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Mikhail Liebenstein

The Quarter Life Crisis...sign Of Our Times

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1289659/Quarter-life-crisis-hits-26-30-year-olds.html

For once an interesting and less inflammatory Daily Mail Article. It talks about the dissatisfaction with life felt by many between the ages of 26 and 30.

I am a jfew years beyond that age now, and I do recall some frustrations with house prices etc, though I did by age 26 back in 2000, when prices were about half of what they are now.  I can imagine that for people in that group now things must be very frustrating.

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Engendering feelings of inadequacy is a perfect tool to ensure people keep plugging away. Got to keep the hamster wheel turning.

Edited by Minos

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Looking back at this age group it looks like they have been manipulated to perfection by the media. I know plenty of bright enough people in this age group yet they really seem to conform neatly to a set of predefined roles assigned to them, i.e. even 'alternative' these days is neatly packaged.

They've also been sold some aspirational lifestyle that doesn't really exist, especially not in the UK. Given the power of the media, and the fact that a good many role models are still extolling the virtues of property ownership and investment you have to feel sorry for them.

I spent most of my 20's fighting conformity. Can't say being cynical has made me any happier and my current philosophy is to go with the system, but be aware that nothing is necessarily as it seems

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Looking back at this age group it looks like they have been manipulated to perfection by the media. I know plenty of bright enough people in this age group yet they really seem to conform neatly to a set of predefined roles assigned to them, i.e. even 'alternative' these days is neatly packaged.

They've also been sold some aspirational lifestyle that doesn't really exist, especially not in the UK. Given the power of the media, and the fact that a good many role models are still extolling the virtues of property ownership and investment you have to feel sorry for them.

I spent most of my 20's fighting conformity. Can't say being cynical has made me any happier and my current philosophy is to go with the system, but be aware that nothing is necessarily as it seems

It's hard to go against the herd. Still, today's young can look forward to working into their seventies before that have the opportunity to catch their breath. Of course, by then it won't be too long before they draw their last. They should have the confidence to just say sod it.

Edited by Minos

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1289659/Quarter-life-crisis-hits-26-30-year-olds.html

For once an interesting and less inflammatory Daily Mail Article. It talks about the dissatisfaction with life felt by many between the ages of 26 and 30.

I am a jfew years beyond that age now, and I do recall some frustrations with house prices etc, though I did by age 26 back in 2000, when prices were about half of what they are now.  I can imagine that for people in that group now things must be very frustrating.

As someone right at the end of that age spectrum I certainly agree with the article. I do not have debt (other than a small amount of remaining student debt), nor do I have much in the way of savings either. I live a relatively meagre existence (rent, utilities, travel, food) with very few real "luxuries". My fiancee's biological clock is certainly ticking and we are looking at starting a family in a couple of years time but I am not reckless enough to start a family whilst being financially unsecure.

It's not just the buying price of property in this country, but also the mere rental cost that makes life almost a hand-to-mouth existence (perhaps that's a bit over-dramatic).

I see emigration as the only real solution unless a £50k+ a year job just happens to fall into my lap (the alternative is moving in with one set of our parents which is far from ideal). The older I get the more ambition is sucked out of me and the more cynical I become.

Life's a bitch and then you die. I just hope to get more good days than bad out of the next 40 years (should I live that long - wow, she's a lucky girl).

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As someone right at the end of that age spectrum I certainly agree with the article. I do not have debt (other than a small amount of remaining student debt), nor do I have much in the way of savings either. I live a relatively meagre existence (rent, utilities, travel, food) with very few real "luxuries". My fiancee's biological clock is certainly ticking and we are looking at starting a family in a couple of years time but I am not reckless enough to start a family whilst being financially unsecure.

It's not just the buying price of property in this country, but also the mere rental cost that makes life almost a hand-to-mouth existence (perhaps that's a bit over-dramatic).

I see emigration as the only real solution unless a £50k+ a year job just happens to fall into my lap (the alternative is moving in with one set of our parents which is far from ideal). The older I get the more ambition is sucked out of me and the more cynical I become.

Life's a bitch and then you die. I just hope to get more good days than bad out of the next 40 years (should I live that long - wow, she's a lucky girl).

A soupcon of cynicism helps to inculcate wisdom; all part of the ageing process.

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If I were in your position I would emigrate. I met someone recently very similar to yourself - moving to Australia. Sick of paying a fortune to rent a flat in London with no prospect of ever being in a position to buy. Even a £50k job will not allow you to buy much in London where 350k is a 'starter' home.

It is looking a distinct possibility. I keep hearing anecdotes of cheap rental prices across Europe with the added bonus of non-draconian tenancy laws and my fiancee would love to be closer to her parents (Czech Republic - added bonus of being outside the Eurozone although I'm not sure that makes much difference).

We're both committed to gaining qualifications in the short-term but once they are complete we should hopefully have a few more avenues opening up. I will go where the work is.

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<br />I've been feeling an everywhich way but lose mentality recently.<br />
<br /><br /><br />

A ginger haired one from "Planet of the apes"?

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I am a jfew years beyond that age now, and I do recall some frustrations with house prices etc, though I did by age 26 back in 2000, when prices were about half of what they are now. I can imagine that for people in that group now things must be very frustrating.

I'm not sure what they have to whine about at the moment. If they pulled their heads out of the media sandpit, they'd clearly see facts that align to a correction in the years to come. Just gotta be patient and make some sacrifice in the meantime to stash some cash away. Hardly rocket science. And if HPI does magically reappear, I'll just jump ship - keeping my skills sharp for a reason.

Edited by blackhole

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im 26. Dont have much ambition, which i guess is a mixing blessing, makes me laid back, but probably means i dont push myself either. Some of my mates seem to think they got to do everything before they hit 30. Seems overrated to me. Ronald Reagan wasnt even President until he was knocking on 70. Plenty of time to live life.

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im 26. Dont have much ambition, which i guess is a mixing blessing, makes me laid back, but probably means i dont push myself either. Some of my mates seem to think they got to do everything before they hit 30. Seems overrated to me. Ronald Reagan wasnt even President until he was knocking on 70. Plenty of time to live life.

Yep...Money is very nice, but I can't really be arsed getting into all that material ******, and I'm not really bothered about a career...If I can do something that I really enjoy, and along with that, the money isn't bad, then then that's fair enough, but I'd rather be poor than stuck in a horrible pointless "career" just because you believe that you should be doing, as that's what everyone else is telling you to do....

Edited by zagreb78

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Don't watch or listen to the adverts....if you do, don't buy it and do the complete opposite of what they tell you should be doing or buying. ;)

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Yep...Money is very nice, but I can't really be arsed getting into all that material ******, and I'm not really bothered about a career...If I can do something that I really enjoy, and along with that, the money isn't bad, then then that's fair enough, but I'd rather be poor than stuck in a horrible pointless "career" just because you believe that you should be doing, as that's what everyone else is telling you to do....

Looking at life from the other end (retired) you are very much on the right path. I see so many retired people who have spent their entire life doing something they hated every minute of the day, watching the clock and living for weekends because the money was good and the pension was good. They have mostly spent the money and borrowed some more trying to buy happiness through toys and have failed. They are now spending their pension desperately seeking happiness and failing again. They are mostly rich, lonely and miserable. No doubt they would respond that it is better than poor, lonely and miserable but when you have led a full, rich life with all kinds of memories and a happy outlook you discover that money only buys you things, not happiness and you don't need the things you only need happiness and contentment. Things do not translate into happiness; they are a very temporary fix for a permanent problem. Life style is an all-important phrase. Get that figured out early and your life will be happy. Happiness is the universal goal. Go for the goal and don't get sidetracked by money. Money is an easier goal but ultimately needs to be traded for happiness. Much better to go directly to happiness, a miserable person cannot buy it.

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My fiancee's biological clock is certainly ticking and we are looking at starting a family in a couple of years time but I am not reckless enough to start a family whilst being financially unsecure.

If you wait until you're financially secure to have kids you'll probably die childless.

Just get on with living.

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If you wait until you're financially secure to have kids you'll probably die childless.

Just get on with living.

+1

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If you wait until you're financially secure to have kids you'll probably die childless.

Just get on with living.

That is probably true. She is currently studying for a qualification in childcare. Once she has finished that then we will have our own children and hopefully can combine the two a few years down the line. I would love her to be a stay-at-home-mum but I just can't see it being financially feasible.

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Yep...Money is very nice, but I can't really be arsed getting into all that material ******, and I'm not really bothered about a career...If I can do something that I really enjoy, and along with that, the money isn't bad, then then that's fair enough, but I'd rather be poor than stuck in a horrible pointless "career" just because you believe that you should be doing, as that's what everyone else is telling you to do....

Yep! It's all bo11ocks.

That is probably true. She is currently studying for a qualification in childcare. Once she has finished that then we will have our own children and hopefully can combine the two a few years down the line. I would love her to be a stay-at-home-mum but I just can't see it being financially feasible.

Have you ever thought of living in a bender or shack.

tinkers-bubble.png

Edited by dom

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Have you ever thought of living in a bender or shack.

Yes, but possibly not seriously enough.

I do think about acquiring a plot of land and building a very modest homestead. The type I am thinking of is probably not too dissimilar.

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Same problem in China really - young people can't decide if they should work hard and end up having to be able to afford nothing

or to speculate and hope that it works. So the presitgious Peking University student asked Premier Wen whether he should

aim for the star and the Premier replied that you should put your foot firmly on the ground.

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=zh-CN&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.zaobao.com%2Fspecial%2Fchina%2Fzaodian%2Fpages2%2Fzaodian_zi100626.shtml

Original link: (use google translate to read if the above link doesn't work)

http://www.zaobao.com/special/china/zaodian/pages2/zaodian_zi100626.shtml

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If you wait until you're financially secure to have kids you'll probably die childless.

Just get on with living.

Thats true, but I wonder how that view will sit with the "ppl on benefit" hating mob, whereby they criticize anyone (they claim mainly chavs) who have kids, and can't afford them, and expect the general populace to pay for them...

As for those shacks, are they a bugger to get planning for them?

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Looking at life from the other end (retired) you are very much on the right path. I see so many retired people who have spent their entire life doing something they hated every minute of the day, watching the clock and living for weekends because the money was good and the pension was good. They have mostly spent the money and borrowed some more trying to buy happiness through toys and have failed. They are now spending their pension desperately seeking happiness and failing again. They are mostly rich, lonely and miserable. No doubt they would respond that it is better than poor, lonely and miserable but when you have led a full, rich life with all kinds of memories and a happy outlook you discover that money only buys you things, not happiness and you don't need the things you only need happiness and contentment. Things do not translate into happiness; they are a very temporary fix for a permanent problem. Life style is an all-important phrase. Get that figured out early and your life will be happy. Happiness is the universal goal. Go for the goal and don't get sidetracked by money. Money is an easier goal but ultimately needs to be traded for happiness. Much better to go directly to happiness, a miserable person cannot buy it.

That's interesting, but there is going after money because you want money to fill a void and there is going after money to simply make ends meet. Unless you want to live in a bad neighbourhood you are forced to work at something that makes you miserable. What are these jobs that people have that they enjoy doing and that pay upwards of 50k? You should be able to live on less I hear you say, well you can't. Not unless you want to live in Chav scum central and how happy is that going to make you.

It's not a matter of wanting 'things', it's a matter of needing a place to live that doesn't make you miserable.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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