Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
lewissheridan

75k Park Home

Recommended Posts

Have a look at this, it's a £75k park home.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-485...pa_n=1&tr_t=buy

That's basically what i can afford to get a mortgage on ? Surely, in materials alone that home isn't woth that amount ? I don't know whether that includes the land, but what a crock of shit that is. It has annoyed me so much i feel like phoning up and putting a £5k offer on the house ? i mean ffs... what the hell is it ? £75k ?

someone wake me up, put me out of my misery, or shoot me in the head, either way it has to be less painful then all this crap. :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think it looks.....Gorgeous. Sheeple need to lower their sights a little.

I'm taking the smeg btw  :D

I've finally realised i expect too much from life, being a young want it now, have it now breed, i need to readjust my expectations. You're right.. what have i been thinking all this time, a park home is too good for me..

:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've finally realised i expect too much from life, being a young want it now, have it now breed, i need to readjust my expectations. You're right.. what have i been thinking all this time, a park home is too good for me..

:rolleyes:

After all, this is your actual "detached park home". For the time being you should be aspiring to a semi-detached park home, maybe a terraced park home or even something in one of those park home high-rises. :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Charlie The Tramp
Over 55's only'.

Aiming for the downsize and cashing in Boomers.

Seriously if I was alone I would go for it. Mrs C doesn`t drive and she likes to be close to Tesco or Sainsburys. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have a look at this, it's a £75k park home.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-485...pa_n=1&tr_t=buy

That's basically what i can afford to get a mortgage on ? Surely, in materials alone that home isn't woth that amount ? I don't know whether that includes the land, but what a crock of shit that is. It has annoyed me so much i feel like phoning up and putting a £5k offer on the house ? i mean ffs... what the hell is it ? £75k ?

someone wake me up, put me out of my misery, or shoot me in the head, either way it has to be less painful then all this crap. :huh:

You want to get yourself a decent one if you are going to live in a shed.

A proper park home or two

When I look at what you can buy in parts of France for 164k - I assume I am living in a lunatic asylum.

Edited by Marina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I'm concerned its b*ll*cks.

Come the glorious revolution we'll give away these places to the over 55's.

They are basically mobile homes. You do not own the land and will probably pay a ground rent. Security of tenure is covered by two Acts, Mobile Homes Act 1983 and Caravan Sites Act 1968. You don't even get a long lease. My parents were thinking about buying one some years back when they were about £25000 - I managed to put them off. Ownership is not really ownership unless you own the land.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest prudence
You want to get yourself a decent one if you are going to live in a shed.

A proper park home or two

When I look at what you can buy in parts of France for 164k - I assume I am living in a lunatic asylum.

The problem is that people have been brainwashed into making sure that they ignore the value of money. The vested interests deliberately get people to focus only on what they will have to pay each month - and it has worked. If a would-be buyer was physically shown what they earned in a year, was then physically shown what they will have to earn to pay for the rubbish they are thinking of buying, it would be a very different story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Charlie The Tramp
They are basically mobile homes. You do not own the land and will probably pay a ground rent. Security of tenure is covered by two Acts, Mobile Homes Act 1983 and Caravan Sites Act 1968. You don't even get a long lease.

A relevant part of the 1983 Act.

How long can a resident keep the mobile home on site?

In most cases, residents have the right to keep their mobile homes on site indefinitely unless either they or the site owner bring their agreements to an end. If the site owner's planning permission for the site or interest in the land are subject to a time limit, the resident's right to be on site is similarly limited. The site owner must tell residents if there is a time limit in the written statement (see Sample written statement under the Mobile Homes Act 1983 - Part I). If, after the beginning of the agreement with the resident, the time limit on the site owner's planning permission or interest in the land is extended, the resident's right to stay on site will also be extended. If there is no time limit of this kind, the resident's agreement can only be brought to an end in one of the ways explained below.

Bringing the agreement to an end

How does a resident bring an agreement to an end?

A resident can bring the agreement with the site owner to an end at any time, provided that he or she gives the site owner at least four weeks' notice in writing.

How does a site owner bring an agreement to an end?

A site owner can only bring the agreement with the resident to an end following an application to court, or to an arbitrator. He or she can apply to court, or to an arbitrator, to bring an agreement to an end on one of three grounds:

that the resident is not living in the mobile home as his or her main residence;

that, because of its age and condition, the mobile home is having a detrimental effect on the amenity of the site, or is likely to have such an effect within the next five years. The site owner will only be able to bring an agreement to an end on this ground - if the court orarbitrator agrees - every five years, starting from the date the agreement began;

that the resident has broken a term of the agreement. The site owner must tell the resident that he or she has broken a term of the agreement and give him or her a reasonable time to put things right before an application can be made on this ground. The court, or arbitrator, can only allow the site owner to bring an agreement to an end on this ground if the court or arbitrator consider it reasonable to do so.

A site owner cannot bring an agreement to an end without first going to court or to an arbitrator.

How can a resident be made to leave?

A resident can only be made to leave the site and remove his or her mobile home if the agreement has been brought to an end (see above) and if the site owner has obtained an eviction order from the court. The site owner should normally be able to apply to the court to bring his or her agreement with the resident to an end and for an eviction order at the same time. An arbitrator cannot grant an order for eviction. If the court allows the site owner to bring an agreement to an end, he or she can do so straight away but the court can suspend an eviction order, on a privately owned site, for up to 12 months at a time. The court cannot suspend an order for eviction on a local authority site. It is a criminal offence for anyone to make a resident leave a mobile home site without a court order, or to try to make him or her leave by threats, violence, withholding services such as water, gas or electricity, or any other sort of harassment. In Scotland, a decree of removing is the equivalent of an eviction order.

What should a resident do if he or she is being harassed or threatened with eviction?

If a resident believes he or she is being harassed or threatened with illegal eviction, he or she should consult a solicitor or contact his or her local authority or Citizens Advice Bureau. Local authorities can start legal proceedings for offences of harassment and illegal eviction3. If physical violence is involved, the resident should contact the police.

Can a resident recover payments he or she has made once the agreement has come to an end?

Yes. A resident can recover any payments made under the agreement which cover a period after the date at which the agreement ended.

If, for example, a resident has paid his or her pitch fees in advance and the agreement is then brought to an end (either by the resident or the site owner), he or she can recover the amount he or she has paid for the period which starts after the ending of the agreement.

Resiting

Can a site owner move a mobile home from one part of the site to another?

Only if a term of the agreement with the resident allows him or her to do so - either permanently or temporarily. If it does, the agreement must also contain the following rules:

the pitch to which the mobile home is moved must be broadly comparable to the pitch on which it was originally stationed;

all the costs and expenses which result from the move must be paid by the site owner. This will include both the costs of the move itself and the costs of reconnecting the mobile home to services such as gas, electricity and water.

If the agreement does not give the site owner the right to alter the position of the mobile home, he or she will only be able to do so if the resident is willing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
After all, this is your actual "detached park home". For the time being you should be aspiring to a semi-detached park home, maybe a terraced park home or even something in one of those park home high-rises.  :blink:

Studio park home for me please.. (isn't that a shed ? :huh: )

btw that park home has been on rightmove for about a year now, i always do my searches for 100k max, why, because that's still above the 3.5 multiple for me. House/flat prices imo are at least 40k inflated. bar that park home which is obviously 100% inflated.

I do not consider park homes as credible homes, and the fact they're on right move is a disgrace, they're holiday mobile homes, and doesn't that imply you can only live there for certain parts of the year ?? shouldn't it be 1-bed flat, 2-bed flat...etc 1 bed- starter home, etc, terraced, semi-detached, detached. Where on earth did park home get into this ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have a look at this, it's a £75k park home.

It'd make a very, very nice home. ...For my dog.

Mind you, he wouldn't find the space to swing a cat in it. :D

Nomadd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fraom Charlie's post

"that, because of its age and condition, the mobile home is having a detrimental effect on the amenity of the site, or is likely to have such an effect within the next five years. The site owner will only be able to bring an agreement to an end on this ground - if the court orarbitrator agrees - every five years, starting from the date the agreement began; "

So basically you are paying 75k for a caravan that may be moved off the site in five years time. Looking at the original post, the mobile home looks quite old to me.

An admin assistant at work bought a caravan on the Yorkshire coast about 7 years ago for £12,000. Last year they paid a company £250 to have it towed off the site to the scrap yard.

Complete and utter waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fraom Charlie's post

"that, because of its age and condition, the mobile home is having a detrimental effect on the amenity of the site, or is likely to have such an effect within the next five years. The site owner will only be able to bring an agreement to an end on this ground - if the court orarbitrator agrees - every five years, starting from the date the agreement began; "

So basically you are paying 75k for a caravan that may be moved off the site in five years time. Looking at the original post, the mobile home looks quite old to me.

An admin assistant at work bought a caravan on the Yorkshire coast about 7 years ago for £12,000. Last year they paid a company £250 to have it towed off the site to the scrap yard.

Complete and utter waste.

After paying ground rent, he probably could have got a Council Sheltered flat for less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Charlie The Tramp
After paying ground rent, he probably could have got a Council Sheltered flat for less.

Yes I must think very carefully about the future, never thought I would need a warden to push the wheelchair around. Is there a grant available for one of those turbo powered old people`s scooters. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes I must think very carefully about the future, never thought I would need a warden to push the wheelchair around. Is there a grant available for one of those turbo powered old people`s scooters.  :D

It will happen to many posters on this site. A sad and lonely end: surrounded by the fruits of their labour - owner occupation of a property riddled with disrepair; lacking the modern touches of the next generation.

Many elderly owner occupiers are without central heating. Can you imagine what you will be without in the future?

From my own experience the most comfortable elderly people are those who occupy social rented housing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Charlie The Tramp
Can you imagine what you will be without in the future?

If we say the next 25 years of survival not much.

My generation are much younger in body and mind in comparison with our parents at the same age, and many of us planned for the future when we were young.

Hopefully we should reap the benefits of our careful management, but at the end of the day none of us know when our card is marked.

Many older people living in houses paid for can release equity in their homes, I find the best and uncomplicated ones are the non repayable mortgages. So there is no reason for them to financially suffer. When I go I could not care less how much the mortgager takes out in interest owing, if I took up this scheme.

Edited by Charlie The Tramp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.