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Poll: Majority Approves Emergency Budget

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The Times / Populus public opinion poll about the Con-Lib Emergency Budget.

( "random sample of 1,003 adults interviewed by telephone between June 22 and 23." )

Full article: http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/business/budget/article2571142.ece

Full copy:

Public sector has doubts over coalition plan to wipe out the deficit

Francis Elliott Peter Riddell and Roland Watson

Last updated June 24 2010 12:01AM

Public sector workers are markedly less positive about the Government’s plan to wipe out Britain’s deficit than those with jobs in the private sector.

David Cameron and Nick Clegg are writing today to the country’s six million state employees to ask them where the spending axe should fall.

According to a Populus poll for The Times taken between early evening on Tuesday and midday yesterday, while 71 per cent of private sector workers believe the five-year plan will put the economy on a stronger footing, 56 per cent in the public sector agree. While 62 per cent in the private sector believe that the Budget struck the right balance between tax rises and spending cuts, 50 per cent in the public sector do so.

And less than half — 47 per cent — of state employees trust the coalition to make cuts without harming important services. The figure for those employed privately is 62 per cent.

Yesterday the Prime Minister and his deputy appeared on a TV discussion with a studio audience about the Budget. Mr Cameron acknowledged that the two-year pay freeze for public sector workers earning over £21,000 constituted a cut in real terms. “It is tough,” he said. “We have a choice: we have to have pay restraint or we are going to lose jobs.” He also agreed that public sector workers would face pay higher pension contributions as schemes were brought into line with those elsewhere. “For the future, there may be changes to pension arrangements that affect existing employees,” he said.

George Osborne has won early approval for his austerity package, two thirds of all those sampled in the poll believing it will put the economy on a stronger footing. They realise that their own pockets are likely to be hit. There has been little change since early April in the number saying that Britain as a whole will fare well over the next year: at 44 per cent, it is up two points. Yet there has been a sharp fall from 54 to 47 per cent in the number expecting their families to do well over the next year. The number expecting their families to do badly has risen from 41 to 48 per cent.

About three quarters of voters back the freeze in child benefit offset by the rise in child tax credit for the poorest; the pay freeze in the public sector; an increase in capital gains tax; the rise in the income tax threshold; and cuts in tax credit entitlements for families earning £40,000. Nearly two thirds back the commitment to balancing the budget over the next five years with the bulk of resources coming from cuts. But slightly more voters say cuts should not be made until the economic recovery is stronger (53 per cent) than consider the deficit to be so serious that significant cuts must be made now (47 per cent).

Populus interviewed a random sample of 1,003 adults by telephone between June 22 and 23. Interviews were conducted across the country and have been weighted to be representative of all adults. For more details, go to www.populus.co.uk.

Main points:

71 per cent of private sector workers believe the five-year plan will put the economy on a stronger footing,

56 per cent in the public sector agree.

62 per cent in the private sector believe that the Budget struck the right balance between tax rises and spending cuts,

50 per cent in the public sector believe so.

62 per cent of private sector trust the coalition to make cuts without harming important services.

47 state employees trust them to...

Two thirds approve George Osborne austerity package, believing it will put the economy on a stronger footing.

44 per cent saying that Britain as a whole will fare well over the next year

47 per cent in the number expecting their families to do well over the next year.

48 per cent expect their families to do badly over the next year.

Three quarters of voters back:

- freeze in child benefit offset by the rise in child tax credit for the poorest;

- pay freeze in the public sector;

- an increase in capital gains tax;

- the rise in the income tax threshold;

- cuts in tax credit entitlements for families earning £40,000.

Nearly two thirds back commitment to balancing the budget over the next five years with the bulk of resources coming from cuts.

53 per cent say cuts should not be made until the economic recovery is stronger

47 per cent consider the deficit to be so serious that significant cuts must be made now

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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The link is to TimesOnline, which is now (as we know all too well on this forum :)) a paying site.

Hence, a link to it, or quotes from that site, are about as credible as Saddam's Information Minister.

TiredOfWaiting - this not a dig at you, rather a reminder to all that we can no longer accept TimesOnline as a credible source (because the vast majority of readers of this forum cannot verify the source).

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71 per cent of private sector workers believe the five-year plan will put the economy on a stronger footing,

56 per cent in the public sector agree.

Less turkeys than humans voted for christmas.

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The priivate sector agree with the budget. We pay the public sectors wages.

The public sector should have no voice on the matter and take what they are given and be thankfull.

They need to realise they were living in a credit bubble and being paid at everyone elses expense.

They are part of the problem, not the solution.

They are hear to serve, not to take and be spoilt. If there were worth more someone in the private sector would pay them accordingly. They arent, this is why they are public sector employees.

I dont think the cuts went far enough. 10% pay cuts and pension stopped immediately was what I wanted. If they dont like, tell them to get a job elsewhere....welcome to the private sector.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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The link is to TimesOnline, which is now (as we know all too well on this forum :)) a paying site.

Hence, a link to it, or quotes from that site, are about as credible as Saddam's Information Minister.

TiredOfWaiting - this not a dig at you, rather a reminder to all that we can no longer accept TimesOnline as a credible source (because the vast majority of readers of this forum cannot verify the source).

OK. I'll avoid quoting them from now onwards.

Though actually their site is still free. You just have to register. But it is very annoying, I agree. And I am not going to pay them once they start charging.

The article is on today's printed edition as well though. Anyone can check it there. I just copied and pasted the full article "for your convenience". But I'll avoid them in the future.

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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.

Times Populus public opinion poll about the Con-Lib Emergency Budget.

( "random sample of 1,003 adults interviewed by telephone between June 22 and 23." )

Main points:

71 per cent of private sector workers believe the five-year plan will put the economy on a stronger footing,

56 per cent in the public sector agree.

62 per cent in the private sector believe that the Budget struck the right balance between tax rises and spending cuts,

50 per cent in the public sector believe so.

62 per cent of private sector trust the coalition to make cuts without harming important services.

47 state employees trust them to...

Two thirds approve George Osborne austerity package, believing it will put the economy on a stronger footing.

44 per cent saying that Britain as a whole will fare well over the next year

47 per cent in the number expecting their families to do well over the next year.

48 per cent expect their families to do badly over the next year.

Three quarters of voters back:

- freeze in child benefit offset by the rise in child tax credit for the poorest;

- pay freeze in the public sector;

- an increase in capital gains tax;

- the rise in the income tax threshold;

- cuts in tax credit entitlements for families earning £40,000.

Nearly two thirds back commitment to balancing the budget over the next five years with the bulk of resources coming from cuts.

53 per cent say cuts should not be made until the economic recovery is stronger

47 per cent consider the deficit to be so serious that significant cuts must be made now

Full article: http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/business/budget/article2571142.ece

Full copy:

For once the Uk populus agrees with me... it was indeed a good budget.. problem is of course in five years time when hopefully the structural deficit has gone and growth has done for most of the rest we then need to face the fact that public expenditure can only grow more slowly than revenues if we are to actually start paying off one pound of the debt created so far..... sure inflation will do a little work over time but we need to knock the debt down by about half to be in the position we should have been if Labour hadn't messed this all up and that might well mean a further two parliaments of austerity....... then of course ( if not well before) the British sheeple , so sick of austerity will go with the party which breaks cover and starts offering them the biggest party first... and then of course we'll be bcak where we started with a profilgate government destroying the public finances by effectively buying votes to stay in power.... hopefully the current government will at least be able to get enough legislation through to prevent the type of wanton destruction we saw over the last ten years of labour. We just cannot allow a government ever again to be so inept at managing the public finances.

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Less turkeys than humans voted for christmas.

Still, very surprising that the majority of turkeys admit they are part of the problem. Impressive. "Respec".

Looks like the sample we had in this forum, of public sector workers, was not representative after all. :)

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For once the Uk populus agrees with me... it was indeed a good budget.. problem is of course in five years time when hopefully the structural deficit has gone and growth has done for most of the rest we then need to face the fact that public expenditure can only grow more slowly than revenues if we are to actually start paying off one pound of the debt created so far..... sure inflation will do a little work over time but we need to knock the debt down by about half to be in the position we should have been if Labour hadn't messed this all up and that might well mean a further two parliaments of austerity....... then of course ( if not well before) the British sheeple , so sick of austerity will go with the party which breaks cover and starts offering them the biggest party first... and then of course we'll be bcak where we started with a profilgate government destroying the public finances by effectively buying votes to stay in power.... hopefully the current government will at least be able to get enough legislation through to prevent the type of wanton destruction we saw over the last ten years of labour. We just cannot allow a government ever again to be so inept at managing the public finances.

Yes, that is the biggest risk - the return of Labour.

My best hope is that Scotland manages to have their referendum, and get its independence, taking all its Labour MPs with it, out of Westminster.

And that will be very good for Scotland as well, as they will soon learn the need for fiscal responsibility also.

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The priivate sector agree with the budget. We pay the public sectors wages.

Last time I looked, we pay the private sector's wages too. As do those in the public sector. Or do you imagine that Tesco's only sell stuff to people with their own companies ?

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The priivate sector agree with the budget. We pay the public sectors wages.

The public sector should have no voice on the matter and take what they are given and be thankfull.

They need to realise they were living in a credit bubble and being paid at everyone elses expense.

They are part of the problem, not the solution.

They are hear to serve, not to take and be spoilt. If there were worth more someone in the private sector would pay them accordingly. They arent, this is why they are public sector employees.

I dont think the cuts went far enough. 10% pay cuts and pension stopped immediately was what I wanted. If they dont like, tell them to get a job elsewhere....welcome to the private sector.

Yes, I tend to agree with you. Actually I have even argued in the past that only net-tax-payers should have the right to vote. This should exclude all benefits recipients and public sector workers (PSW). But political reality makes this completely impossible, of course.

Anyway, I am still very surprised that the majority of PSW agrees with the budget.

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And yet if you watched only the BBC you'd believe the whole country is comprised solely of higher paid civil servants receiving over £20000 housing benefit a year who own two or more properties and might now pay a massive tenth more on gains if they either havent put it in their partners name, put it in a SIPP or made other arrangements.

Strange.

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Last time I looked, we pay the private sector's wages too. (...)

:blink:

Mal Volio, even the Labour party admits that it is the government that lives on people's money.

In this case, being a contrarian just means that you're wrong. ;)

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Last time I looked, we pay the private sector's wages too. As do those in the public sector. Or do you imagine that Tesco's only sell stuff to people with their own companies ?

It's a religion with some people. There is no reasoning or debate. They seem their friends and family members in these terms (turkeys, parasites, sheeple etc).

I think they must define themselves in terms of their imagined superiority.

Very odd, but there you are (and I've worked 30 years in the private sector).

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:blink:

Mal Volio, even the Labour party admits that it is the government that lives on people's money.

Perhaps you might like to read again what I wrote. I'm not saying that the public sector is not funded by the private, just that everyone is effectively funded by everyone else in the money-go-round.

In this case, being a contrarian just means that you're wrong. ;)

:)

It does at least relieve the tedium

edit:

I have viewing of sigs turned off, and TBH I'd forgotten I still had that

Edited by Mal Volio

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It's a religion with some people. There is no reasoning or debate. They seem their friends and family members in these terms (turkeys, parasites, sheeple etc).

I think they must define themselves in terms of their imagined superiority.

Very odd, but there you are (and I've worked 30 years in the private sector).

:lol: You misunderstood everything Red Karma, again.

I am not saying that (good) public sector workers are not socially useful. The good ones are essential, vital. I am just saying that they are not net-tax-payers. :rolleyes:

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:lol: You misunderstood everything Red Karma, again.

I am not saying that (good) public sector workers are not socially useful. The good ones are essential, vital. I am just saying that they are not net-tax-payers. :rolleyes:

I was replying to Mal Volio. If I was replying to you, I'd quote you. It's that simple.

Perhaps if you feel people misunderstand you, it's a failing in you, not others.

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Yes, I tend to agree with you. Actually I have even argued in the past that only net-tax-payers should have the right to vote. This should exclude all benefits recipients and public sector workers (PSW). But political reality makes this completely impossible, of course.

Anyway, I am still very surprised that the majority of PSW agrees with the budget.

A neat idea, but the implementation could be nightmarish. Plain practicality would suggest something more extreme such "any benefits of any kind, and you can't vote".

Which, incidentally, is a policy that I would vote for - on the basis that the recipients of charity should not be deciding how much charity they receive - but which would have the flight characteristics of a lead balloon.

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I was replying to Mal Volio. If I was replying to you, I'd quote you.

I know. You have been doing this recently - talking about me, but not directly to me.

It's that simple.

I don't "simple" is the best description of it. ;)

Perhaps if you feel people misunderstand you, it's a failing in you, not others.

I didn't write any "people". I wrote you. You are "misunderstanding", again (or is it distorting?).

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A neat idea, but the implementation could be nightmarish.

Of course. Completely impossible. It was just a "conceptual" idea. :D

Plain practicality would suggest something more extreme such "any benefits of any kind, and you can't vote".

Which, incidentally, is a policy that I would vote for - on the basis that the recipients of charity should not be deciding how much charity they receive - but which would have the flight characteristics of a lead balloon.

Yes, for benefits recipients that is exactly the principle: "recipients of charity should not be deciding how much charity they receive". Perfect.

Of course public sector workers do not fall into this category, as they are working for their money. Pensioners are also net receivers at the moment, but many paid plenty of taxes during a long working life.

The problem just before the last election was more practical: suppose all net-tax-receivers (benefits recipients, public sector workers and pensioners) voted for a profligate government (Labour), we would have had a crisis, as the political-economy of it would be unsustainable.

The best news in this Times poll is that public sector workers have a lot of sense, thanks god, and are much more realist and well informed than I feared. They must have calculated correctly that a small (relatively speaking) adjustment now is best in the long term.

My faith in democracy has been restored. :)

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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The link is to TimesOnline, which is now (as we know all too well on this forum smile.gif) a paying site.

Hence, a link to it, or quotes from that site, are about as credible as Saddam's Information Minister.

TiredOfWaiting - this not a dig at you, rather a reminder to all that we can no longer accept TimesOnline as a credible source (because the vast majority of readers of this forum cannot verify the source).

nonsense. Says who ? speak for yourself

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Guest BetterOffOnBenefits

The priivate sector agree with the budget. We pay the public sectors wages.

The public sector should have no voice on the matter and take what they are given and be thankfull.

They need to realise they were living in a credit bubble and being paid at everyone elses expense.

They are part of the problem, not the solution.

They are hear to serve, not to take and be spoilt. If there were worth more someone in the private sector would pay them accordingly. They arent, this is why they are public sector employees.

I dont think the cuts went far enough. 10% pay cuts and pension stopped immediately was what I wanted. If they dont like, tell them to get a job elsewhere....welcome to the private sector.

I'd rather they sack a £60k Diversity coordinator management consultant than shave 10% off the salary of a 15k office worker.

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Nervous twitches of a dead corpse ;)

Probably. If I remember correctly they are planning to (try to) charge £1 a day, or £2/week. I think that's way too much. That is £104/year. That is nuts. If they charged like 5p/day, or 10p/week, I could consider subscribing. But more than that, and I doubt I would.

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  • 150 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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