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That Cameron And Clegg Talk To The People Thing

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Chap who works in FE college in Stourbridge

'I have colleagues who have taken out 35 to 40 year mortgages affordable because of their future pension, will their pension now be effected'

Astounding

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Chap who works in FE college in Stourbridge

'I have colleagues who have taken out 35 to 40 year mortgages affordable because of their future pension, will their pension now be effected'

Astounding

one of the things that impresses me is that the nouveau riche of the public sector seem to have planned quite effectively to squander it. amazing.

Edited by Si1

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Chap who works in FE college in Stourbridge

'I have colleagues who have taken out 35 to 40 year mortgages affordable because of their future pension, will their pension now be effected'

Astounding

Agreed - I gasped aloud at that one. What is wrong with these people?! :S

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What I find depressing, is how some of the so called private sector business people are worried about cuts - surely these should play right into their hands? Less government borrowing/spending => more private sector borrowing/spending. The latter gives us choice, rather than the threat of violence if you don't comply.

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What I find depressing, is how some of the so called private sector business people are worried about cuts - surely these should play right into their hands? Less government borrowing/spending => more private sector borrowing/spending. The latter gives us choice, rather than the threat of violence if you don't comply.

because they are corporatists and they have made money out of government projects, deals, handouts and loopholes.

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one of the things that impresses me is that the nouveaux riche of the public sector seem to have planned quite effectively to squander it. amazing.

Rent tends to extract surplus income.

This is why people are so blindly desperate to achieve a rent free existence.

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Lots of banker bashing going on.....It was the bankers who caused it. Very little criticism of Gordon's massive overspending during the good times between 2001 and 2007.

Liam Byrne now on calling it a 'minor deficit'. What a lying little ****. Look at the Treasury figures for that period.....they added over £200 billion to the national debt between 2001 and 2008.

Labour are desparately rewriting history, and the sheeple seem to be falling for it!

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What I find depressing, is how some of the so called private sector business people are worried about cuts - surely these should play right into their hands? Less government borrowing/spending => more private sector borrowing/spending. The latter gives us choice, rather than the threat of violence if you don't comply.

The government is a huge source of revenue for private industry. My work in Australia is likely to be significantly affected by these cut backs. (It is of course absolutely absurd that I am being paid stonking amounts of UK taxpayer money, so I won't feel hard done by if the source of money dries up.)

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Labour are desparately rewriting history, and the sheeple seem to be falling for it!

Unfortunately (and surprisingly, given the Conservative party has an income of x2 that of liebour) labour still remain the best political

Ive been quite impressed with this apparent transparency and openess by camerclegg compared to the various staged 'encounters' typical of Snot gobblers time in power, however, i dont think the majority of people will see it that way. They prefer to be lied to.

2.5% VAT increase!!!! Criminal, we'd rather our purchasing power is destroyed by hundreds of billions of counterfeited Brown pounds.

Higher paid civil servants pay freeze - Heinous - our above private sector wage increases for the last 10 years must continue.

Liebour has created a frankenstein like monster of the public sector. Im afraid the only solution given union delusions may be taking the public sector private. All of it. Already happening in america.

http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/06/maywood-california-fires-all-employees.html

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Guest sillybear2

Rent tends to extract surplus income.

This is why people are so blindly desperate to achieve a rent free existence.

More like using early retirement and a public pension to construct a BTL empire.

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(...) Less government borrowing/spending => more private sector borrowing/spending. The latter gives us choice, rather than the threat of violence if you don't comply.

Excellent summary! :)

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Unfortunately (and surprisingly, given the Conservative party has an income of x2 that of liebour) labour still remain the best political

Ive been quite impressed with this apparent transparency and openess by camerclegg compared to the various staged 'encounters' typical of Snot gobblers time in power, however, i dont think the majority of people will see it that way. They prefer to be lied to.

2.5% VAT increase!!!! Criminal, we'd rather our purchasing power is destroyed by hundreds of billions of counterfeited Brown pounds.

Higher paid civil servants pay freeze - Heinous - our above private sector wage increases for the last 10 years must continue.

Liebour has created a frankenstein like monster of the public sector. Im afraid the only solution given union delusions may be taking the public sector private. All of it. Already happening in america.

http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2010/06/maywood-california-fires-all-employees.html

Good post.

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Less government borrowing/spending => more private sector borrowing/spending.

Is there going to be more private sector borrowing/spending?

Do the lending institutions have the money to lend to the private sector? I thought rather a lot of the money that was borrowed by the government, companies and individuals during the credit bubble had been magicked out of the air by sleight of hand. Is that possible any more?

If the lending institutions do have any money, will they lend it to the private sector? If so, what are the T&Cs and rates going to be?

How much less tax is anyone going to pay? That would be money available for spending, possibly, provided it isn't used to pay down debt or squirrelled away in case of even worse times.

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Most people spend what they earn. They spend up to (and often over) their income.

Thoughts of being frugal or living quietly and calmly without the latest gadgets or debt have been sneered on.

The idea of not buying that perfect house/sofa/car is just a killer for some people.

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Guest BetterOffOnBenefits

We don't need public sector pay freees

We need to cull all the Diversity Officers and yoghurt knitters

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It was like watching drug addicts being told they wont be given free drugs anymore.

Everyone agrees drugs are bad - but are outraged when they are told their drug of choice isn't going to be handed out gratis anymore.

It is also maddening to hear the constant references to 'bankers' as the cause of the debt. Not even vaguely true.

I'm irritated that Cameron and his posse don't make it more clear. There are two issues, related, but distinct. A massive debt / structural deficit largely fuelled by Labour buying votes and a financial crisis. The latter has exacerbated the first, in fact, in some ways it was useful because it exposed the disgraceful tactics of Labour over the last 13 years.

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Also, can someone clarify something for me.

Am I understanding correctly that the coalition are stating that Labour had 'baked in' £44Billions of spending 'cuts' in to financial projections but had not costed a single penny of it?

So if they are to find, say, £6 Billions cuts, they actually need to find £50 Billions?

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If 10 year mortgages were the norm, the idea of a 25 year mortgage would abhor you.

Sadly, not so long ago in Australia 10 year mortgages were considered the norm, with 8 year mortgages being common.

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It is also maddening to hear the constant references to 'bankers' as the cause of the debt. Not even vaguely true.

Someone needs to stand up and tell these people that if they have unsecured debt more than 1/3 their income, and secured debt more than 4x their income - they themselves are the cause of the problem.

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Not a single person in the room showed any surprise let alone shock that he had 30 - 40 year mortgage.

What other crazy ideals and values are these lecturers putting into young minds?

Why would a mortgage company allow your term to run into your retirement?

Clegg/Cameron can not deny they are aware of these problems now. Will they stop the insanity.

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Not a single person in the room showed any surprise let alone shock that he had 30 - 40 year mortgage.

What other crazy ideals and values are these lecturers putting into young minds?

Why would a mortgage company allow your term to run into your retirement?

Clegg/Cameron can not deny they are aware of these problems now. Will they stop the insanity.

Not true!

Clegg and Cameron both looked like they were thinking: 'WTF ... is this a serious question?' I'm sure they actually wanted to say - 'sir, you have just explained a massive part of the problem, it is utter madness'.

I think a lot of Public sector workers say 'banker' but mean 'private sector'. They literally cannot comprehend the idea that everyone will have to be impacted. They think 'everyone' means 'everyone else'.

Edited by daniel stallion

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Guest sillybear2

It was like watching drug addicts being told they wont be given free drugs anymore.

Everyone agrees drugs are bad - but are outraged when they are told their drug of choice isn't going to be handed out gratis anymore.

It is also maddening to hear the constant references to 'bankers' as the cause of the debt. Not even vaguely true.

I'm irritated that Cameron and his posse don't make it more clear. There are two issues, related, but distinct. A massive debt / structural deficit largely fuelled by Labour buying votes and a financial crisis. The latter has exacerbated the first, in fact, in some ways it was useful because it exposed the disgraceful tactics of Labour over the last 13 years.

That's how they think in their little world :-

Everyone in the private sector = high earning bankers.

Everyone in the public sector = lowly paid saints performing unending miracles on a daily basis.

Neither is true, there's plenty of lowly paid private sector workers performing vital jobs and plenty of useless public servants that could teach the bankers a lesson or two in lazy parasitism. Their answer to a grossly inflated state? Increase taxes in order to "share the pain" then increase their own wages to offset the tax rise.

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How else could the globalisation dream be achieved.

The basic pattern was agreed during the leaders regular meetings on globalisation in the years leading upto the new millennium, year 2000.

Developed world.

Easy mortgages and plenty of lending. 30/40 year mortgages if necessary, liar loans etc etc so that the west had spare equity and borrowing to spend while their jobs were being shipped abroad.

Developing world.

Expansion and industrialisation etc of the developing countries on the back of the lending spending by the developed countries.

If the banks get into difficulty due to excess lending etc then central banks would bail them out using taxpayers money.

Don't expect any honesty or true transparency from any of the political parties under those circumstances and in fact expect only the usual lies after lies and broken promises galore as they help wittingly or unwittingly in the global ambitions.

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Is there going to be more private sector borrowing/spending?

Do the lending institutions have the money to lend to the private sector? I thought rather a lot of the money that was borrowed by the government, companies and individuals during the credit bubble had been magicked out of the air by sleight of hand. Is that possible any more?

If the lending institutions do have any money, will they lend it to the private sector? If so, what are the T&Cs and rates going to be?

How much less tax is anyone going to pay? That would be money available for spending, possibly, provided it isn't used to pay down debt or squirrelled away in case of even worse times.

The private sector is tapped out, which is why the state continued to rack up the debts on our behalf. As they tend to spend it less efficiently, they are doing more harm than good in the pong term.

Remember, the is only one pool of money and credit which can be run up against it. The more the state borrower, the less there is for the private sector. Ofc, the banks prefer lending the state credit, as they have us taxpayers as collateral. It can't go on forever though as we're cannibalising our economy. Imo, this is why the gov borrowing needs drawing in.

Edit: to add, it will be painful, but what choice do we have? We should never have racked up the debt in the first place, then we wouldn't have had to.

Edited by Traktion

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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