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The Masked Tulip

Job Cuts Fear For Thousands Of Public Sector Workers In Swansea

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http://www.thisissouthwales.co.uk/news/City-public-sector-staff-cuts-fear/article-2327382-detail/article.html

THOUSANDS of public sector workers in Swansea will find out tomorrow where their future lies after the first budget from the coalition Government.

Talk of £6 billion worth of cuts has dominated the headlines since the Tory- Liberal Democrat Government was created last month.

Chancellor George Osborne's emergency budget will tackle tax changes, benefits and tax credits, pensions, motoring and transport and alcohol and tobacco.

Ian Price, assistant regional director of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), said it would be one of the most interesting budgets for a number of years.

He said: "It is going to impact everybody. Nobody will escape. The indications are there are going to be some serious cuts that will impact on the public sector.

"It's not clear where that will be, but we will see some departments disappear and some merge."

Mr Price said public sector workers may be preparing for the worst, but could be pleasantly surprised by the outcome of the budget.

However, the CBI chief also said job losses in the public sector could also be a serious concern for the local economy as a whole in Swansea.

He said: "As well as working there, they spend most of their money in the local economy.

"The nervousness of those people will also impact, as they will reel in their spending, which is somewhat concerning."

"It's particularly important for confidence purposes with the rest of Europe and the World Bank."

Richard Croydon, South Wales director for investment house Brewin Dolphin, said the Government's proposed changes to capital gains tax would have a devastating impact on savers and buy- to-let investors.

He said: "The coalition's plans are light on detail, and this lack of information has caused many savers and landlords sleepless nights.

"We have been receiving calls from concerned clients who are unsure whether to act ahead of the emergency budget.

"We would stress to everyone worrying about capital gains tax to seek independent financial advice before taking any action." Mike Hayden, head of Swansea and West Wales for Barclays Corporate, said businesses would be looking for stability and confidence in the future prosperity of the UK economy from the emergency budget.

For over a year I have been thinking that my true worry should be about where my future income will be rather than buying a house.

40,000 PS jobs in a population of about 190,000 - go figure. Cardiff is not much better.

Edited by The Masked Tulip

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then add on the claimant count,possibly more communist than cuba.

edit to add,not having a go,jsut pointing out that the 40,000 doesn't include those receiving welfare payments.

Fair point. I suspect, even now, there is just huge denial about all of this happening.

Tomorrow might be the day we find out. I suspect the major cuts will be announced week by week over the next 6 months though.

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......

For over a year I have been thinking that my true worry should be about where my future income will be rather than buying a house.

....

Sounds more like it to me. Cold hard reality will not be welcome to the majority of people. The FT survey said 40% of the UK thinks the cuts will not affect them.

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As my polish cousins have pointed out - more communist than Poland BEFORE the Berlin Wall collapsed, in terms of the size of the public sector.

Edited by gruffydd

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Sounds more like it to me. Cold hard reality will not be welcome to the majority of people. The FT survey said 40% of the UK thinks the cuts will not affect them.

There are so many dorks around. I recall a couple of managers in a company I work for asserting that the recession hadn't really had an impact on anyone. They have both since been made redundant.

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As my polish cousins have pointed out - more communist than Poland BEFORE the Berlin Wall collapsed, in terms of the size of the public sector.

I honestly cannot see how Wales can be turned around - the mindset, the mentality is not there.

A few years ago I returned from working in Silicon Valley and did some contracting in the one of the Welsh utilities that had been privatised - one of the most stressful jobs I have even done and no doubt contributed to my bad health later... but the mindset was just numbing and the higher you went in the organisation the stupider and more ignorant people got IMPO.

The brightest boy was one of the hardest working, hardest put upon - typical Welsh chap who a 1,000 years ago would have been a warrior bard/poet - who could see how inept everything was and that they needed real help from people with real business acumen... but that such people were a threat to the apparatiks.

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I honestly cannot see how Wales can be turned around - the mindset, the mentality is not there.

A few years ago I returned from working in Silicon Valley and did some contracting in the one of the Welsh utilities that had been privatised - one of the most stressful jobs I have even done and no doubt contributed to my bad health later... but the mindset was just numbing and the higher you went in the organisation the stupider and more ignorant people got IMPO.

The brightest boy was one of the hardest working, hardest put upon - typical Welsh chap who a 1,000 years ago would have been a warrior bard/poet - who could see how inept everything was and that they needed real help from people with real business acumen... but that such people were a threat to the apparatiks.

I totally agree - you'll often find the most oleaginous of rugger buggers at the top of the pile on this side of the dyke. I've just about given up on this place. There's also a strong culture of bullying here - I see it every day. Working in these places is never worth the money - I get out immediately whenever I find a toxic work culture, which is something I encounter over and over again, especially in rugger bugger land (a large segment of S Wales).

That kinda stuff doesn't do anyone any good mentally or physically - get out while you can!

Edited by gruffydd

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I totally agree - you'll often find the most oleaginous of rugger buggers at the top of the pile on this side of the dyke. I've just about given up on this place. There's also a strong culture of bullying here - I see it every day. Working in these places is never worth the money - I get out immediately whenever I find a toxic work culture, which is something I encounter over and over again, especially in rugger bugger land (a large segment of S Wales).

That kinda stuff doesn't do anyone any good mentally or physically - get out while you can!

This is very interesting. For many years, the whole of the South Wales police Force was skewed by a rugby culture that came first before policing. It was led from the top down, so of course, promotions etc. depended upon how enthusiastic you were about rugby.

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I totally agree - you'll often find the most oleaginous of rugger buggers at the top of the pile on this side of the dyke. I've just about given up on this place. There's also a strong culture of bullying here - I see it every day. Working in these places is never worth the money - I get out immediately whenever I find a toxic work culture, which is something I encounter over and over again, especially in rugger bugger land (a large segment of S Wales).

That kinda stuff doesn't do anyone any good mentally or physically - get out while you can!

something similar existed in the mortgage banks - now mostly nationalised - in Yorkshire - a big Rugby Union thread

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Fair point. I suspect, even now, there is just huge denial about all of this happening.

Tomorrow might be the day we find out. I suspect the major cuts will be announced week by week over the next 6 months though.

You probably won't get the major cuts announced tomorrow, only the tax hikes/falls.

Major cuts perhaps not until the Spending Review is concluded. New Labour didn't bother with a major spending review last year.:blink:

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You probably won't get the major cuts announced tomorrow, only the tax hikes/falls.

Major cuts perhaps not until the Spending Review is concluded. New Labour didn't bother with a major spending review last year.:blink:

Well that will be a bit of an anti climax.

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  • 142 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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