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hedgefunded

This Rewarding People For Recycling Thing...

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I like Eric Pickles scrapping the stupid system of fines for putting out too much rubbish, or not recycling etc....

One of the reasons against it would be that it wouldn't work as people would fly tip or use other people's bins. Can't argue with that logic.

So now, your bin is going to get weighed and you get free cinema tickets and the like for recycling more. Great, but what's to stop you lobbing a load of bricks in? Or, if they check for recycleable materials, what's to stop you nicking someone else's tins and bottles?

Just wondering, I'm sure there's a sensible answer. We are talking local government after all.

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Guest X-QUORK

I support attempts to increase recycling, but this sort of thing has "Beware the law of unintended consequences" written all over it.

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Or, if they check for recycleable materials, what's to stop you nicking someone else's tins and bottles?

Probably the fact that the rewards will be next to worthless. They're talking about up to £135 a year worth of vouchers and tokens, no doubt of the spend X to save Y variety, non-combinable with existing equivalent offers already available for the asking, so the true value will be a fraction of that. If anyone wants to get rid of my rubbish before the bin men do for the sake of a tenner a year, they're more than welcome.

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As somebody who cooks from scratch to reduce packaging, this idea strikes me as a slap in the face. When I shop, I reward companies that have taken the effort to minimize packaging. Again, this policy makes a mockery of my efforts. I have in recent years realised that all my goodwill towards society has been misplaced. I will actively be seeking ways to exploit this policy, whether it be throwing away milk cartons full of water / whatever works. I'll do this even though I don't want the stupid cinema tickets. Cinema only appeals to bored people / people with bored kids. Maybe I can sell the tickets on ebay. I'm really not bothered.

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Guest X-QUORK

It's actually very depressing that the only way to get some people to stop trashing the planet is to pay them.

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As somebody who cooks from scratch to reduce packaging, this idea strikes me as a slap in the face. When I shop, I reward companies that have taken the effort to minimize packaging.

+1. If they are to tax waste, it should be at source. But that would be a problem for Labour: too simple, insufficient red tape, no scope for creative flytipping, fraud, backhanders, snooping.

As for rewarding good behaviour, we could start by catching up with where much of Europe has been for ... as long as I can remember, with bottles having a deposit you get to collect when you return the empties.

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I like Eric Pickles scrapping the stupid system of fines for putting out too much rubbish, or not recycling etc....

One of the reasons against it would be that it wouldn't work as people would fly tip or use other people's bins. Can't argue with that logic.

So now, your bin is going to get weighed and you get free cinema tickets and the like for recycling more. Great, but what's to stop you lobbing a load of bricks in? Or, if they check for recycleable materials, what's to stop you nicking someone else's tins and bottles?

Just wondering, I'm sure there's a sensible answer. We are talking local government after all.

Where does the reward money come from? The Community Charge. You pay for your own prize. Wonderful.

p-o-p

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It's actually very depressing that the only way to get some people to stop trashing the planet is to pay them.

But it's not even doing that. It's paying them to create MORE waste.

15 years ago I chanced on a meeting at a local city hall where a guy was speaking about waste, in particular, incineration. He outlined the problems with all forms of waste treatment before drawing a large bath on an overhead projector. Water was flowing into the bath from the faucet. He asked us to view the bath as the earth and the water as waste. He compared the growing crisis to the water level reaching the top of the bath. He then compared the various waste treatments to methods of reducing the water in the bath : making the plug hole bigger, widening the overflow, using saucepans to bail out the water into another bath.

And then he asked us to make suggestions, based on everyday life, of how we'd go about stopping a bath from overflowing. Every man-jack with their hand up had the same answer: "turn off the tap".

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As for rewarding good behaviour, we could start by catching up with where much of Europe has been for ... as long as I can remember, with bottles having a deposit you get to collect when you return the empties.

That;'s not catching up with Europe, that's catching up with the UK circa 1970. When Corona was the nations favourite fizzy drink, it was commonplace to pay deposits. People think smashing and reforming is green. I suggest they try it with their rayburns and compare and contrast the method with boiling a sterilising kettle. Rather their bill than mine!

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Where does the reward money come from? The Community Charge. You pay for your own prize. Wonderful.

p-o-p

I wish you would not simplify things this way. Yesterday somebody applied the same argument to suggest suing Lloyds banking group would be an own goal for the litigants. The big waste makers will have their cinema tickets paid for by all, including people like me who make very little waste. They will be net winners. I will be a net loser.

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I wish you would not simplify things this way. Yesterday somebody applied the same argument to suggest suing Lloyds banking group would be an own goal for the litigants. The big waste makers will have their cinema tickets paid for by all, including people like me who make very little waste. They will be net winners. I will be a net loser.

If it involves passing legislation, everybody will probably be a loser because it will cost more to administer than it saves.

Do we have the recycling capacity anyway? Otherwise, are we going to ship it to beaches in the far-East?

p-o-p

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I support attempts to increase recycling, but this sort of thing has "Beware the law of unintended consequences" written all over it.

So if I start buying 6 plastic litres of fizzy drinks a week, + 10 plastic litres of bottled water (instead of drinking tap), and buy all my milk in plastic bottles (instead of getting it in glass from the online milkman) I will be entitled to rewards for being a good citizen.

Fair enough. Could make a start by upping G&T intake to 3 gallons a week. :)

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Where does the reward money come from? The Community Charge. You pay for your own prize. Wonderful.

p-o-p

I heard on the radio that ti would be the firms that provide the tickets / discounts. No tax-payers money at all, except in administering it. Stealing your neighbours cans for your own bin could become rife, eh. I doubt that many councils will implement a reward system, it's yet more boxes.

I can't believe that people are now thinking this is bad, when the Labour idiots wanted to charge you MORE for your rubbish on top of your council tax.

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I can't believe that people are now thinking this is bad, when the Labour idiots wanted to charge you MORE for your rubbish on top of your council tax.

Well, I ain't no fan of Labour, but what councils get from heavy waste producers they won't need from central gov, and that means debt reduction.

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Guest happy?

I like Eric Pickles scrapping the stupid system of fines for putting out too much rubbish, or not recycling etc....

One of the reasons against it would be that it wouldn't work as people would fly tip or use other people's bins. Can't argue with that logic.

So now, your bin is going to get weighed and you get free cinema tickets and the like for recycling more. Great, but what's to stop you lobbing a load of bricks in? Or, if they check for recycleable materials, what's to stop you nicking someone else's tins and bottles?

Just wondering, I'm sure there's a sensible answer. We are talking local government after all.

The only way to practically reduce waste is to reduce consumption at source - making manufacturers responsible for waste collection and re-cycling would go along way to achieving this. Indeed any scheme which incentivises manufacturers would make a far greater contribution than putting the blame on the end user.

Eric Pickles' scheme would of course increase waste as there would be no incentive to stop over-packaging - as XQ says it has the law of unintended consequences written all over it - either that or he knows it's greenwash.

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There is a very simple way that works and the Dutch have been doing it for many decades.

You put the price of a glass bottle or jar up when you buy it at the supermarket.

You refund the money when people return the glass jar or bottle to the supermarket for recycling.

Result?

Almost everyone recycles.

All this fuss about hand sorting plastics etc is also ridiculous, if you just stamp a barcode into the plastic mould, a computer can sort it out...

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Guest happy?

There is a very simple way that works and the Dutch have been doing it for many decades.

You put the price of a glass bottle or jar up when you buy it at the supermarket.

You refund the money when people return the glass jar or bottle to the supermarket for recycling.

Or you could just wash it and re-use it just like milk bottles - but that would be more expensive than re-cycling because the dice have been loaded that way.

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  • 259 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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