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6 Month Versus 12 Month Renewal

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I've been in my flat for almost 3 years and it's come to that time of renewal again. We're quite luckly as we have the option to renew for 6 or 12 months.

I'm getting married next August so I obviously don't want to be renewing for a years as I'll be moving in my boyfriend so the the logical thing for me to do is renew for 6 months and then the other guys can do a years renewal when the 6 months is up.

The only issue is that my flatmates are digging their heals in regarding the length of renewal and I feel like they're trying to bully me into doing a 12 month renewal as it's more convenient for them. They're arguing that it's more secure for them (think the landlords will evict them) doing a years renewal and they're scared the landlords will put the rent up if I do a 6 month renewal. The actual tenancy on the flat has been running for 7 years and I can hardly imagine that our landlords will decide to evict the remaining flatmates as the landlords are a charity so need all the money they can get and we are very good tenants. They've also only ever put the rent up once in 7 years. If decide to keep the peace and sign a 12 month contract to stop them whinging and flapping, what can I do to assure that my name won't remain on the contract thus making me bound by it without costing me a disgusting amount of money? If I decide to stick to my guns (which I probablty will), what assurances can I give the flatmates that they won't be evicted?

I think t=my flatmates are being very silly and paranoid but I really don't want anymore arguing so if there is a way I can get around it all it would be a great help!

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I've been in my flat for almost 3 years and it's come to that time of renewal again.  We're quite luckly as we have the option to renew for 6 or 12 months. 

I'm getting married next August so I obviously don't want to be renewing for a years as I'll be moving in my boyfriend so the the logical thing for me to do is renew for 6 months and then the other guys can do a years renewal when the 6 months is up.

The only issue is that my flatmates are digging their heals in regarding the length of renewal and I feel like they're trying to bully me into doing a 12 month renewal as it's more convenient for them.  They're arguing that it's more secure for them (think the landlords will evict them) doing a years renewal and they're scared the landlords will put the rent up if I do a 6 month renewal.  The actual tenancy on the flat has been running for 7 years and I can hardly imagine that our landlords will decide to evict the remaining flatmates as the landlords are a charity so need all the money they can get and we are very good tenants.  They've also only ever put the rent up once in 7 years.  If decide to keep the peace and sign a 12 month contract to stop them whinging and flapping, what can I do to assure that my name won't remain on the contract thus making me bound by it without costing me a disgusting amount of money?  If I decide to stick to my guns (which I probablty will), what assurances can I give the flatmates that they won't be evicted?

I think t=my flatmates are being very silly and paranoid but I really don't want anymore arguing so if there is a way I can get around it all it would be a great help!

Stick to your guns. Unless your co-tenants want to guarantee (with a formal contract drawn up by a solicitor) that they will cover your rent if there is no tenant, you will not be covered no matter what they say now.

Verbal agreements are not worth they paper they're written on.

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Have you considered not renewing the contract at all?

If you don't renew at all, your tenancy automatically becomes a "Statutory Periodic Tenancy Agreement". That means your tenancy runs on month-by-month after the fixed term contract has expired. You don't have to state any notice to continue staying in the property.

Under the 1988 housing act, you can give one months notice to the landlord to quit the tenancy (or whatever minimum term your contract stipulates - if one exists).

Under the same act, the landlord has to give a minimum of two months notice to evict the tenants.

Your co-tenants may be pushy with getting you to sign up for a one year contract. But at the end of the day, the only thing they can do against you is hand in their own notice to the landlord for themselves to quit the tenancy - leaving you to pay the rent all by yourself. Judgeing by what you say, they're unlikely to do this, they'd simply be shooting themselves in the foot.

Tenants certainly can't evict co-tenants - only the landlord can do that. The ball's in your court - don't sign a 1 year lease.

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If you want to move out in 6 months time then sign a 6 month contract.

If you think you may be there for longer sign a 12 month contract.

They are right to be concerned about the rent increase. Landlords will try and put the rent up every time you want to sign a contract. They will cite inflation as an excuse.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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