Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Mikhail Liebenstein

Savings To Make After The Budget

Recommended Posts

Ok after the budget, I am sure many are feeling stung.

SO here is my first money saving tip, and yes it does work:

----> Buy LED replacements for those Halogen bulbs.

For example at http://litebulbs.co.uk/

I've bought some of the MR16 Exergi bulbs, and I estimate that just 6 of them in one room save me about £200 per year. Ok so they cost me £130 upfront, but they are really are good in terms of light quality and will last for 10 years. I have 5 rooms with spot lights in, and whilst some aren't on as much as other, I am probably saving £500 per year on electricity.

Not bad for starters.

The key fact is that the LEDs I picked are 3.6W versus 50W (or 20W) for a Halogen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. I bought 12 LED bulbs straight from a sweat shop in Shanghai for around £4 each courtesy of Ebay a few weeks ago. The quality of the light is lovely - really high colour temperature and none of the flicker or UV of a mini-flourescent. They are between 3w (equivalent to a 40w traditional filament bulb) to 5w. Even if they didn't get me much of an electricity saving they'd have been worth it for the light quality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup. These state-of-the-art LED lamps are really very impressive. Good quality light, no warm up time, last ages, as efficient as CFLs (possibly even more so) but with a better beam shape.

A far cry from the cheap Chinese tat (which is the usual thing you find in all but the best shops) - with a dozen 'ice white' flickery LEDs crammed into a tiny bulb which burn out after a few months, because the manufacturers were too cheap to add provision for cooling the LEDs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 5 rooms with spot lights in, and whilst some aren't on as much as other, I am probably saving £500 per year on electricity.

Not bad for starters.

The key fact is that the LEDs I picked are 3.6W versus 50W (or 20W) for a Halogen.

My whole electric bill isnt much more than £500 a year, and I have economy 7 heating which I use a lot. If you think you can save £500 on lighting I think you will be very disappointed. I changed to low energy light bulbs years back and saw no drop in my bill at all. I suspect lighting is only 10% of an overall bill.

I had a quick look around google, found this from 2001:-

http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/recs/recs2001/enduse2001/enduse2001.html

Shows lighting to be only 9% of total bill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why don't they make them with normal fittings?

Only good for replacements for directional bulbs / beam style such as halogens used for downlights at the moment. A normal tungsten bulb or compact flourescent emit light in emit light over a much wider angle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My whole electric bill isnt much more than £500 a year,...

I dream of such a bill. Family of 4 adults - Gaming PC going full tilt several hours every day c. 250W - actually gets quite warm in that room with heating off!!

Large LCD TV c. 150W, all evening most days. PS3 sweating to render 3D games on a medium sized LCD for an hour or so most days, c.250W. Scattering of digital radios on a lot of the day c.50W. My 'work' PC on 3 days a week for 6-8hours, c.100W.

Underfloor electric heating in hall set to 18C so off at the mo.

4 x uses of the 2 power showers most days (pump uses electricity, never mind the gas).

Numerous hot drinks.

Electic oven used 3-4 days a week. several kw for maybe 8hrs?

Already on low energy bulbs.

How will these LEDs help again?

Edited by xux42

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Shouldn't this thread be in off-topic?)

I've got a few of these bulbs so I can share my experience:

Got some SES (small edison screw) spotlights. One was cheap rubbish from ebay. One average. The one really good one was expensive (£8). Like CFLs in the early days, they struggle to reach the high outputs, so are best used as replacements for tiny halogens etc...

The good one used something called surface-mount LEDs. High power, very directional.

Generally, the light is somewhat glary, so I've put the bulbs next to CFLs to soften it. I tried one on its own on the staircase and didn't like the light at all.

Too early yet to know if they have a big impact on bills :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Shouldn't this thread be in off-topic?)

I've got a few of these bulbs so I can share my experience:

Got some SES (small edison screw) spotlights. One was cheap rubbish from ebay. One average. The one really good one was expensive (£8). Like CFLs in the early days, they struggle to reach the high outputs, so are best used as replacements for tiny halogens etc...

The good one used something called surface-mount LEDs. High power, very directional.

Generally, the light is somewhat glary, so I've put the bulbs next to CFLs to soften it. I tried one on its own on the staircase and didn't like the light at all.

Too early yet to know if they have a big impact on bills :)

There are so many combinations of number/type of LED's their brightness/colour temperature/arrangement that it will be a question of hit and miss until you find some that really appeals and delivers. No doubt some are well overpriced and some underpriced in relation to each other - the bugger is you just have to buy/try many to find out which is which. Going down the local shop and picking up a 40w tungsten it is not. Much the same (but not the same extent) applies to CFL's, the longevity of a lot of CFL's is balony for a start.

Edited by OnlyMe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are only three manufacturers of "good" LEDs, by which I mean bare LED's at 100 lumens/Watt or better: Cree, Seoul Semiconductor, and Nichia. Of those, at this moment, IMV Cree have the edge. The Cree LEDs are about twice as effective as offerings from Philips, Osram etc.

You can get them from the link below, MR16 about US$10, free shipping. Be careful, some of these LED MR16 lamps are longer than the usual 12V dichroic, and will not fit in your luminaire. Always look for a lumen rating before you buy - halogen bulbs produce about 15 lumens per Watt and "ordinary" 40W bulbs manage about 10 lumens / Watt. A good LED lamp will will do better than 80 lumens per Watt.

LED lamps, like CFLs, carry the ballast in their base. In the CFL's, this gets very hot and shortens the life of the electronics. This is why there are restrictions on what type of luminaires can be used for CFL (usually ignored). The LED's will only work at modest temperatures, heat alters the florescent compounds that produce the white light, so they all have an integral heatsink. However, that only works if there is a way for the heat to escape to free air. If they overheat, the colour temperature rises (becomes more blue), but nevertheless, the electronics are unlikely to fail as quickly as those in CFLs, so the 50,000 hours quoted is a more realistic expectation (it is the time usually required for the efficiency to drop, not the time to failure).

Also be aware of the import limits of £18 (is it still the same?) before you become liable for tax, customs etc.

MR16 360 Lumen 4W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a streetlight outside my living room so have no need for bulbs.

Do away with a TV and listen to a wind-up radio to save on batteries. I close my eyes and visualise what is going on in football games etc.

I only shower when it rains.

No need to buy soap - simply use mint leaves from the garden.

Boil water by using a large magnifying glass on recyclesd glass jars and storing the water in thermal flasks for later use.

Drink cold water when there's no sun.

Heating is unnecessary IMO. Simply wrap up warmer. In winter months you will have so many layers on that movement will be difficult but this is an added bonus as moving around only wastes energy.

Some of you people are rank amateurs quite frankly...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My whole electric bill isnt much more than £500 a year, and I have economy 7 heating which I use a lot. If you think you can save £500 on lighting I think you will be very disappointed. I changed to low energy light bulbs years back and saw no drop in my bill at all. I suspect lighting is only 10% of an overall bill.

I had a quick look around google, found this from 2001:-

http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/recs/recs2001/enduse2001/enduse2001.html

Shows lighting to be only 9% of total bill.

I'd say if energy-efficient lighting is only saving you 9% of your overall electricity bill then you must be running an industrial lathe in your cellar, but I know it really depends on a) how energy efficient the rest of your house is and B) whether you've got shitloads of those 50w halogens those led bulbs are replacements for -

My old kitchen had 4 50w halogens (200W) and the hall had 5 (250W) - putting some 5W cold cathode CFLs (cold cathode are da bomb) in those saved me half a kilowatt of lighting in just two rooms

half a kilowatt (500W) is a lot - my new computer monitor is rated at only 28W, the computer power supply is only 250W (and won't use all of that), the telly is only 80W. With only sporadic use of the washing machine / tumbler / oven, I'd say lighting was somewhere between a third and a half of my bill and i saw a big difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.