Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
danl

Gold - 0.917 Coins Or 0.999 Coins ?

Recommended Posts

Hi, im looking to buy some gold coins within the next few weeks and i have decided to buy coins instead of the bars. Im gold as an investment and ive noticed that some of the gold coins like the Britannia's and the US Eagles are 0.917 finenes whereas the Philharmoniker and Maples are 0.999. im confused as to which one i should go for. Any advice ? As i live in the UK the Britannia's seem like a good investment choice as there is no CGT when i come to sell (mabey 3-5 years time), whereas the other coins are not CGT exempt. But since th Britannia's are 0.917, would it be harder to sell these then the 0.999 coins ?

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, im looking to buy some gold coins within the next few weeks and i have decided to buy coins instead of the bars. Im gold as an investment and ive noticed that some of the gold coins like the Britannia's and the US Eagles are 0.917 finenes whereas the Philharmoniker and Maples are 0.999. im confused as to which one i should go for. Any advice ? As i live in the UK the Britannia's seem like a good investment choice as there is no CGT when i come to sell (mabey 3-5 years time), whereas the other coins are not CGT exempt. But since th Britannia's are 0.917, would it be harder to sell these then the 0.999 coins ?

Dan

Have you thought about sovereigns ? These are also 0.917 and CGT exempt. I don't think that not being 'pure' gold makes much of a difference in desirability - the alloying has been done to make the coins more robust. Although I haven't bought gold for over a year I always found sovs easier to obtain than Britannias. As far as I know the most widely recognised (and therefore liquid) coins are sovs (CGT exempt) and kruggerrands (not CGT exempt) if that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go for sovereigns and half-sovereigns. For pure investment purposes avoid the proof coins and buy bullion coins instead. If you source non-proof Britannias and fractional Britannias get them too.

Oh, and enjoy yourself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
whereas the Philharmoniker and Maples are 0.999

Not sure about Philharmonikers but Maples, because they're so pure, are supposed to be softer than other coins.

I wouldn't worry about it too much TBH. Britannias and sovereigns should be easier to sell in theory as they are more widely known in this country, especially sovs, but ultimately the only thing that will make a difference to you is the CGT exempt status..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure about Philharmonikers but Maples, because they're so pure, are supposed to be softer than other coins.

I wouldn't worry about it too much TBH. Britannias and sovereigns should be easier to sell in theory as they are more widely known in this country, especially sovs, but ultimately the only thing that will make a difference to you is the CGT exempt status..

thanks for the reply guys ... ive decided to buy Gold Britannia's. Has anyone used 'coinivestdirect' to buy gold coins ... are they any good, reputable etc. Ive never heard of them before untill i found this forum .... the gold they sell isnt fake or anything ?

Also does anyone know why the 2010 coins tend to be slightly cheaper the previous years like the 2008 2009. E.g Silver 1oz Britannia 2010 is £20.90 whereas the 2008 is £21.21 ?

Dan

Edited by danl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone used 'coinivestdirect' to buy gold coins ... are they any good, reputable etc.

You'll find a lot of people on here speak highly of Coinivestdirect. I bought my first gold coins from them. Very easy to use.

If you've got internet banking and can make a "bill payment", that's the best way to pay Coinivestdirect IMO. They send you their bank details when you place your order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll find a lot of people on here speak highly of Coinivestdirect. I bought my first gold coins from them. Very easy to use.

If you've got internet banking and can make a "bill payment", that's the best way to pay Coinivestdirect IMO. They send you their bank details when you place your order.

thanks for the reply. I think i will go with coininvest. I just wanted to you a question about buying silver as you seem to buy a lot (read previous posts of yours). I was thinking about getting the 1oz silver 2010 britannia coins ... again as they are excepmt from CGT. But these, like the gold are not .999, they are .958 (rest is copper). Since silver has many industrial uses, would you think that i would be better off getting the .999 bars and coins ?. if silver sky rockets do you think selling the .958 coins would be harder to sell then the .999 coins and bars ? Whats your opinion on this ?

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about getting the 1oz silver 2010 britannia coins ... again as they are excepmt from CGT. But these, like the gold are not .999, they are .958 (rest is copper).

Interesting. I'd never really thought about silver Britannias and CGT, but I guess it makes sense.

I've not bought any Britannias because they generally cost more than other 1 oz coins or rounds (the same is true for Pandas). While I don't always buy the cheapest silver, I prefer not to spend more than I have to.

I don't think the purity will be much of an issue. Canadian Maples are .9999 fine yet cost the same as Silver Eagles on Sarnia.

If you're avoiding CGT with gold you can perhaps be a bit more lax with silver. You will have a CGT allowance of £10,100 which is purely based on your profit when selling (as I understand it). Unless you're buying huge amounts of silver or the price skyrockets, this should be sufficient for you at the moment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also does anyone know why the 2010 coins tend to be slightly cheaper the previous years like the 2008 2009. E.g Silver 1oz Britannia 2010 is £20.90 whereas the 2008 is £21.21 ?

Dan

I think the Brittanias are intended to be of more interest to numismatic collectors rather than bullion investors/speculators. Maybe that's why the older coins have acquired a slight premium or maybe it's just a quirk of the current supply levels at CID? Some modern numismatics appear to be a waste of time as investments e.g. Weighton Wonders were recently offering proof half gold brittanias at a similar premium to bullion.

I own some silver Brittanias but now look upon them as a bad buy. I'd rather have straightforward silver bars in future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Brittanias are intended to be of more interest to numismatic collectors rather than bullion investors/speculators. Maybe that's why the older coins have acquired a slight premium or maybe it's just a quirk of the current supply levels at CID? Some modern numismatics appear to be a waste of time as investments e.g. Weighton Wonders were recently offering proof half gold brittanias at a similar premium to bullion.

I own some silver Brittanias but now look upon them as a bad buy. I'd rather have straightforward silver bars in future.

yeah i just saw a video about silver and the guy was saying that .999 silver is what industry requires. He also said that 90% silver would need to be melted back and made into pure silver and that if prices went up really high most dealers would not offer you the full price if your selling at the peak of the market - 40 - 50 % of spot is more likley. Anyway do you think the Britannia's are considered 90% silver since they are .958 not .999?

Also what do you think about the Britannia gold coins. Since this is not required by industry do you think the Britannia's which are .917 would have trouble selling compared to the .999 ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah i just saw a video about silver and the guy was saying that .999 silver is what industry requires. He also said that 90% silver would need to be melted back and made into pure silver and that if prices went up really high most dealers would not offer you the full price if your selling at the peak of the market - 40 - 50 % of spot is more likley. Anyway do you think the Britannia's are considered 90% silver since they are .958 not .999?

Also what do you think about the Britannia gold coins. Since this is not required by industry do you think the Britannia's which are .917 would have trouble selling compared to the .999 ?

I'm not sure what you mean about Brittania silver being considered 90%; the coin is composed of 95.8% silver metal.

I wouldn't have any concerns about buying Brittania gold coins if you are looking to buy an ounce of gold in the UK. Most gold coins are alloys (not pure) to improve their resistance to wear and tear. The only drawback I can see to a Brittania is limited international recognition. Kruggerands are surely the way to go if you want to sell abroad. Personally, I prefer sovereigns but would consider Brittanias if the dealers markup on the gold was lower than sovereigns because Sovereigns and Brittanias are currently exempt from CGT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure what you mean about Brittania silver being considered 90%; the coin is composed of 95.8% silver metal.

I wouldn't have any concerns about buying Brittania gold coins if you are looking to buy an ounce of gold in the UK. Most gold coins are alloys (not pure) to improve their resistance to wear and tear. The only drawback I can see to a Brittania is limited international recognition. Kruggerands are surely the way to go if you want to sell abroad. Personally, I prefer sovereigns but would consider Brittanias if the dealers markup on the gold was lower than sovereigns because Sovereigns and Brittanias are currently exempt from CGT.

thanks for the reply

Which of the following SILVER coins to think are the most internationally known :

US Eagle

Canadian Maple

Austrian Philharmonic

Personally i think the Philharmonic's are the most well known. Especially throughout Europe and England.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own some silver Brittanias but now look upon them as a bad buy. I'd rather have straightforward silver bars in future.

You fance doing some swaps?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You fance doing some swaps?

Thanks but no thanks. My intention is to wait and see if I can sell them at a profit in the future. Swapping for bars now would simply guarantee a loss on the numismatic premium I paid for the coins relative to bars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the reply

Which of the following SILVER coins to think are the most internationally known :

US Eagle

Canadian Maple

Austrian Philharmonic

Personally i think the Philharmonic's are the most well known. Especially throughout Europe and England.

An American would say ASE's, but I don't know anyone personally here in the UK who knows anything about silver coins.

There are so many theories as to which coin or indeed coins v. bullion bars that I have come to the conclusion that I should get as much variety as possible.

In silver I have quite a few each of ASE's, Maples and Philharmonics, a Mexican Libertad, an Australian Kookaburra, a Guernsey 8 Doubles, many silver rounds and bars, and a fair bit of old UK, US, Canadian and other commonwealth silver coins. It's starting to weigh a lot. My gold, however, will fit in a matchbox.

This summer I will be getting some 10oz silver bars in the USA, which will also spoil the line of my trousers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An American would say ASE's, but I don't know anyone personally here in the UK who knows anything about silver coins.

There are so many theories as to which coin or indeed coins v. bullion bars that I have come to the conclusion that I should get as much variety as possible.

In silver I have quite a few each of ASE's, Maples and Philharmonics, a Mexican Libertad, an Australian Kookaburra, a Guernsey 8 Doubles, many silver rounds and bars, and a fair bit of old UK, US, Canadian and other commonwealth silver coins. It's starting to weigh a lot. My gold, however, will fit in a matchbox.

This summer I will be getting some 10oz silver bars in the USA, which will also spoil the line of my trousers.

Yeah i think i just going to get a variety of coins and bars but more Eagles and Philharmonics then Maples.

What type of Gold do you have ... coins or bars.?

I am thinking about getting some Britannia gold coins since they are excempt from capital gains tax .. even though they are not as pure as the gold maples and philharmonics. Only problem is the Britannia are not well known outside of the UK so it may be harder to sell when/if prices do go up quite high

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah i think i just going to get a variety of coins and bars but more Eagles and Philharmonics then Maples.

What type of Gold do you have ... coins or bars.?

I am thinking about getting some Britannia gold coins since they are excempt from capital gains tax .. even though they are not as pure as the gold maples and philharmonics. Only problem is the Britannia are not well known outside of the UK so it may be harder to sell when/if prices do go up quite high

I am of relatively modest means, so I've nothing bigger than a Sovereign. I would perhaps recommend these - they are well known internationally and also don't attract cgt. Not that that affects me. I've not been let down by ebay yet - I have a set of scales that weighs to 100ths of a gram.

I have several sovereigns, as many half sovereigns, and a few tiny foreign coins. By value I have just more gold than silver, but by weight I have loads more silver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.