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timebandit

Help Me Draft A Letter To The Relevant Departments

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Last night I was working in a public sector building. I was surprised to see two free to use water coolers on our floor and was informed that it was the same on the other three floors in the building.

My belief that this a luxury that we can not afford and would like to find out the cost to the taxpayer. My letter writing skills are awful any help in drafting a letter appreciated. Secondly do we have a national link, email or address for suggestions to save on Government waste.

P.S

My agency job was also a waste of money however after redundancy, I take what I can. ;)

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Afternoon,

We don't need all the water coolers. Use a tap instead. Same shit different dog.

Cheers,

Timebandit.

-------------------------------

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It's somebody else's money after all.

Cornwall Council:

After the Packet revealed in 2004 that Cornwall county council was spending £74,000-a-year on bottled water guarantees were given that cheaper alternatives would be investigated.

County councillor Mark Kaczmarek tells me, however, that nearly two years later staff are still guzzling mineral water at our expense. In fact, according to the campaigning councillor, this "scandalous waste of public money" is getting worse rather than better, with bottled water now available at every school and new council building.

Bottled water is the biggest rip-off ever seen in this country, netting millions of pounds for an industry that must be laughing all the way to the bank at the expense of a gullible public.

The water that comes out of our taps is perfectly fit and safe to drink and, what's more, it costs a fraction of the price of the bottled stuff. If anything, tap water is, in some parts of Cornwall, over-chlorinated, but this can be remedied if it really bothers you with simple and cheap filters. Tap water can also be piped into refrigeration units at minimal cost to make it more refreshing.

Why, then, has Cornwall county council ignored public outrage over the vast sums of money wasted on bottled water? There are two answers: arrogance and inefficiency. Arrogance because they don't really give a damn what the public who pay their wages think and inefficiency because somebody was probably asked 18 months ago to investigate alternatives to bottled water and, as usual, that will take at least two years to work its way through the bureaucratic maze.

It's about time someone at County Hall came up with an idea for making money instead of spending it bottled Cornish air, personally blessed by council leader David Whalley, for sale to tourists, perhaps?

http://archive.falmouthpacket.co.uk/2006/4/19/55054.html

And Hampshire Coucnil:

Bottled water expense 'justified'

Panorama issued a Freedom of Information request to councils

A council in Hampshire says it is justified in spending more than £141,000 a year on bottled water.

Hampshire County Council is top of a list of bottled water expenditure by local authorities in England and Wales, conducted for the BBC's Panorama.

Council leader Ken Thornber said the authority had cut its bottled water usage but staff were entitled to it.

The programme, Bottled Water - Who Needs It? found councils had a bill totalling more than £5m.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hampshire/7251005.stm

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Write it in terms the scumbag politicians understand

Like,

I was working in a public building when i came across water dispensers. I know for a fact these are delivered by a man in van. A van that produces terrible carbon. Carbon that is killing poor people and has given us these awful medditeranean summers and made Londoners have to swim to work because of the sea level being 10metres higher than it was last year. Please stop this destruction by getting rid of the water dispensers. Also van drivers are mostly white and male, possibly tory baby eaters, and its awful these people are partaking in such wanton destruction.

Never know, might work if you live in Brent, Haringey, Hackney or similar.

Mention 'saving money' and their brains will probably explode.

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It's not uncommon to find modern office blocks without piped drinking water. I've worked in a couple that had 'don't drink the water signs over the taps in the kitchens' and had water coolers instead. Maybe there's a plumber here who can explain that?

There's absolutely no justiciation for bottled water in small bottles though, it's unbelievably expensive compared to the large sized ones used in free-standing water coolers.

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It's not uncommon to find modern office blocks without piped drinking water. I've worked in a couple that had 'don't drink the water signs over the taps in the kitchens' and had water coolers instead. Maybe there's a plumber here who can explain that?

There's absolutely no justiciation for bottled water in small bottles though, it's unbelievably expensive compared to the large sized ones used in free-standing water coolers.

I've seen that and can't quite work it out. If there are taps fed by the public watrer supply then it's drinking quality water, surely? The alternative is that there is some little-known secondary system of supply supplying non-drinking quality water which seems a tad far fetched - not to mention a pointless waste of time and money.

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I've seen that and can't quite work it out. If there are taps fed by the public watrer supply then it's drinking quality water, surely? The alternative is that there is some little-known secondary system of supply supplying non-drinking quality water which seems a tad far fetched - not to mention a pointless waste of time and money.

could be from a roof or high level tank...complete with dead mammals floating in it.

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You need a tap marked "drinking water" else it probably is pigeon water from a tank.

I think they are incredibly expensive.

Do a FOI request via that site someone listed the other day -

http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/

There is some

http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/search/bottled%20water/bodies

it's be interesting to see each council's bill.

In fact email the telegraph and persuade them to do a "bottled water cuts" article

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It's not uncommon to find modern office blocks without piped drinking water. I've worked in a couple that had 'don't drink the water signs over the taps in the kitchens' and had water coolers instead. Maybe there's a plumber here who can explain that?

There's absolutely no justiciation for bottled water in small bottles though, it's unbelievably expensive compared to the large sized ones used in free-standing water coolers.

Tescoes sells 2 litre bottles for about 12p. 13p for the fizzy stuff. Cheaper than the large delivered bottles, I suspect.

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Guest sillybear2

Tescoes sells 2 litre bottles for about 12p. 13p for the fizzy stuff. Cheaper than the large delivered bottles, I suspect.

Still very bad for your sky gypsy footprints.

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It's not uncommon to find modern office blocks without piped drinking water. I've worked in a couple that had 'don't drink the water signs over the taps in the kitchens' and had water coolers instead. Maybe there's a plumber here who can explain that?

Mains water is delivered at pressure, but in tall blocks, mains pressure may not be adequate to reach the top floors. So, an additional pumping/storage system is required.

Drinking water has strict criteria on how it can be handled - what the pipes/tanks are made of, how tightly they are sealed, the stagnation time, etc.

The cheap way of piping water to a large building is just to use a pump to pump the water onto a tank on the roof - because the tank stores a lot of water, the pump only needs to be powerful enough to keep the tank topped up - it doesn't need to deliver sudden surges when someone flushes a toilet. Once there, the water will make it around the building under its own pressure. Because the water level has to fluctuate, the tank can't be sealed tight - so what tends to happen is that insects/mice/rats/birds tend to get in, and get stuck - so you end up with decomposing corpses in the water. Additionally, the water may stagnate (particularly over weekends), and the once the chlorine evaporates, microbes can start growing.

Supplying drinking water is a bit more involved - what normally happens is that mains water fills a small ground level stainless steel (or appropriate drinking-water grade plastic) tank - which is sealed but fitted with special filtered vents (which allow air in and out, but keep insects and stuff out). The tank has to be sufficiently small, that you don't get stagnation - i.e. even over a weekend, water demand should be enough to flush the tank through a few times. High pressure, high flow-rate pumps are then used to pump it around the building, as it is required. This requires much bigger and more expensive pumps with special pressure regulators, in order to keep up with peak demand (which may be 10x higher than average demand). This type of infrastructure is expensive and requires more complex and frequent maintenance. It is also requires a constant electricity supply (the roof tank system will still store (typically) 24 hours of water if the pump breaks or has no power) - a drinking water system will stop flowing as soon as the power fails.

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Mains water is delivered at pressure, but in tall blocks, mains pressure may not be adequate to reach the top floors. So, an additional pumping/storage system is required.

Drinking water has strict criteria on how it can be handled - what the pipes/tanks are made of, how tightly they are sealed, the stagnation time, etc.

The cheap way of piping water to a large building is just to use a pump to pump the water onto a tank on the roof - because the tank stores a lot of water, the pump only needs to be powerful enough to keep the tank topped up - it doesn't need to deliver sudden surges when someone flushes a toilet. Once there, the water will make it around the building under its own pressure. Because the water level has to fluctuate, the tank can't be sealed tight - so what tends to happen is that insects/mice/rats/birds tend to get in, and get stuck - so you end up with decomposing corpses in the water. Additionally, the water may stagnate (particularly over weekends), and the once the chlorine evaporates, microbes can start growing.

Supplying drinking water is a bit more involved - what normally happens is that mains water fills a small ground level stainless steel (or appropriate drinking-water grade plastic) tank - which is sealed but fitted with special filtered vents (which allow air in and out, but keep insects and stuff out). The tank has to be sufficiently small, that you don't get stagnation - i.e. even over a weekend, water demand should be enough to flush the tank through a few times. High pressure, high flow-rate pumps are then used to pump it around the building, as it is required. This requires much bigger and more expensive pumps with special pressure regulators, in order to keep up with peak demand (which may be 10x higher than average demand). This type of infrastructure is expensive and requires more complex and frequent maintenance. It is also requires a constant electricity supply (the roof tank system will still store (typically) 24 hours of water if the pump breaks or has no power) - a drinking water system will stop flowing as soon as the power fails.

Well, you learn something new every day, thanks for that.

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Guest anorthosite

Mains water is delivered at pressure, but in tall blocks, mains pressure may not be adequate to reach the top floors. So, an additional pumping/storage system is required.

Drinking water has strict criteria on how it can be handled - what the pipes/tanks are made of, how tightly they are sealed, the stagnation time, etc.

The cheap way of piping water to a large building is just to use a pump to pump the water onto a tank on the roof - because the tank stores a lot of water, the pump only needs to be powerful enough to keep the tank topped up - it doesn't need to deliver sudden surges when someone flushes a toilet. Once there, the water will make it around the building under its own pressure. Because the water level has to fluctuate, the tank can't be sealed tight - so what tends to happen is that insects/mice/rats/birds tend to get in, and get stuck - so you end up with decomposing corpses in the water. Additionally, the water may stagnate (particularly over weekends), and the once the chlorine evaporates, microbes can start growing.

Supplying drinking water is a bit more involved - what normally happens is that mains water fills a small ground level stainless steel (or appropriate drinking-water grade plastic) tank - which is sealed but fitted with special filtered vents (which allow air in and out, but keep insects and stuff out). The tank has to be sufficiently small, that you don't get stagnation - i.e. even over a weekend, water demand should be enough to flush the tank through a few times. High pressure, high flow-rate pumps are then used to pump it around the building, as it is required. This requires much bigger and more expensive pumps with special pressure regulators, in order to keep up with peak demand (which may be 10x higher than average demand). This type of infrastructure is expensive and requires more complex and frequent maintenance. It is also requires a constant electricity supply (the roof tank system will still store (typically) 24 hours of water if the pump breaks or has no power) - a drinking water system will stop flowing as soon as the power fails.

hoff1.jpg

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Last night I was working in a public sector building. I was surprised to see two free to use water coolers on our floor and was informed that it was the same on the other three floors in the building.

My belief that this a luxury that we can not afford and would like to find out the cost to the taxpayer. My letter writing skills are awful any help in drafting a letter appreciated. Secondly do we have a national link, email or address for suggestions to save on Government waste.

P.S

My agency job was also a waste of money however after redundancy, I take what I can. ;)

Ah well, thats the waste you get for expecting them to act like the private sector. :)

My private sector company provides water. I've been to big companies where fridges of cans of Pepsi and similar just sit in the corridors for staff to help themselves as and when they like. Its amazing the attitudes that develop. No regard for costs or profit at all.

In that context water coolers are exceptionally frugal.

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My closest friends work in the private sector and variously get free things that are a lot more expensive than water (including lemonade at one place and fruit juice at another). I'm public sector and drink tap water as you'd like me to. I work there for the pension, I realise it's worth about 30% onto my salary, and that takes me to about the same as them. If they stop the pension, I've got absolutely no reason at all to sit there. Certainly not the pay or non pension benefits.

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  • 140 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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