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Where Does The Government Spend Our Money?

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Where does the Government spend our money?

( Edit. Larger magnification here: http://www.improving-visualisation.org/vis/id=301 )

Factfile-UK-public-spendi-003.jpg

From The Guardian.

( Originally posted by 'LeeT', on the pinned Charts Thread, on 07 June )

Edit. Larger magnification here: http://www.improving-visualisation.org/vis/id=301

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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1.3bn a year to "sub-saharan Africa".

PIss. Wall. Up against.

So, out of a budget of £620bn, your first cut would be that £1.3bn of aid to Sub-Saharan Africa?

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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several things jump out at you:

  1. tax credit benefits - lunacy to give them to relatively well-off families;
  2. the state pension costs an appalling amount that will only get bigger - it needs to be at least partly means tested;
  3. schools - near enough the most important thing on the list but cost an appalling amount - can the cost be trimmed somehow?;
  4. ditto health [except we know that this cost includes plenty of waste];
  5. ditto defence [without the 'important' bit];
  6. the amount going to the banks shuold be enough to make anyone who isn't already angry pretty well furious;
  7. disabled people need proper care and i'm sure that the amount per person is completely fair enough... but we all know that we can't possibly have that many genuinely disabled people... how many 'sensitive persons' syndrome' type cases are claiming?;
  8. housing benefit - sort it out; and
  9. how can a tiny place like scotland possibly be so expensive?
Edited by the flying pig

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Tax credits 23.7billion - This is where to start.

I may be controversial now, but I think Scotland should be independent. Ideally, Wales and Northern Ireland also. At least financially self-sufficient. They can do it, if they re-focus on self-reliance. The Republic of Ireland did very well in the past couple of decades, and even considering their current financial problems, their GDP per head is still much higher than Britain's.

I agree with "LuckyOne" :

Very interesting.

It seems that British people spend a bit over 10% of their total spending on "devolution spending" for people in NI, Scotland and Wales.

In my opinion, they should either devolve fully and fund themselves or accept spending that the rest of the British population "enjoy".

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"Financial stability" i.e. bank bailouts £86bn. Over £4k per full time worker in the UK in one year. Totally criminal.

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yeah I do applaud the Gardian for their pretty chart....

but the that chart good as it is doesn't come close to the shocking size of the figures you see in the database

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/Department_for_Work_and_Pensions/

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/Department_for_Work_and_Pensions/Social_Security_Benefits.html

6.108592 Billion GBP on "P37 S120307 INCAPACITY BENEFIT SHORT TERM" !?

11.448147 Billion GBP on "P37 S120808 DISABILITY LIVING ALLOWANCE"

133.28 Million GBP on P37 S120103 Christmas bonus :)

maybe we should get rid of wales and scotland ;)

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/Scotland_Office/

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/Wales_Office/

And this gem from 2008/9

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2008-09/HMT_Central_Exchequer/_DUP_Dept_Unallocated_Provision_curr_exp_which_cannot_be_assigned.html

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2008-09/HM_Treasury/Provisions_Other.html

lovely

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2008-09/HM_Treasury/Additions_JV_A.html

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"Financial stability" i.e. bank bailouts £86bn. Over £4k per full time worker in the UK in one year. Totally criminal.

Come now, be fair. Those magnificent, wealth-creating, capitalist champions deserve every penny. In a rational society we would sack a few nurses and teachers immediately so that we can give the bankers more.

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several things jump out at you:

  1. tax credit benefits - lunacy to give them to relatively well-off families;

  2. the state pension costs an appalling amount that will only get bigger - it needs to be at least partly means tested;

  3. schools - near enough the most important thing on the list but cost an appalling amount - can the cost be trimmed somehow?;

  4. ditto health [except we know that this cost includes plenty of waste];

  5. ditto defence [without the 'important' bit];

  6. the amount going to the banks shuold be enough to make anyone who isn't already angry pretty well furious;

  7. disabled people need proper care and i'm sure that the amount per person is completely fair enough... but we all know that we can't possibly have that many genuinely disabled people... how many 'sensitive persons' syndrome' type cases are claiming?;

  8. housing benefit - sort it out; and

  9. how can a tiny place like scotland possibly be so expensive?

A different (complementary) approach could be to trim a little public sector salaries across the board, by, say, 5%.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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"Financial stability" i.e. bank bailouts £86bn. Over £4k per full time worker in the UK in one year. Totally criminal.

I was wondering about this. The year for the raph is 2008/09 which is the year of the bailout. But surely this is a one off cost. So in theory the figures for 90/10 should be 86 bill less.

So why is the structural deficit still going up? Has Labour increase spending by more or have tax revenues collapsed by a massive amount.

Either way something is fishy somewhere.

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A different (complimentary) approach could be to trim a little public sector salaries across the board, by, say, 5%.

a bit harsh.

they might try something like:

  • earnings up to £20k - no cut

  • earnings £20k-£30k - 2% cut

  • earnings £30k-£40k - 4% cut

  • etc

  • earnings £50k-£100k - 5% cut

  • earnings over £100k [mostly GPs I guess] - 10% cut

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A different (complimentary) approach could be to trim a little public sector salaries across the board, by, say, 5%.

While this seems a good idea, that really will keep the dross in. It’s been mentioned cutting 50% off over 25k. I’d go with a mix of the two. Get rid of the useless penpushers (diversity officers, kerb inspectors, smoking ban enforcers etc.) and cut the 50%.

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I was wondering about this. The year for the raph is 2008/09 which is the year of the bailout. But surely this is a one off cost. So in theory the figures for 90/10 should be 86 bill less.

So why is the structural deficit still going up? Has Labour increase spending by more or have tax revenues collapsed by a massive amount.

Either way something is fishy somewhere.

I think you are right. The bailout should be a one off. Besides, according to the Institute for Financial Studies (IFS) the government may even profit from the bank shares they bought at rock-bottom price, depending on these shares' future sale price, of course. And if I remember well, the IFS' worst case scenario, according to the BBC, would be a cost of £12bn for the bank bail out.

Again, IIRC, the 2 main cause of the current budget deficit were:

A drop in tax revenues, as the banks profits went down, and with it Corporation Taxes.

An increase in government spending by Brown - "fiscal stimulus" - to "end the recession" preferably before the election.

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I think you are right. The bailout should be a one off. Besides, according to the Institute for Financial Studies (IFS) the government may even profit from the bank shares they bought at rock-bottom price, depending on these shares' future sale price, of course...

yeah, it's all on a 'cash out' basis. even stuff like loans to students, which will be paid back, and similarly the bank bailouts, are in. so not always comparing like with like. still very interesting though.

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a bit harsh.

they might try something like:

  • earnings up to £20k - no cut

  • earnings £20k-£30k - 2% cut

  • earnings £30k-£40k - 4% cut

  • etc

  • earnings £50k-£100k - 5% cut

  • earnings over £100k [mostly GPs I guess] - 10% cut

You are right. That is much better.

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Hang on a second

Northern Fecking Ireland !!!!

15125673000 GBP

is got a population of

1,685,000 ?

thats nearly 9 grand per person !!!

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/

http://www.publicspendingdata.co.uk/2009-10/Northern_Ireland_Office/

please can we spin this one off to the irish ASAP !

:lol:

I agree 100% with you there.

Same for Scotland, and hopefully even Wales.

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While this seems a good idea, that really will keep the dross in. It’s been mentioned cutting 50% off over 25k. I’d go with a mix of the two. Get rid of the useless penpushers (diversity officers, kerb inspectors, smoking ban enforcers etc.) and cut the 50%.

I agree, has to a mix of the two.

And the "the flying pig" had a better idea for salaries reductions:

a bit harsh.

they might try something like:

  • earnings up to £20k - no cut

  • earnings £20k-£30k - 2% cut

  • earnings £30k-£40k - 4% cut

  • etc

  • earnings £50k-£100k - 5% cut

  • earnings over £100k [mostly GPs I guess] - 10% cut

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A different (complementary) approach could be to trim a little public sector salaries across the board, by, say, 5%.

What, a bit like what is happening in the private sector?

I doubt the unions would accept it. They'd strike. Then we could spot who is not making a blind bit of difference whether they work or go on strike.

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