Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Policy Exchange Wrong On Public Sector Pay


Recommended Posts

but the whole puropes of the public sector is to ensure that the wealth generating private sector is healthy and capable of work.

if either of these two sectors are out of balance(which they presently are by some considerable margin),then the whole house of cards falls down.

what we have now is a very small heavily taxed and regulated portion of the workforce attempting to support people who quite frankly should not be supported.

...and supporting not just the waifs and strays from their own country,but every tom,dick and harry from elsewhere on the globe who sees the benefits system over here as a free ride.WE paid for it with our toil.

Your main point is good, however the evidence is that we actually have low taxes compared to similar, more successful economies.

The problem is too much reward for capital, not enough for labour. Economic problems are inevitable given this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh look.

The private-sector, Daily Mail-believing, bile-spewing nutters have come out to play.

They're just not as high in number as in the other thread. :rolleyes:

They're just as incompetent and stupid though and can't understand why they don't earn 60 grand a year working at McDonalds :D:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To receive 50% of average (not final) salary after 40 years, you (and your employer, between you) should be contributing about 31%. The difference between your actual 18% in that is magic growth, which (in the absence of real growth, which we've choked) is your pension black hole.

But still, for the average Brit, what you've actually paid for (29% of your average pay), augmented by the basic pension and benefits package, should still leave you quite a lot better-off in retirement than when paying tax, mortgage, and all the costs of working.

I see your private-sector figures are about half your public-sector ones. But does that include those who make no pension contributions, or whose pension is entirely independent of their employer?

Isn't there a rule of thumb that you divide your age when you start your pension by 2 and this is the percentage you need to contribute to give half your salary as a pension at age 65

e.g. if you start a pension at 30 there needs to be a 15% contribution in total

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest absolutezero

Throughout the boom years I'm sure the stats on wage growth consistently showed the private sector almost double the public sector, typically private sector 5% pa, public sector 3% pa

They deny this.

In 2005/2006/2007 I remember the polls about "what's your pay rise?"

I always put in the 2 to 3 percent I got.

I also remember the 8 percent that it averaged out at.

Annoying that the archive doesn't go back that far.

Now things have turned sour they want everyone else to suffer.

That's the reality of the private sector.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They deny this.

In 2005/2006/2007 I remember the polls about "what's your pay rise?"

I always put in the 2 to 3 percent I got.

I also remember the 8 percent that it averaged out at.

Annoying that the archive doesn't go back that far.

Now things have turned sour they want everyone else to suffer.

That's the reality of the private sector.

heh, it's true isn't it. Quite happy to gloat over the bonuses, super share-index linked private pensions, company car, credit card for expenses, and the paid-up free christmas bashes etc when times are good. But when times are bad, aaargh, you feather-bedded public sector drones don't understand the harsh reality... arf

(and if any privateers out there are saying "i didn't get any bonuses, car etc uff uff uff", then what exactly where you doing??? what was the point of being in the private sector)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with what you are both saying but it doesn't change the fact that there is no money left.

Would you prefer a 10% pay cut or 10% of public sector jobs to go? I think we should let you vote.

I disagree with the leeches, but it doesn't change the fact that there is no money left.

What is about to happen is inevitable and overdue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the public sector need to feel the pain like everyone else. and they are just about to do just that.

and lets be honest here it realy is about time they did so. Its amazing they all think we in the private sector are all running around in company cars with expense accounts, that will be about 1 manager to 30 wage slaves in the private sector doing that, while in the public sector that figure will be more like 1 in 3.

The public sector management structure needs a radical severe overhall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the public sector need to feel the pain like everyone else. and they are just about to do just that.

and lets be honest here it realy is about time they did so. Its amazing they all think we in the private sector are all running around in company cars with expense accounts, that will be about 1 manager to 30 wage slaves in the private sector doing that, while in the public sector that figure will be more like 1 in 3.

The public sector management structure needs a radical severe overhall.

I'd rather the bankers and CEOs feel the pain first, thanks very much. As it is, a large part of the reason we need to make cuts at all is because we bailed these overpaid failures out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd rather the bankers and CEOs feel the pain first, thanks very much. As it is, a large part of the reason we need to make cuts at all is because we bailed these overpaid failures out.

It amazes me that we have a forum full of savvy people who fully understand the banking system, fractional reserve lending and the corporate-political takeover of the western world but rather than wanting this to be sorted out they come out salivating over public sector carnage every time the Mail/Telegraph blow the dog whistle.....

Edited by Timak
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jack is correct, it's this kind of cretinous logic that has allowed the public sector to bloat into a dead pig.

From the start I have found it unpleasant that the likes of Britain has used tabloid terms to brand the euro-med countries as 'PIGS', what an irony! You didn't need to have the genius of George Orwell to know that the Labor Dream would turn Britain into Animal Farm. Under Brown, little Napoleon and his pigs were running the mad house farm.

The big issues of our day are:

1. Bloated government - a pig that feeds off taxes on the private sector (and don't make the mistake of arguing the Public sector also pays taxes - those 'taxes' are paid for entirely by the private sector)

2. Bloated pigs that run our too-big-to-fail financial institutions.

Britons, you have dark days ahead. Middle Britains in the Private Sector should be close to rioting in the streets - only that way will you stop the grand theft of private sector wealth.

It's time for equalization, which means EVERY public sector worker takes a minimum of a 15%% paycut - with high earners getting up to 50% paycuts. Pension rules should also change so that nobody takes a pension before the age of 67 (that goes for the private sector too - especially corporations which steal the public blind to bloat executive pay, perks and pensions!)

Most of us saw this coming, but none of us know the end-game. I am starting to think the USA should become highly protectionist and push its losses onto the rest of the world, that way there will be something left standing when its time for recovery under a new set of rules determined by the USAs Manifest Destiny.

  • Step one will be to strengthen the dollar and sell of bad assets to the EU and Asia - that way we can ensure the world gets flu when we catch the cold
  • Step two: print massive amounts of money to support house prices- we'll call it QE, in honor of Queen (no not Freddie Mercury), then allow a state run company to buy all americans mortgages from the banks who issued the loans. Do this during a period of deflation to disguise the inflation.
  • Step three: sell the world 'export compliant' F35s with inferior stealth and exhorbitant maintenance costs - the neat part will be to deny export customers access to the flight and weapons integration software so that we can disguise the in-built off switch which will prevent aggression against the USA, or whomsoever we choose should win any wars
  • Step four: attract huge foreign investment to maintain the USAs weak economy during the deflationary period. This should bolster US stocks and prevent further erosion of American wealth.
  • Step five: when the time is right, and the traps are set, devalue the dollar by 50% under the disguise of a treasury bond market crisis, this will offset the cost of servicing existing US debts - at every one elses expense. The right timing of course is the point when the recovery has started and borrowing has fallen
  • Step six: remind our bretheren of their manifest destiny (ideally, make them feel like they should honor the flag by demonizing and bankrupting a large foreign corporation)

You will of course all know how the special relationship should work in practice -

I am often called angry - but that misses the point - I love the irony!

Bend over middle aged britain you dont have the guts to fight back.

You paid in Jack sh1t. Your "Employer" took the 18.3% pension contribution off somebody in the private sector under threat of imprisonment if they didn't pony up. If your "Employer" didn't steal so much off them, people in the private sector would be able to make better provision for their own retirement.

Edited by bpw
Link to comment
Share on other sites

both need cutting, one more than the other maybe but that's yadda yadda.

until jobs get down to the none debt fuelled level then we'll be in shit.

sorry to all the graduates that have done non courses (incl myself in a way) but you've loaded up on 20k of debt for a 12k job, for a big chunk of your life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.