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...plastered across the front page.

No link yet...but one should be available shortly.

It looks like we've reverted back 2 years on this form. Second (more permanent) leg down looks to be forthcoming.

Thursday could be interesting.

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Guest Steve Cook

...plastered across the front page.

No link yet...but one should be available shortly.

It looks like we've reverted back 2 years on this form. Second (more permanent) leg down looks to be forthcoming.

Thursday could be interesting.

just seen that on Newsnight

Loving it...:lol:

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...plastered across the front page.

No link yet...but one should be available shortly.

It looks like we've reverted back 2 years on this form. Second (more permanent) leg down looks to be forthcoming.

Thursday could be interesting.

I'm sure the readers of the Indy will be aghast......both of them! ;)

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There you go

15656872.jpg

"Fewer mortgage approvals, a dip in consumer confidence and shares at a nine-month low lead The Independent to suggest that a housing market crash is unavoidable."

Edited by Jonnybegood

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Yes, I too have just seen this on Newsnight...

The presenter said the front page of this paper gives us various reasons why things are not looking too good (for housing market).

but at least the front page of the Express has good news, because it says the "Soaring £ saves £700 on Family holidays." :lol:

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good news cēterīs paribus but, 'fing is, i think most people on here hoped that, you know, lending criteria would tighten up so that they'd be able to buy something decent for 2-3 times joint salary like back in the day.

what use will cheaper houses be to the million plus new unemployed?

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There you go

15656872.jpg

"Fewer mortgage approvals, a dip in consumer confidence and shares at a nine-month low lead The Independent to suggest that a housing market crash is unavoidable."

But as all us learned readers know all these factors will lead to an unheralded boom in prices - the Daily Diana will tell us so on their front page in just a couple of days.

After all, what is the readership of the Independent compared to the Diana? (no don't answer that the result will be profoundly depressing).

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Guest Noodle

If the printing stops. If the bailing stops.

You will have your crash.

But how many will have a stable job to get a mortgage and keep paying a mortgage?

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The independent front cover made me smile too. The impact of the media has a real influence, and front page news headlines like this will also go some way to changing sentiment. Whilst it doesn't have the largest readership, how many people will glance at the headline in the shop, on a train or see it on the telly or the internet?

Also on newsnight, nice to see that final salary pensions in the public sector look like they will FINALLY be tackled ... i.e. Joe Bloggs puts more £££ aside, less money for the mortgage or the new house, or the kids' deposits. "Head in the sand" was an expression used to describe Labour's approach to these mounting issues, together with "kicking the problem down the road". On a personal note, I'm delighted to see much more realism from Lib/Lab in confronting our situation and telling it as it is - this should also help shift sentiment regarding house prices.

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But as all us learned readers know all these factors will lead to an unheralded boom in prices - the Daily Diana will tell us so on their front page in just a couple of days.

After all, what is the readership of the Independent compared to the Diana? (no don't answer that the result will be profoundly depressing).

The Sun and The Mail each sell TEN TIMES the number of copies each day that the Indie does, I'm afraid.

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Yes, but its on the Front page..............Mail/Sun readers will see it...........penny will drop.

Mike

Only those that can read.

Plus, many Sun readers will probably live in council housing, if stereotypes are to be believed.

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Yes, but when you pick up your tabloid you glance at the Indie.

Or sit on the bus/tube reading the Sport and spot the headlines on the paper being read by the toff opposite.

I'm struggling here....

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Thing is in reality its going to take another 2 years to get back to where we were in 2008, cuts are going to be phased in between now and 2013.

The public sector are notoriously slow at implementing change and there is always a danger of renewed effort to keep things artificially inflated with a co ordinated European approach.

Friends of mine who have been renting since 2003 are unlikely to be able to buy before 2012 and then mortgage tightening and job threats worsen, they kept thinking the crash was coming 2005 and stuck to renting, then they thought 2008 was it and continued renting and now they believe its 2012.

In the last 7 years they have spent nearly £80k on rent, by the time they buy it will be almost £100k.

Back in 2003 they thought paying £155k for a 3 bed semi that was selling for £105k in late 1990s was crazy, now they have spent over half that price in rent alone and houses in the same area in 2009 were then selling for £245k.

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Yes, but its on the Front page..............Mail/Sun readers will see it...........penny will drop.

Mike

It may have dropped already. My estate agent phoned this morning. He said that it has gone completely dead in the last ten days (in terms of buyers). He said he couldn't understand it.... :rolleyes:

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Thing is in reality its going to take another 2 years to get back to where we were in 2008, cuts are going to be phased in between now and 2013.

The public sector are notoriously slow at implementing change and there is always a danger of renewed effort to keep things artificially inflated with a co ordinated European approach.

Friends of mine who have been renting since 2003 are unlikely to be able to buy before 2012 and then mortgage tightening and job threats worsen, they kept thinking the crash was coming 2005 and stuck to renting, then they thought 2008 was it and continued renting and now they believe its 2012.

In the last 7 years they have spent nearly £80k on rent, by the time they buy it will be almost £100k.

Back in 2003 they thought paying £155k for a 3 bed semi that was selling for £105k in late 1990s was crazy, now they have spent over half that price in rent alone and houses in the same area in 2009 were then selling for £245k.

What would the total interest cost have been on the mortgage to date? And what will the interest cost be in two years time? Curious.

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  • 146 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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