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SarahBell

46M In Savings Easy

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Taxpayers are paying millions of pounds to Britons living abroad who claim

they are too sick to work.

Expats living in countries including Spain, France, Cyprus and Portugal are

claiming incapacity benefits of nearly £46million a year.

Incredibly many of the 10,000 claimants have been receiving the payments for

more than five years without having their cases reviewed.

A loophole allows them to simply send in a doctor's note to keep the money

flooding in.

Figures show almost £46million was paid to 9,660 claimants living abroad

last year with a quarter from Spain alone.

Read more:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1288238/Taxpayers-millions-funding-Britons-abroad-sick-work.html#ixzz0rSibG0Co

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What's the betting all the retired old spongers that read the Mail get so irate about this all these people have to come back to the UK? No doubt they will all want to claim housing benefit when they get "home". :D:D

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When I worked as a GP I used to see people who were living (usually) in Spain and would nip back 4 times a year to get their NHS prescription renewed, have their blood pressure checked etc.

I had to point out to them that they were no longer entitled to routine NHS care now that they were not UK residents (I believe that any EU member is entitled to free emergency care here as we are when visiting other EU countries) and if they would be so good as to confirm that they had the means to pay for this private consultation then we could proceed. It surprised me how many ex-pats seemed to be unaware of this fact... and un-amused by it! B)

(This was a couple of years back, it may have changed.)

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When I worked as a GP I used to see people who were living (usually) in Spain and would nip back 4 times a year to get their NHS prescription renewed, have their blood pressure checked etc.

I had to point out to them that they were no longer entitled to routine NHS care now that they were not UK residents (I believe that any EU member is entitled to free emergency care here as we are when visiting other EU countries) and if they would be so good as to confirm that they had the means to pay for this private consultation then we could proceed. It surprised me how many ex-pats seemed to be unaware of this fact... and un-amused by it! B)

(This was a couple of years back, it may have changed.)

Well I bet that for every GP that insisted on proof of entitlement, there are one hundred that dont bother.

One of the problems that the Tories have to face is the overrunning of the NHS by those who shouldnt be entitled. As far as I can see, there are lax rules in the first place regarding entitlement, and that the enforcement of those rules is barely non existent.

Health care is something that people want, and it costs a huge amount. Given that the NHS provides it free, it is unsurprising that its cost has run out of control. If it isnt controlled, then the government will be forced by the market to only spend what it can tax, and that would mean the NHS having cutbacks that most of us cant believe would ever happen.

The only way to avoid this, is to have proper rules regarding the availability of free health care, and the proper enforcement of those rules.

How about, 1) the NHS is only free to UK citizens living in the country, and cases of dire emergency that crop up from time to time.

2) No one sees a GP unless they can can have their identity linked to a database of 'who is entitled.

Oh yeh, and we need to pull out of the moribund EU anyway, so no entitlements for Johnny Foreigner.

If we could put these rules into place, and enforce them at the point of contact between the NHS and patient, we can keep the NHS affordable for the UK citizens who actually pay for it. Instead we have an open door for anyone with enough guile and determination to get here and take advantage of the UK taxpayer. If we cantclose that door, then sooner or later, the NHS wont be treating anybody.

Edited by leicestersq

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2) No one sees a GP unless they can can have their identity linked to a database of 'who is entitled.

Flipping 'eck the reception nazis have enough on their plate now. Does yours grill you why you want to see the doctor?

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Flipping 'eck the reception nazis have enough on their plate now. Does yours grill you why you want to see the doctor?

The problem is one of economics.

If it is free, you are going to get infinite demand. But it isnt free, someone has to pay the bill. So how do you allocate the scarce resources available?

So far we have muddled through, via throwing more money at it, and having the receptionists making it difficult for you to see the doctors etc. But we do get increasing numbers of people from other countries taking their opportunity for a bit of free care. That trickle becomes a stream becomes a river and then an ocean.

If you cant limit how much is spent on the NHS, then it is going to bust whoever is foolish enough to stand behind it. Those fools are the UK taxpayers.

It may not be pleasant, turning people who need care, away. But sooner or later the reality of economics will have to come into play. We have a deficit of £150 billion dont you know, and that wont be sorted unless the NHS plays it's part in cutting expenditure.

And limiting the availability of treatment will be a key to reducing that spend. If you dont reduce it at the front desk, then availability will be reduced elsewhere, with increased waiting lists, less medicine, etc.

And if the NHS costs are not reduced, then you can guarantee the state's ability to borrow will end. Spending will then match expenditure, and the pain of reduced NHS availability of care will be a magnitude higher than if we had sorted out the problem now.

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  • 145 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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