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lowrentyieldmakessense(honest!)

Against School

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whilst we are well on the way to killing the central banks

lets kill the schools as well - you know those institutions that discourage thinking

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We have been taught (that is, schooled) in this country to think of "success" as synonymous with, or at least dependent upon, "schooling," but historically that isn't true in either an intellectual or a financial sense. And plenty of people throughout the world today find a way to educate themselves without resorting to a system of compulsory secondary schools that all too often resemble prisons. Why, then, do Americans confuse education with just such a system? What exactly is the purpose of our public schools?

Mass schooling of a compulsory nature really got its teeth into the United States between 1905 and 1915, though it was conceived of much earlier and pushed for throughout most of the nineteenth century. The reason given for this enormous upheaval of family life and cultural traditions was, roughly speaking, threefold:

1) To make good people. 2) To make good citizens. 3) To make each person his or her personal best. These goals are still trotted out today on a regular basis, and most of us accept them in one form or another as a decent definition of public education's mission, however short schools actually fall in achieving them. But we are dead wrong. Compounding our error is the fact that the national literature holds numerous and surprisingly consistent statements of compulsory schooling's true purpose. We have, for example, the great H. L. Mencken, who wrote in The American Mercury for April 1924 that the aim of public education is not

to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence. ... Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim ... is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States... and that is its aim everywhere else.

Because of Mencken's reputation as a satirist, we might be tempted to dismiss this passage as a bit of hyperbolic sarcasm. His article, however, goes on to trace the template for our own educational system back to the now vanished, though never to be forgotten, military state of Prussia. And although he was certainly aware of the irony that we had recently been at war with Germany, the heir to Prussian thought and culture, Mencken was being perfectly serious here. Our educational system really is Prussian in origin, and that really is cause for concern.

lots of crazy ideas came out of Germany - some truths came from one of their neighbours though

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I kind of think all primary schools should only teach is the "3 r's" After that kids should choose what to study, but all this religious educashun and history BS at early ages when kids can barely speak english or add up is kind of missing the point of education.

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School if fine, just as long as the syllabus has not been tainted overtly by the state, but instead led by the peerage of recognized academics.

No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

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No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

hestongalleyslaves.jpg

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No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

Business an the economy exist for people, not the other way around.

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No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

I FIND some of your postings very disturbing....and i do believe you think the above is ok.....there are people like you in government and that is very disturbing....

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No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

I understand what you are saying and I think superficially would agree. I think that the idea of school and the reason for society funding of an education system is that is produces value adding citizens, thus in theory schools should be producing citizens that add maximum value and it may appear that the business environment would be the place to look to understand what value is most desired.

However, with more than a couple of seconds of analysis, it becomes obvious we are trained (at school) to think just like that. Business people would be the least best placed to decide what 'value' means. 'The city' or 'the market' would aim to produce drones. Unthinking drones. Short term profit maximising, unthinking, compliant drones.

Furthermore, you don't honestly believe that the current curriculum doesn't have the oil stained finger prints of big business all over it anyway do you?

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No, the people who should dictate the syllabus are not acedemics. They have little grasp of the real world. The syllabus should be driven by business and the skills that are actually needed in the real world.

Hey, note that I wrote "recognized academics", ie the ones who actually know what is going on and are likely to be in elevated positions within society. The education is completely tainted by state enforced shenanigans, written into legislation by medium to low IQ politicians and bureaucrats.

You could probably cut out about 75% of the 'education' that young people receive today, as it is irrelevant to anything in your 'real world'.

Yes, skills for business are a necessity, but these can be learned on the job, and should be.

What is required is proper base, which we sadly do not have any more.

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Yes. Gatto's always coming up on these forums. Underground History of American Education is a nod-your-head-in-agreement fest.

yes indeed

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School should be very much divorced from what businesses want. Schools should (not for a moment saying they do) give a good enough grasp of principles so that anyone leaving school and starting work can pick up on the skills needed by whatever business they end up in fairly quickly. A kid who's been messing around on computers a lot isn't going to have any trouble with any software he or she may have to use even without any training in it. A kid who has been doing a fair bit of maths will be able to apply that to the specifics of something financial without ever having been taught anything that specific. Both of those kids will have general skills that they can adapt to many situations, and that's true with just about all proper basic education.

Schools need to go beyond the 3 Rs. I don't believe that you can accurately specialise in anything without having a little bit of experience of everything.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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