at 3 a.m. Father used to break our noses with a brick for being late home.

p-o-p

Watches?! You don't know you were born. Back when I were a lad, we had to walk 15 miles to the nearest sundial and that was considered a family day trip. As nobody knew the time we worked producing mottle and daub until we passed out, and only then were we allowed a drink made from the moisture that could be extracted from the local mud.

We could only dream of bricks and 23 hour days.

Edited by Chef
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Oh, please don't say this. I am trying to pretend that it isn't happening because I find it so heart-breaking. I avoid going there now because it is just such a shock. One of the final straws was about six months ago when I went into the indoor market and, well, I just couldn't believe it. The place was empty and full of vacant units. In all my youth -- during the crisis in the 70s, the de-industrialisation of the 80s and the recessive early 90s -- that market was always thriving, the units were always at pretty much full capacity.

One of my old friends, a Asian Muslim chap, caught up with me a few months ago, and said he couldn't believe how much things had deteriorated in Huddersfield over the last fifteen years, particularly in terms of inter-racial harmony. He also said he thinks the town itself is just becoming a derelict cesspit.

And when I think about what it was like in the late 80s and early 90s, I remember -- must be back in 1991 now -- a group of us had come back from a club night and I remember us talking about how we would be the last generation to ever see racial prejudice, because we'd all grown up together, gone to school together, gone clubbing and raving together, we knew each others parents ... so our children just wouldn't even understand the concept of assuming someone was integrally different to you because they were a different skin colour. And that is how we understood racism back then, racism (or racial prejudice, "being prej" as we called it) was about assuming someone was different, or treating someone differently, just because they were from another ethnic background.

How unbelievably naive we were. I would never have dreamt that a government (a supposedly left wing government!) would come along and advocate identity politics, and support an ideology that stated people should be treated differently than others just because they were from a different ethnic background, that there should be different expectations -- the principles of "multiculturalism" would have struck us as heavily racist back then.

But that was all before the startlingly obvious mass immigration of the last thirteen years into, what was, a fairly settled community in many respects, where all the young people, be they children of indigenous or immigrant families, shared more or less the same cultural values. Now it is all very, very different. The circumstances that created our views have gone.

Sometimes, I feel like the 21st century's Stefan Zweig, looking back over the world of my youth, a world that has gone and will not return.

Heartbreaking I know :(

The experiment(s) has gone badly wrong.

It fell off a cliff when Blair got in, they have destroyed the fabric of the town.

The future is going to get very hard without community to glue stuff together.

Sooooooo glad I'm out before it kicks off over the next decade or so :ph34r:

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Many years ago I had a summer job in a factory. One day it was putting straps onto watches; the next day it was taking said straps off the watches. This happened on a regular basis throughout the summer. This was in the 1970s. All this shows is that nothing really changes.

In the 70's I made a bit of pocket money at home doing piece work...putting a plastic knife, spoon and fork into a plastic bags for the airline food industry...also attached fishing bobbins onto sales display cards...got so good and quick doing it, could do it without looking and at the same time watch the TV.

These handy pin-money jobs are now no longer around....there are people/machines out there that will do it for far less. :blink:

Edit: machines and people. ;)

Edited by winkie
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