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Public Sector Workers: 9 Years Less Work And Paid 30% More

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http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/news/article.html?in_article_id=506450&in_page_id=2&ct=5

Public sector workers work nine years less

By James Chapman

18 June 2010, 7:31am

Public sector employees work nine years less than their private sector counterparts but are paid 30% more, according to a think-tank.

Authors of the research say it tells a tale of two Britains - a state sector awash with taxpayers' cash while the rest of the economy struggles to stay afloat.

Public sector workers enjoy better pay than those in the private sector, as well as better pensions, shorter hours, and earlier retirement.

Over their lifetimes, those in the private sector work 23% longer - equivalent to an extra nine years and ten weeks - than public sector employees. This is thanks to a combination of shorter hours, more time off and earlier retirement.

The findings explode once and for all the old idea that public sector workers have better job security and gold-plated pensions because they have lower salaries.

They will be seized on by the Coalition Government, which has warned that the bloated state sector has been artificially insulated from the recession and is in line for massive spending cuts.

The report, by centre-Right think tank Policy Exchange, also found that the chance of being made compulsorily redundant in the civil service is an astonishing 0.00007%.

Generous pension schemes in the state sector are now worth up to 15% on top of salary, the report says, while public sector pay costs have soared by more than a third in real terms over the last seven years - three times faster than in the private sector.

The report uses figures from the Office for National Statistics to show that more than seven million people are now employed in the public sector, over a million more than official figures suggest.

And £4bn more is spent on marketing, PR, customer service and office managers' jobs in the public sector than in 2002.

Policy Exchange director Neil O'Brien said: 'Under the last government the pay bill got totally out of control, increasing three times faster than in the private sector. Pay spiralled even though productivity was collapsing.

'We should freeze the public sector pay bill in cash terms for the next four years, taking the pay bill back to where it was in 2003 in real terms. We should also follow the example of Ireland and other European countries, and ask public sector workers to pay some more towards their pensions.'

publicsectorDM_468x286.jpg

The report says median gross pay is now £22,417 in the public sector and £19,932 in the private sector. It adds that between 1997 and 2007 public sector productivity fell, while productivity in the private sector increased by nearly 28%.

Between 2002 and 2009, the number working in the public sector increased nearly five times more quickly than numbers in the private sector.

The report says that on an hourly basis, the typical public sector worker is 30% better paid than their private sector counterpart. Before 1997, when Labour came to power, private and public sector salaries rose at similar rates. But between 2002 and 2009, typical pay grew 86% faster in the public sector, partly funded by additional public spending. Meanwhile, real earnings for private workers have been largely stagnant since 2002.

Between 1997 and 2008 the proportion of public sector workers without any pension provision from their employer fell from 21% to 16%.

However, in the private sector the same figure increased from 54% to 63%.

While the proportion of public sector workers in generous defined-benefit schemes has risen, the number in the private sector has progressively declined - to just 8% of the workforce compared to 80% in the public sector by 2007.

TUC General Secretary Brendan Barber said it was 'impossible' to accurately compare private and public sector pay because of the higher number of skilled and professional workers and differences in the nature of jobs.

He said the report used 'deliberately misleading' figures and painted 'every nurse, every doctor, every teacher as a drag on the economy'.

Words fail me. Too much revelation in that article to put in bold... We're screwed. :(

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http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/news/article.html?in_article_id=506450&in_page_id=2&ct=5

Public sector workers work nine years less

By James Chapman

18 June 2010, 7:31am

Words fail me. Too much revelation in that article to put in bold... We're screwed. :(

Correction: They are screwed.

These people are in for a shock. More and more people are talking about them, more and more people cant afford to live never mind pay these theives to have a great job/life.

Remember when people had a strike to get more pay better conditions....it's time the private sector employess went on strike to demand pay cuts for the public sectors.

Why are we funding these people, who it has to be said whinge, provide a terrible service and are obnoxios, when we cant pay for our own food/fuel/pensions.

We need a one day strike by the private sector...so the public sector realise who actually pays them and that they should be worse off than those who do.

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yeah saw that and thoguth some of the figures seem out.manager financial institiution public sector £7k?

and thats after a 60% increase laugh.gif

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It's on their front page:

Controlling Public Spending

Public sector workers now enjoy better pay than private sector workers, as well as better pensions, shorter hours, and earlier retirement.

This report breaks the myth that public sector workers have high pensions to compensate for low salaries and shows that there is scope to make savings in the public sector without being unfair.

http://www.policyexchange.org.uk/

** due to technical problems a download of this report is not currently available**

:lol::lol:

**please email info@policyexchange.org.uk to receive a copy by email**

Edited by AvidFan

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painter and decorator £44K ???? this report is total nonsense and complete tripe. Who writes this shite ?

The Policy Exchange - it tells you on the made-up chart who made up the figures. You can also see that security guards earn below the legal minimum wage. It amazes me how stupid people are to fall for this kind of rubbish, but the fact is that most people don't actually read the article and just look at the headline and first few sentences. The Mail is particularly "clever" at this form of deception, look at house price ramping "news" where the Nationwide predictions of falls are in the last few words.

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The distortion between the sectors is that the NHS, universities, schools, even Local Authorities, employment is scewed towards high skill work. This explains the later entry age and the higher pay.

Comparing like for like is key, all else encourages blind prejudice.

And we don't have that on this Forum, do we?

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Oh dear, the usual claptrap from the daily wail - who reads this rubbish!!

These figures refer to 2002-9 but what about the 80's & 90's when the private sector generally had much bigger rises than the public sector?? No one complained then did they!

Also, public sector workers are generally higher qualified - not many GCSE's needed to work in MCDonalds or Netto.

Are we supposed to admire the self employed private sector such as builders who fiddle the tax and VAT and don't bother with pensions so the state support them in later life??

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Also, public sector workers are generally higher qualified - not many GCSE's needed to work in MCDonalds or Netto.

????????????

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Teaching professional: £33K (public) £26K (private). This is utter bunkum. For a start, the state sector has more classroom assistants, which keeps the average down. I don't believe this at all.

Where did they get these figures?

Suggestion:

=randbetween(5000,50000)

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Also, public sector workers are generally higher qualified - not many GCSE's needed to work in MCDonalds or Netto.

The arrogance of the public sector encapsulated in one easy sentence.

Looking down on people who probably work 3 or 4 times harder than they do.

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The arrogance of the public sector encapsulated in one easy sentence.

Looking down on people who probably work 3 or 4 times harder than they do.

+1

Next will be the 'laminating paperclips' one,

half of me wishes I had a public sector job but the other half knows I couldn't cope with the level beaurocracy or management and lack of creativity compared to what I actually do

It takes all sorts in life but when one can't appreciate each others issues it just shows ignorance

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Correction: They are screwed.

These people are in for a shock. More and more people are talking about them, more and more people cant afford to live never mind pay these theives to have a great job/life.

Remember when people had a strike to get more pay better conditions....it's time the private sector employess went on strike to demand pay cuts for the public sectors.

Why are we funding these people, who it has to be said whinge, provide a terrible service and are obnoxios, when we cant pay for our own food/fuel/pensions.

We need a one day strike by the private sector...so the public sector realise who actually pays them and that they should be worse off than those who do.

Cannot agree more, I know loads of people in the private sector (colleagues and friends alike) who have been made redundant, had hours/salary cuts and pay freezes. It is awful and we should never bend over for employers but it is pretty much no alternative when a company is losing money and not profitable.

Why can the public sector admin spods, management and smoking cessation officers et al not realise this.

If Unison etc do strike at they will the private sector should come out and say F-off and get real we are fed up of slaving for you lot! I am up for it!!!!!!

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Teaching professional: £33K (public) £26K (private). This is utter bunkum. For a start, the state sector has more classroom assistants, which keeps the average down. I don't believe this at all.

Where did they get these figures?

Suggestion:

=randbetween(5000,50000)

That might be the bald figures for salary but it says nothing about perks. Private school teachers always get discounted rates if they want to enrol their own kids at their school, often about 50%. Given the average annual fees for private education in edinburgh at least seems to hover around the 10K mark, that's a 5K perk. And of course a state school teacher would need to earn about 8-9k to get that 5k after the tax and NI had been taken off.

Edited by noodle doodle

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The arrogance of the public sector encapsulated in one easy sentence.

Looking down on people who probably work 3 or 4 times harder than they do.

work smarter, not harder

And is that not symptomatic of the deluded laminated paperclip ;-) brigade, reckoning they work harder because private somehow means tougher. I agree they have to work harder to justify their role in society, so perhaps its guilt that keeps these particular hamsters spinning their wheels.

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I think this is grossly unfair. If they work 9 years less, it stands to reason you need to pay them more to make up for the loss of earnings.

Tchh - I thought you guys knew about economics...

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+1

Next will be the 'laminating paperclips' one,

half of me wishes I had a public sector job but the other half knows I couldn't cope with the level beaurocracy or management and lack of creativity compared to what I actually do

It takes all sorts in life but when one can't appreciate each others issues it just shows ignorance

Having worked on a few projects with the public sector from my own, personal perspective, they are unlike any other client across the broad spectrum of private sector clients i come into contact! It is like dealing with people from a different country – frankly there is something Kafka-esque about the routines and pettiness that is not seen in the private sector from SME’s to multi nationals that i have dealt with.

The employees are yet another example of the ‘Age of Entitlement’ mindset that seems to have robbed people of their sense of perspective; the country is bust so who and how the hell do they think it will not affect grossly inflated public sector numbers, pay and pension?!?!?!

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....

Where did they get these figures?

....

The ultimate source according to the table is ONS. So the lies are basically the misinterpretation of job categories. Security guard for example could include the new Wannabee Coppers, whatever they are called, "teacher" might include college lecturer but exclude teaching assistant. Its pretty easy to fiddle the numbers if you want to, as an analyst I've seen plenty of it over the years.

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