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interestrateripoff

Family's Country Estate Goes On The Market For First Time In 1,000 Years... At An Asking Price Of £12Million

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1290586/12m-country-estate-goes-market-time-1-000-years.html

Anyone who has had their eyes on buying this house may have had to wait quite a while.

Well, nearly 1,000 years to be precise, which is how long Shakenhurst Hall and its estate have stayed in the hands of just one family.

But after a grand history in which it was tied to such momentous events as the Battle of Hastings and the Hundred Years War, the rather exclusive property is finally coming on the market.

The only problem is it comes at an asking price of £12 million pounds - slightly more than it was worth when listed in the Domesday Book back in 1086.

The Grade II listed main property boasts 13 bedrooms and seven bathrooms and stands in 1,300 acres of gardens and land containing six farms and 12 houses and cottages.

Part of it is thought to have been gifted to a French baron by William the Conqueror as a reward for his part in the Norman Conquest.

The entire estate at Cleobury Mortimer, near Kidderminster, was later passed to one his descendents - John de Meysey - as a gift by King Edward III in 1349.

Looks a bargain....

Edited by interestrateripoff

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Thieving French b*****s, it belonged to my family before the Norman Conquest.

Might is right, as we are relearning from the same old ruling families of Camoron and co.

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Disgusting.

They stole land of the peasants much like europeans did in Zimbabwe. I dont agree with the way its been done there, but any land that hasnt changed hands at true market price in the last 100 years should be taxed at 99%.

Land ownership is probably about as fairly distributed in the UK as it was in 1970s Rhodesia too.

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The aristocracy is, to some extent, a privileged ethnic minority, with a much larger element of Norman ancestry than the rest of us.

Edited by blankster

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The aristocracy is, to some extent, a privileged ethnic minority, with a much larger element of Norman ancestry than the rest of us.

Not really, the DNA doesn't hold that to be true.

My family & family name came over in 1066, but I have ginger stubble and Viking, Khazak, mongol, jewish high priest and erm welsh :( genes in my DNA.

I'm still a penniless peasant if that makes you feel any better, I think it's the welsh bit ;)

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Well, my Norman forefathers got their land by killing the local princeling in Mid Wales and then forcibly marrying his daughter to a family member old enough to be her grandfather. Nice! Don't think many of the Normans were actually from Normany either - most came from other parts of France I think - they did in these parts anyway.

Edited by gruffydd

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Thieving French b*****s, it belonged to my family before the Norman Conquest.

Might is right, as we are relearning from the same old ruling families of Camoron and co.

If you can prove that, you could probably make a claim for it in the EU courts.

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My heart is bleeding.

12 million asking price.

I'm only offering 6. They can live on the bread line for all I care.

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Bread?

Let them eat cake!

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The Domesday Book page I tried seemed to be under construction for Shropshire so I wasn't able to see appreciation on a 1000 year timescale. There's this piece on it 's sale at here and Google map view if you want to have a nosey round the pad.

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http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/life.html

Rents, Tax and Manorial Values

The total value of the land in Domesday has been estimated at about £73,000 a year. The most common form of land ownership was under-tenancies, whose holders owed military services to their lords, and subsequently to the King. Another form was leasing or renting land for money, often large amounts. Thaxted in Essex, for example, was worth £30 in 1066 and £60 in 1086, but its holder had leased it to an Englishman for an annual amount of £60. The tenant was unable to pay and defaulted on at least £10 a year.

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Pretty cheap I think. But I should imagine the running costs are probably over a million a year. All that land has to be managed and listed building need lots of repairs.

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Guest The Relaxation Suite

Not really, the DNA doesn't hold that to be true.

My family & family name came over in 1066, but I have ginger stubble and Viking, Khazak, mongol, jewish high priest and erm welsh :( genes in my DNA.

I'm still a penniless peasant if that makes you feel any better, I think it's the welsh bit ;)

Welsh genes - lucky you boyo! Nothing to be ashamed of. A genuine Briton whose ancestors probably inhabited Britain for 5000 years. The tone of the thread is right - the Normans started the inequitable land-ownership business in Britain, through seizures and force. But we can hardly blame those who innocently inherited it today, can we?

We musn't be hypocrites, after all. Any one of us born into all that wouldn't be tripping over ourselves to give it all back.

PS Frankfurt school Marxism aka political correctness is funny isn't it? If you had put the workd Jewish in reduced font you would be seen as an entirely different sort of person.

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So they got the land by, to all intents and purposes, fighting

I wouldn't if they would fight me and a few bus fulls of my mates for it this afternoon?

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Unless the other assets in the package are seriously peachy I don't think the main house warrants 12 mil.

Well for a start 1300 acres is a pretty peachy asset... if you look at the roll call of assets the house itself is probably of minimal cast within the whole .... it could work out something like this...

Farmland 1300 acres ( could be as high as £10,000 an acre, knock it back to £6,000 to allow for less god land/ lower cost of woodland etc)- £7,800,000

12 cottages ( I think thats what it said, some look like small cottages, others like larger farmhouses. In that area I'd be surprised if any are worth less than £250,000)- £3,000,000

Sporting rights ( not fishing) - these will be something like £100,000

Fishing rights-Perhaps £50,000

That gets you to somehting like £11,000,000. This is probably reduced a little by the farms being tenanted ( depending on the type of tenancy) so say £9,000,000, which means the house as a seperate element with a bit of parkland might be somewhere in the region of £3,000,000.

There's probably a story behind the asking price otherwise I would argue it might well be much too low..... attracting numerous bidders, main house and cottages needing heavy investment, old tenancies on the bulk of the farmland and houses etc etc.... I would have otherwise expected an estate of this size with that many cottages which hadn't been starved of investment and was all in hand rather than tenanted to go for something closer to £15- £20m

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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