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Dave Beans

Getting In The Back Of A Police Car

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I've been told that you don't actually have to get into the back of Police car if you don't want to, because you are then on "their territory"..is this right? Can you refuse to get in? I know it certainly helps them in their job, as you can incriminate yourself on camera..

There's an interesting thread about it at Honest John's

http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=78416

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I've been told that you don't actually have to get into the back of Police car if you don't want to, because you are then on "their territory"..is this right?  Can you refuse to get in?  I know it certainly helps them in their job, as you can incriminate yourself on camera..

There's an interesting thread about it at Honest John's

http://www.honestjoh...dex.htm?t=78416

You can tell us.... what happened?

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If they do invite you into the back of their nice warm car (for a chat) then you can refuse but then if they have grounds (and you not telling them your name is grounds enough) they can arrest you and chuck you in there anyway.

Once nicely seated ask for a copy of PACE as you need to swot up on your rights before you answer any of their questions. (They are by law required to provide it and if there is not a copy in the car they will have to send out for one). Keep your gob shut until you have the copy and politely ignore any of their questions.

When it arrives spend the next 5 hours (or as long as necessary) reading it or until plod gets pissed of and asks you to leave the nice warm motor.

When asked any questions reply simply and politely no comment get into no argument or discussion otherwise on what has occurred.

If they arrest you then they probably have all the evidence they need to proceed against you for whatever it is you have done. If they invite you into the car for a chat then they don't. 95% of people then give them the evidence they need under questioning.

Remember anything you say under caution can be used in evidence against you in court so best keep stum. They won't like it but but hey those are your rights.

They got me into the nick at West End Central in 1976ish once. Me and my mate were teenagers and had done a runner from a wimpy in Oxford Street (after a lunchtime on the lash). Anyway it was alleged I had punched an officer effecting my arrest. It was his word against mine. I would not make a statement or answer any of their questions so got the mattress treatment in the cells in an attempt to get me to confess. Later that evening they released us charged with drunk and disorderly and me assault on a police officer. Monday morning at Bow St Magistrates I pleaded guilty to the DD and not guilty to the assault charge which they dropped due to lack of evidence (from my own mouth). £12 fine thanks very much and we were back in the pub in time for lunch.

From that day to this I have always paid from my food it was a stupid thing to do on that day and I regret it but it was part of growing up....

As for plod I hardly touched him.

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You can tell us.... what happened?

I think I'm moderately good...I've been breathalysed a couple of times over the last ten years & was stopped towards the end of last year as a bulb was out..

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If they do invite you into the back of their nice warm car (for a chat) then you can refuse but then if they have grounds (and you not telling them your name is grounds enough) they can arrest you and chuck you in there anyway.

Once nicely seated ask for a copy of PACE as you need to swot up on your rights before you answer any of their questions. (They are by law required to provide it and if there is not a copy in the car they will have to send out for one). Keep your gob shut until you have the copy and politely ignore any of their questions.

When it arrives spend the next 5 hours (or as long as necessary) reading it or until plod gets pissed of and asks you to leave the nice warm motor.

When asked any questions reply simply and politely no comment get into no argument or discussion otherwise on what has occurred.

If they arrest you then they probably have all the evidence they need to proceed against you for whatever it is you have done. If they invite you into the car for a chat then they don't. 95% of people then give them the evidence they need under questioning.

Remember anything you say under caution can be used in evidence against you in court so best keep stum. They won't like it but but hey those are your rights.

They got me into the nick at West End Central in 1976ish once. Me and my mate were teenagers and had done a runner from a wimpy in Oxford Street (after a lunchtime on the lash). Anyway it was alleged I had punched an officer effecting my arrest. It was his word against mine. I would not make a statement or answer any of their questions so got the mattress treatment in the cells in an attempt to get me to confess. Later that evening they released us charged with drunk and disorderly and me assault on a police officer. Monday morning at Bow St Magistrates I pleaded guilty to the DD and not guilty to the assault charge which they dropped due to lack of evidence (from my own mouth). £12 fine thanks very much and we were back in the pub in time for lunch.

From that day to this I have always paid from my food it was a stupid thing to do on that day and I regret it but it was part of growing up....

As for plod I hardly touched him.

but I thought the baby boomers had constructive meaningful experiences as youths and all worked hard from the age of 15 in a factory/national service/shi*t shovelling/helping old ladies etc?

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I have watched enough of the cop tv programs to know to be polite to the cops and do whatever they ask quickly and without being gobby.

Whilst you might have the right to say no, you're just being a pain for them - it's quieter, easier and warmer to write stuff down when you're sat down in a car.

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I have watched enough of the cop tv programs to know to be polite to the cops and do whatever they ask quickly and without being gobby.

At least the Soviet citizen knew he lived in chains.

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but I thought the baby boomers had constructive meaningful experiences as youths and all worked hard from the age of 15 in a factory/national service/shi*t shovelling/helping old ladies etc?

Anyone that did National Service these days will be long time retired or have the yoovs of today gainfully employed wiping the spittle from their chins and sorting out their incontinence problems.

I did join the army around 9 Months after this event but did so of my own free will. If they had convicted me of the Assault charge then this would not have been possible. I spent 20+ years in the end in the service and the experiences and training I gained dictated what I did in my career following on.

Just goes to show how one moment of madness could have a life altering effect on ones life.

Then there was the time we were in Paris for an exchange visit in about 1982ish. We had been given a day off so went up town for a drink or three. There were 4 of us all young para's. Anyway the talk turned to the French Foreign Legion and we decided to play a trick on the youngest lad with us. We had a few beers and all promised to go down and join the FFL. We found out where their HQ was in Paris and trotted off down there to sign up. After a lot of form filling we were called into interview individually where they kept asking if we were sure we wanted to sign on. At last knockings 3 of us backed out but the 4th didn't thinking we were all in it together. We left he did not.

Some 6 Months later and intervention by the Diplomatic service/MOD/French Embassy at a high level he was returned. Bad news was he got 28 days jail for being AWOL, the good news was he had learnt French and it was perfect.

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I have watched enough of the cop tv programs to know to be polite to the cops and do whatever they ask quickly and without being gobby.

Whilst you might have the right to say no, you're just being a pain for them - it's quieter, easier and warmer to write stuff down when you're sat down in a car.

The road to thirsk is a mine field.

You get stopped and lectured if you are not deemed to be wearing the proper biking gear, full textiles or full leathers. Even though a helmet is the only thing required by law.

If you do not listen to them or find them patronising you get stopped and searched. I was riding near Thirsk and was stopped by a cop car stopping ALL bikes, he proceeded to lecture me about wearing the proper gear.

I stopped him dead in his tracks telling him about my Russian bike trip where I would ride through Mongolia in a pair of underpants (on some short bits where it got seriously hot) no helmet gloves just boots underpants and sunglasses. Which he had no answer to other than stopping and searching me AND giving me an obsolete producer out of spite.

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At least the Soviet citizen knew he lived in chains.

Yes, the police are only there to stitch people up and randomly abuse people to keep us all under control. That's why they stopped me on the motorway once, not because my brakes were jammed on, and I would've achieved so much more by being awkward with them, wouldn't I?

Sometimes they might well be petty ****s who deserve to played as awkwardly with as possible, but it's a childish reaction to behave like that towards them all the time.

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At least the Soviet citizen knew he lived in chains.

Well to be honest it's my mum's fault for bringing me up with the attitude "if you ever get lost ask a policeman" rather than the "if you don't behave I'll get that police man to lock you up" (And yes I have heard that off chavvy mums)

I am always polite to those in authority - teachers, judges, police officers. I don't see it as a problem.

If you ever notice they wear shirt sleeves and no coat then you'd probably think they liked sitting in the warm rather than taking your details by the roadside.

What's your excuse going to be? "No I'm allergic to the back of police cars"?

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Anyone that did National Service these days will be long time retired or have the yoovs of today gainfully employed wiping the spittle from their chins and sorting out their incontinence problems.

I did join the army around 9 Months after this event but did so of my own free will. If they had convicted me of the Assault charge then this would not have been possible. I spent 20+ years in the end in the service and the experiences and training I gained dictated what I did in my career following on.

Duncan Bannatyne has a story like that he was conscripted into the navy and near the end of his stint his knocked an officer out for being a git and was dihonorably discharged. He talks about it quite fondly...

National service is stupid anyway, as you can't send infantry to their deaths as easily as volunteer soldiers who signed up for it and you have demotivated soldiers who don't want to be there and are ineffective soldiers. Granted you might get the odd sociopath gem the kind that wins VCs (postumously) but most conscripts make poor infantry.

Conscripts as merely slave armies.

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Duncan Bannatyne has a story like that he was conscripted into the navy and near the end of his stint his knocked an officer out for being a git and was dihonorably discharged. He talks about it quite fondly...

National service is stupid anyway, as you can't send infantry to their deaths as easily as volunteer soldiers who signed up for it and you have demotivated soldiers who don't want to be there and are ineffective soldiers. Granted you might get the odd sociopath gem the kind that wins VCs (postumously) but most conscripts make poor infantry.

Conscripts as merely slave armies.

All of which is why the armed forces are very much against it. They don't want to have to deal with a bunch of losers who don't want to be there either.

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Yes, the police are only there to stitch people up and randomly abuse people to keep us all under control. That's why they stopped me on the motorway once, not because my brakes were jammed on, and I would've achieved so much more by being awkward with them, wouldn't I?

Sometimes they might well be petty ****s who deserve to played as awkwardly with as possible, but it's a childish reaction to behave like that towards them all the time.

The problem is the negative experiences stick with you more than any positive experiences, and each negative experience builds up. I mean I can't remember any time I had a postive experience or a decent outcome with police. So your home gets broken into they just give you a crime number and slink off. (Been burgled a few times) Once for me you're being beaten up somebody phones the cops only to be told there are no availible units to help.

Also the time when I worked at Blockbuster for a few months, there was a cafe nearby which was on a busy road, you'd see them park up on dog tooth lines everyday and every 1145am there would be a police emergency where you would hear horns and blue flashing lights. Only for the cop car to stop on the dog tooth lines park up and go inside for some lunch.

2-3 cop cars would congregate there EVERYDAY.

When they went to leave if nobody let them out they would turn on their blue flashing lights.

Events such as police extra judicial executions do not help either or the way police are almost always given the benefit of the doubt.

Delbo King who was seen being beaten up by cops - no charge

The execution of Harry Stanley where he was shot in the back of the head contradicting the armed police story that he turned around and held it like a gun to them.

The execution of a certain brazilian electrician where smears were made against him about being an illegal about him being a rapist, and the CCTV conveniently went missing.

Mr Tomlinson

Blair Peach

The list goes on and on and on, and yet nobody ever seems to get into trouble for these things, the police do not inspire confidence in people therefore why should they deserve any respect or help?

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Granted you might get the odd sociopath gem the kind that wins VCs (postumously) but most conscripts make poor infantry.

Unless the reason for conscription enjoys widespread popular support, e.g. WWII. But pledging to abolish it was arguably the only reason the Tories were re-elected in 1959. By that time, a critical mass of voters had experienced peacetime conscription and not liked it one bit.

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The list goes on and on and on, and yet nobody ever seems to get into trouble for these things, the police do not inspire confidence in people therefore why should they deserve any respect or help?

Vicious circle - works both ways. If everyone the police sees treat them with contempt they'll react like that towards just about everyone they see, which in turn results in the public treating them with more contempt, and so on. And when they do pick up a genuine criminal the type of irritating, petty reaction from the police is perfectly justified. Both the police and the public need to remember that the police are just another bunch of human beings.

Personally I've never had any hassle with them. Stopped for the brake light is about all, and that's fair enough. From the stories you hear you expect them to be jumping on every minor offence they encounter, but they didn't seem bothered about the pub being open when it should've been closed when they came in to ask if anyone had seen the post office over the road getting broken in to.

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Vicious circle - works both ways. If everyone the police sees treat them with contempt they'll react like that towards just about everyone they see, which in turn results in the public treating them with more contempt, and so on. And when they do pick up a genuine criminal the type of irritating, petty reaction from the police is perfectly justified. Both the police and the public need to remember that the police are just another bunch of human beings.

Personally I've never had any hassle with them. Stopped for the brake light is about all, and that's fair enough. From the stories you hear you expect them to be jumping on every minor offence they encounter, but they didn't seem bothered about the pub being open when it should've been closed when they came in to ask if anyone had seen the post office over the road getting broken in to.

I'm sure that the more obtuse you are with them, the more that they're going to do to try and find fault with your car, so that they can get you on something..

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I'm sure that the more obtuse you are with them, the more that they're going to do to try and find fault with your car, so that they can get you on something..

Yep. Some of the most stupid 'advice' I have ever heard. And yes I hjave experience of being both 'cheeky' with the coppers and ncie and polite so I know what I am talking about.

Yes some Coppers and grade A knobbers. However many are not. You have to assume you have one of the decent ones and just do as they say. If so - it will all end up fine and dandy.

If you are nice to a bawbag Officer ? He may go easy on you but will probably do you over anyway.

If you are an arsehole to a bawbag officer ? He will not go easy on you and will make your life as difficult as possible.

If you are nice to a nice officer ? Job done. No need to worry about anything.

If you are an arsehole to a nice officer ? You are risking giving away your easy option. Not a smart move IMO.

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No one should be afraid of the consequences for failing to get into the back of a plod car.

Simply keep your gob firmly shut when you are in there.

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No one should be afraid of the consequences for failing to get into the back of a plod car.

Simply keep your gob firmly shut when you are in there.

Which, if it's about nothing particularly serious, is just going to make the police suspicious of you (as well as annoy them) and result in them being more likely to make your life difficult. Better just to let them tell you to get your headlight sorted, what's the problem? Shutting up is only sensible if you know you're justifiably in serious trouble (but then I hope they make your life hell) or if they're determined to be a knob for no good reason and seem clearly inclined to try to twist anything you say to hang something off you.

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I've been told that you don't actually have to get into the back of Police car if you don't want to, because you are then on "their territory"..is this right? Can you refuse to get in? I know it certainly helps them in their job, as you can incriminate yourself on camera..

There's an interesting thread about it at Honest John's

http://www.honestjohn.co.uk/forum/post/index.htm?t=78416

There is a lot of rubbish on that thread. Basically, if you get stopped for a minor road traffic offence, you will be invited into the back of the car. The main reasons being that its often cold outside and I dont want to stand in the road plus its easier to do the neccesary person/vehicle checks. Also I want to make sure the person doesn't do one. You could open the window slightly, refuse to get out and give the officer all the information he needs however I wouldn't recommend this as the 'Ways and Means Act' may be envoked by cetain officers.

Its is really only 'traffic' cars that have recording equipment and yes it could be used for any replys after caution etc (Doubtful as by the time it gets to court 4 months later it will have been wiped and the officer will not care, he gives out 100 tickets and 2 or 3 might get contested). Getting basic details does not constitute and interview with somebody so PACE interview requirements do not apply in this circumstance.

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Which, if it's about nothing particularly serious, is just going to make the police suspicious of you (as well as annoy them) and result in them being more likely to make your life difficult. Better just to let them tell you to get your headlight sorted, what's the problem? Shutting up is only sensible if you know you're justifiably in serious trouble (but then I hope they make your life hell) or if they're determined to be a knob for no good reason and seem clearly inclined to try to twist anything you say to hang something off you.

Depends on what you call serious. If it is a headlight or indicator bulb they will ask you to get out of the car and show you the offending article. Its unlikely they will invite you in for a sit down.

In such circumstances they already have everything they need to issue a fixed penalty which they probably will do. They need nothing further from you albeit to confirm your name and address and ownership (or not) of the vehicle. If it is not yours they will want to see proof of insurance and licence to drive.

By the time they stop you they will already know the name and address of the vehicle owner,whether that person is insured to drive the vehicle and the last date it was MOT'd as well of of course any other pertinent info held on the PNC.

If you are party to a moving traffic accident and a third party makes an allegation against you, or they suspect from the way the accident occurred that an offence took place then the police will question you for your version of events. Depending on the circumstances and how you answer those questions will determine whether a charge of driving without due care (or possibly more serious) will follow.

Did you know for example for you to say you never saw car, pedestrian or other before you collided with it makes you automatically guilty of a driving without due care charge, even if it was another vehicle and it pulled out in front of you.

In the case of a pedestrian and a death ensues then it is possible for a charge of causing death by dangerous driving to be levied particularly if you were a little over the speed limit or again admitted you did not see the person.

A Conviction of causing death by dangerous driving carries some serious jail time........

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Live a little! Its not that bad though an acquaintance who was riding across Russia (I had a month head start but was going through Turkey) was invited into the back of a Russian cop car where he had a gun held to his head and was patted down for money.

The had demanded a 5000 rouble bribe, but found his wallet had 8000 in it, so they demanded 10,000 roubles, he had 30,000 roubles hidden in his underpants and they didn't find it, after numerous protests at I don't have it, the cops cocked their guns took him outside and forced him onto his knees. He protested he didn't have anymore got pistol whipped on the back of the head and his 8000 roubles stolen.

I had similar run ins with Azeri cops, who would demand to see your passport grab it and stick it in their pockets and demand money for it back. Happens in central Asia a lot, bikers eventually learn NEVER to stop at check points and only to stop if a cop car is sent to intercept you.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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